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Full text of "Lasell leaves"

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Vol. XXXXVIII 



No. 1 



NOVEMBER, 1922 



LASELL LEAVES 



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tljattk you far ymtr mlnta patronage in 
ilje paat ano aljaU almaya bt Ija»»g to a?ro? gnu. 

($ur SUonw &*rotr* with, iia "£>iannarb nf 
£f»ll«i»" ia tljp Ijigljrat guarantee of gualitg ano 
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Boston 



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LASELL LEAVES 



Distinctive Coats 



FOR THE 



College Girl 

Sports Coats — Fur Trimmed 
Fur Coats 



03 




Jordan Marsh Company 



Boston 



T^our Christmas Shopping? 

The E. T. Slattery Company did it for you in Europe weeks ago, picking 
up delightful novelties in France, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, England. 
They're all ready now — lovely gifts, bearing all the charm that distinguishes 
things imported. 

There are gifts for everybody, too, from imported silk neckties for father 
and leather cigarette cases for brother to roosters that strut and crow and 
please the children. 

All this without mentioning the host of feminine gifts — gloves, perfumes, 
handkerchiefs, dainty hand-made "undies," beaded bags, and so on ad 
infinitum — gathered together to save you the troublesome Christmas 
shopping during the precious holidays. 

E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




Make Your Rug 
Dollars Count 



Oldest Rug House 
in America 



Linoleum Time Is Here 
This Is Linoleum Place 



EVERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
The same applies to offices and public places in general. PiD 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemsnted to the floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 



John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



^^^^^^^^H^^^ 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 



an 



d Fu 



rs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



t ^BA eilALlly 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



Imported Topcoats 

for College Girls 

Youthful Suits and 
Sport Hats 

Gloves 
Fine Furs 

Everything distinctive and unusual 

[#lliis&|«iirkiitei||.. 

383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



Oasell Leaves 



Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., NOVEMBER, 1922 No. 1 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasel! Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 





LIST OF OFFICERS 




Business Manager 




Subscription Manager 


JOSEPHINE CURRY 


Editor-in-Chief 
HELEN L. CHAPMAN 


ARLINE ALLSOPP 


Johe Editor 




Athletic Editor 


LOUISA C. VENABLE 


Local Editors 

MARGARET BUNNELL 
MARY M. DeWOLF 


CAROLYN S. COLTON 


Assista.it Joke Editor 




Literary Editor 


M. EVELYN SHIDLER 




ELIZABETH BRISTOW 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, IS cents. 



CONTENTS 



LITERARY 



EDITORIALS 



LOCALS 



10 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 13 

SCHOOL ROSTER 14 

PERSONALS • 17 



JOKES 



26 



^>^. 




THE OLD-FASHIONED GARDEN 

The Sun's last rays are fading fast, 
And o'er the garden hangs a haze. 
The branches of the willows cast 
Their mystic shadows through the maze. 
The clouds are few and cannot last. 

Faint odors wafted by the breeze, 

The smell of rose and mignonette, 

The gentle humming of the bees, 

And now, at last, the sun has set ; 

The clouds show dimly through the trees. 

The mild moon spreads her silver rays — 
It shone ten thousand years ago — 
And happily the fountain plays, 
Bathed in the soft celestial glow ; 
The clouds float down their azure ways. 

The calm is broken ; deep and low, 
The croaking of the frogs is heard, 
The owl's nightly tale of woe, 
And soft complaint of pensive bird. 
Across the sky, clouds gently blow. 

Again a solemn silence reigns ; 
The dawn steals slowly up the sky. 
Once more the garden's flowered lanes 
Show pale and still, and o'er them high 
The white clouds trail their silver trains. 

M. Crawford '22 



140 Wharamtala Street, 
Calcutta, India, 

April 25, 1922. 
Dear Buddie Boy : — 

I am sure Mother reads you from our let- 
ters many of the stories that would interest 
you, but this time I am going to write a really- 
truly letter just to you. What a big boy you 
are growing to be, and how glad we are to 
hear about your days at school and the good 
times you have at home. 

I shall tell you first about some of the things 
we see right here in Calcutta, and then per- 
haps, if there is time I shall tell you about a 
trip into the "mofussil," which is the Bengali 
word for "country." 



Looking out of my window this morning, I 
saw our servant playing in the court-yard with 
his two liittle boys and young daughter. The 
children were making mud pies, just as I saw 
you doing not so many months ago, although 
the little hands that formed these pies are not 
white but shiny dark brown; and I could hear 
them bargaining for the little cakes, and say- 
ing, "This one costs two pice," "Well, you may 
have these two for one anna." And so their 
chatter went on, and when they got tired of 
making patties and cakes, they began to mold 
some pottery, making many kinds of dishes and 
vessels to hold water, rice, and curry. Soon 
they spied me in the window, and away they 
scampered as fast as their little feet could 
carry them to the little mud, thatched-roof , one- 
door hut in which they live. But I could see 
them peeking from behind the doorway, gayly 
waving their little hands and laughing, and I 
said to myself, "You little dears, how you do 
make believe that you are shy !" 

By this time the grandfather clock in our 
breezy living room told me I must get ready 
for the shopping trip downtown; so I sum- 
moned Proshad, our faithful house servant, 
asking him to call for a gharry. Mother will 
show you the picture of the Queen Victoria 
style carriage which is called "gharry" here 
in the land of sunshine and flowers. It is 
much too hot to walk very far, and as I sit 
back in the comfortable gharry seat, many odd 
sights meet my eyes as we travel along so 
that sometimes I wonder whether I am really 
in India, or back in the dear old U. S. A. For 
at one moment automobiles are dashing swiftly 
by, and the next moment our Hindu gharry 
waller, or driver, almost hits a bullock cart 



LASELL LEAVES 



which is slowly but surely winding its way 
through the heavy traffic with its load of jute; 
bamboo stalks, grain, lumber, or what not. 
Carts and bullocks are used instead of horses 
and wagons. You would expect the bullock to 
have a harness, wouldn't you ? But instead 
you would find a cord drawn through his 
nostrils by means of which the driver guides 
him this way and that, with the additional help 
of twitching his tail and using a short stick for 
a whip, this usually being bamboo. And in- 
stead of sitting up on a high seat, the driver 
sits on one of the bamboo poles which run 
across and really form the cart. The men call 
a good deal to each other, and to the animals 
they are driving, and shout loudly to the peo- 
ple who are always getting in their way ; so 
there are always plenty of noises to keep us on 
the look-out for something to happen. 

It is most interesting to watch the different 
people as we ride about. There are the bright- 
faced clerks, dressed in shirt and snow-white 
baggy trousers of dhati, on their way to 
their offices; there are fine, black-eyed boys 
carrying messages and packages about the city, 
sometimes riding on a bicycle ; the mail man 
who brings me your letters ; the people in the 
shops and bazaars along Lindsey Street; the 
water-carrier, with his pig-skin bag slung over 
his shoulder, holding the neck in his hand, 
ready to let the water pour out; the barber 
beneath the banyan tree at the roadside, shav- 
ing the customer who sits in front of him with 
a looking-glass in his hand ; the coolies carry- 
ing furniture and all kinds of burdens on their 
heads; the women carrying water-jars or 
baskets on their heads, or a laughing — some- 
times a crying — baby at one side ; the many 
beggars who walk, or try to move about as best 
their crippled condition will let them, coming 
up to the gharry and begging for alms the 
minute we stop ; and always dozens of little 
children everywhere, playing, singing, working, 
or walking along the streets and roads. Every 
day I see a helpless, blind little fellow, oh so 
sweet-faced, who is placed on the street of 
the near-by park every morning, left there all 



day to receive food and a few coins, until very 
late at night someone takes him away, only to 
bring him again the next morning. 

I had been to the great market with its beau- 
tiful color array and things of every descrip- 
tion, about which Mother has told you from 
our letters, and was at last coming out of one 
of the big English shops on Chawringhee Road, 
when I paused a minute to look at some goods 
in the window. I had been standing there 
alone, when suddenly a great shadow came 
alongside of me and I saw a big white cow 
calmly gazing into the window with me. What 
would you think of such a happening while 
you were with Mother on Fifth Avenue in 
New York? You see the cows are put to 
graze in the Maidon, or common, just across 
from this fashionable avenue, and each morn- 
ing and evening great herds are driven back 
and forth. The cow is such a sacred animal 
that you often see a Hindu stroke one reverent- 
ly as he passes by. 

Two days ago, we went part of the way by 
automobile up into the country. As we rode 
along many curious sights met our eyes, one 
of which was that of a little boy, your size, 
holding a bird cage under a street hydrant 
to bathe the birdie. The little bird was hop- 
ping about as though he were having lots of 
fun. Some cows were visiting with the peo- 
ple on the road, going up to some of the shops 
and eating grain from the bags. At one place 
many people were gathered, talking, laughing, 
and having a general good time, and mingled in 
the group were about six dogs, a few monkeys, 
several crows, two pigs, and some cows. 
Wouldn't you like to have played with them 
all? As our car passed, half a dozen little 
Hindu boys, with one straight lock of hair 
standing up in the middle of their heads (by 
which they would be drawn to Heaven) came 
running towards us, and four bright-faced, 
black-eyed little girls, wearing pearl nose- 
drops, and bangles on their arms and ankles, 
smiled at us very sweetly. They all looked at 
us as though we were real curiosities. Perhaps 



6 



LASELL LEAVES 



they wondered how we could have such 
white skins, and wear so many fussy clothes. 
We greeted them with "Salaam, Salaam," and 
after we were almost out of their sight, we 
could hear them return the greeting. 

As we afterwards rode along in the six- 
passenger compartment of the little train, we 
could see people working knee-deep in water 
in the many rice-fields for which Bengal is 
especially famous, because we have so much 
rainfall, and this was the season for trans- 
planting the little green tufts, just as you trans- 
plant lettuce. At the railroad stations there 
is always much to see, for there are many peo- 
ple talking to each other, and getting excited 
to board the third class compartments of the 
train. Usually there is a little boy, or a 
young man, selling tea and bread and butter 
or cakes. He is usually a Hindu boy wearing 
about his neck a cord with a charm attached to 
it which is to keep away sickness and evil 
spirits. Towards evening, at the call to prayer, 
we see Mohammedans spreading their little 
mats, paying no attention to any one about 
them, but kneeling and muttering their peti- 
tions. 

It was twilight when we came to our des- 
tination. As we rode, in a bullock tonga, to 
the bungalow where we were to stay for a few 
days, we heard the coyotes raising their wails 
in the darkness of the night, and some little 
white foxes crossed our path. 

It had been a very busy day, so we were glad 
to rest and go to bed early, getting under our 
mosquito tents where we were well protected, 
if not very cool. The next day many new and 
interesting happenings and experiences were 
ours, but I will tell you about them another 
time. 

This is quite a long letter for my little boy 
to read, even if he is growing tall very fast, as 
his Mother tells us he is ; so we will say good- 
bye for this trip, sending bushels of love to 
him, his Mother, and Daddy. 

Affectionately yours, 

Aunt Ida. 

/. Markert '23. 



IN JUNGLE LAND 

A few feet below lay the Great Black Pool, 
reflecting in its immeasurable depths the glory 
of the African stars. The giant eucalyptus 
glowed supernaturally in the starlight and 
seemed to be bending forward to see itself 
reflected in the placid waters. The trees be- 
side it bowed and quivered in the soft wind, 
swinging gently the little creatures who had 
sought the shelter of their leafy boughs. 

Two fiery green eyes appeared glinting 
through the darkness of the ferns ; a shadowy 
form crouched forward longingly to lap the 
cool refreshing waters, sending delicate ripples 
gliding over the smooth surface. 

Without warning, the deep silence of the 
night was shattered by the hunting call of a 
tiger, a low growl rising steadily to a piercing 
scream and then sliding down again into an odd 
minor, slowly dying away into nothingness. 
The trees seemed to become alive with flying- 
shadows. Muttering, chattering, and scream- 
ing, the monkeys fled from limb to limb ; birds 
twittered and whistled excitedly ; the under- 
brush crackled and snapped beneath the swift 
tread of small panic-stricken animals. The 
entire jungle had awakened and all the beasts 
seemed trying to out-do one another in flight 
and noise. 

Gradually the terror died out until the quiet 
peace was broken only by some lonely howl, 
far off in the distance. 

M. DeWolf. 



A MARTYR TO THE CAUSE 

"And they don't even suspect us ! Just 
think, girls, if we could be the first class to an- 
nounce the title of the Sophomore Play." Mad 
took another caramel and sat down, as calm 
as if she had never thought of throwing at the 
class such a bomb. 

We were all gathered in the library of the 
Freshman dorm, and the girls were demolish- 
ing the contents of a box I had just received 
from home. You see, I had a toothache and 
couldn't eat, and they were afraid the food 
might spoil. Nobody but Mad would have 



LASELL 

thought of even suggesting such a wild idea, 
but just because she has three fur coats and 
two good-looking men fairly rushing her to 
death, it doesn't seem as if she could say any- 
thing foolish. I really didn't feel very enthu- 
siastic, but every one else was so crazy about 
the idea that it made me realize what low 
spirits I was in, unable, as I was, to forget 
that I must go to the dentist the next day, and 
suffer other trials yet. 

I now realize my folly, but it was then my 
first year at school and I knew no better. The 
girls told me that, besides being small, I was 
calm and self-possessed and just the girl to 
do a great thing for my class. They also re- 
minded me how popular I was — something 
I never truly realized before — so I consented 
to do. their bidding though it promised trouble. 
It seemed so easy ! I must go into the gym 
soon after dinner where Peg and Marion 
were to have a nice warm bed made in the war 
canoe for me. All I had to do was rest there 
in absolute concealment and listen to the plans 
of our upper classmen. I really felt quite 
pleased with myself ; every one was so nice to 
me, my roommate even waiting for me to get 
into bed so that she could have the honor of 
closing the windows and turning off the lights. 

But for all that I really didn't sleep very 
well, being troubled by a vivid dream in which 
I was chased by the whole Sophomore Class ; 
but when I awoke in the bright sunshiny morn- 
ing, and when, later, I returned from the den- 
tist still alive, I felt much better over the mat- 
ter, indeed really quite buoyant. But my 
spirits began to sink towards night so that by 
the time we entered that dark, hollow, echoing 
gym I was really depressed. It then became 
evident that I had been quite misinformed 
about the size of the canoe. Canoes are really 
awfully small, but the girls seeing how calm 
and brave I appeared to be didn't suspect how 
shaky I really felt, and left me in that lone- 
some gym as cheerfully as if it had been a 
movie theatre. My remedy for timidity and 
loneliness was to chew fudge as fast as pos- 
sible ; it was diverting; besides that, after the 
Sophomores came, eating would be impossible. 



LEAVES 7 

it makes so much noise. Meantime I was 
terribly frightened, shaking and shivering at 
each little noise. 

After countless hours of this agony, the 
door opened with a bang. I shall probably 
always bear a scar where I bumped my head 
against the canoe. It was the Sophomores ! 
I could hear Marjory Shepherd laugh. To 
this day, every time I hear her laugh, my 
heart jumps right out of place. 

Up to this time the thought that I was do- 
ing something big and grand for my class had 
sustained me, but now my faith in this was 
shattered, for, as they moved to the further 
side of that huge room, I realized that I 
could not distinguish a word, because my heart 
was pounding so hard. I suffered on, growing 
stiffer and stiffer, listening to the girls merely 
mumbling and laughing. Everything seemed 
to please them, and every time they laughed I 
grew furious. It is terrible not to like your 
own schoolmates, but to me just then even my 
own classmates were not as dear as they should 
have been. 

What one can endure and still live is almost 
unbelievable. At last they clattered out and 
away, and after several hours more my should- 
be solicitous classmates came out and freed 
me. Now came the hardest blow of all, — they 
did not in the least sympathize with me but 
seemed rather to blame me, because I had not 
possessed abnormal hearing capacity. The 
next day, sad to say, every one had forgotten 
what I suffered for the great cause, but I 
have discovered that this is only natural. See 
how the people have forgotten the brave deeds 
of those in France! Nevertheless I believe 
every one receives his due reward in the end, 
if not in this life, then in the hereafter. 

D. Caldwell '22. 



LOUISA ALCOTT'S HOME 

Although there are many places of historic 
and literary interest in Concord, I believe that 
the home of Louisa May Alcott has become al- 
most a shrine for her many admirers. Next 
to Hawthorne's famous Wayside, set far back 
from the road, and surrounded by beautiful 



8 LASELL 

and stately trees, is the house which is yearly 
visited by pilgrims from all parts of the world. 

On the right of the path leading to the door 
the famous Owl Tree claims a moment's at- 
tention. Then one enters the small hall from 
which open the parlor and the dining-room, 
both of which the gifted author immortalized 
as the scene of the amateur theatricals in 
"Little Women." Returning to the hall and 
entering the library opposite the parlor, one 
is delighted to discover the manuscripts, let- 
ters, and autographs of Bronson Alcott, all 
carefully preserved, together with the family 
portraits, among which are several pictures 
of the famous twins — Daisy and Demi. Amy's 
studio is next ; it contains her charcoal draw- 
ings, paintings, sketches, and the breadboard 
on which she burned a picture with the stove 
poker during one of her early efforts in art. 

Ascending the stairs to the second floor, one 
finds on the left, Louisa Alcott's own room. 
Here are her bookcase, her manuscripts, and 
the desk where she wrote many of her books. 
Directly across the hall is her mother's room, 
most interesting to a student of the Alcott fam- 
ily history. 

To an art student, however, Amy's room is 
perhaps the most fascinating place in the house, 
as the early drawings of May Alcott are there, 
ornamenting the woodwork and walls, and 
preserved from the curio hunter by glass. 
Across the hall is the small room where are 
kept the costumes worn by the little women, 
in their plays. Included among these things 
are the famous russet boots. 

Many consider that after seeing these rooms 
■ and returning to the library to write their 
names in the visitors' book the visit to this de- 
lightful spot is concluded ; but no visit to the 
Alcott house is complete until one has followed 
the narrow winding path, behind the house, 
through the woods to the old, rustic building, 
now dimly discernible through the trees. This 
once sheltered that gathering of famous Amer- 
ican writers and philosophers — known as the 
School of Philosophy. 

Here may be brought to a fitting close the 
visit to one of the most noted and loved homes 
in New England. A. Trondsen. 



LEAVES 

LATE OCTOBER 

We looked out of a Woodland Park class 
room window one golden morning of 
a crisp October day. A bird nest 
swayed among the gnarled, wind-bared 
branches where only a few months be- 
fore, we had listened to young bird calls and 
watched the flight of uncertain little wings 
guided by solicitous cries. Well filled cellars 
had bared the neighboring fields and fruit 
trees. In the distance great, fragrant hay- 
stacks, "flowers of yesterday," stood waiting 
to be gathered into sheltering barns. In the 
October glory of leaves of gold and sky of 
azure, flocks of birds were migrating south- 
ward or busily preparing with other feathered 
and furry folk, for winter's cold. 

Everywhere were signs of purpose, order, 
trustful signs of the promise, after winter's 
black storms, of the mysteries of a new awak- 
ening. 

"And may we write it in verse, if we wish 
because some things seem to go that way ?" 

Which of course they do and here are two 
of the ways— 

AUTUMN 
October is a month of joy and sadness linked to- 
gether ; 
The leaves drift down with graceful glides 
To welcome colder weather. 
The pumpkins in the yellowed fields, 
Will soon be gathered in, 

Before the storms of winter and cold days begin. 
At night the crickets sing, 
While birds On swift-poised wing, 
Fly southward from the winter snows. 
In autumn all things seem quite dead 
But instead, 

They are only having sleep and rest. 
"Oh suns and skies and clouds of June, 
And birds and flowers together, 
You cannot rival for one hour, 
October's glorious weather." 

Marjorie Winslow, 12 years. 

SPRING 

Out in the orchard the blossoms are falling 

And I hear the music of thrushes calling; 

Here and there a butterfly, 

With wings of blue like the April sky. 

Flutters up and past and back again 

To dodge the apple-blossom rain. 

Down by the vine-covered wall flows the brook 

With a secret or picture in every nook; 

A wild rose or violet here and there 

And budding primroses everywhere. 

Marguerite Gillespie, 13 years. 




The best thing perhaps with which to start 
the year is good spirit. In the army they call 
it morale ; without it a battle was never known 
to be won. The best stimulus for morale is 
co-operation and in these days of efficiency it is 
the far cry of government, industry, society. 
So let us work together here in school, turn out 
100% Lasell girls to the games, and to the en- 
tertainments, always be among those present 
at the parties — need we urge the last ? Surely 
not after you have gone to one ! One more 
urgent urge, when we are compelled to go to 
church, to vespers, chapel, classes — do it with 
a spirit to be admired. One joy germ will 
carry ten people through a bad day. Let's 
have a year of enthusiasm, interest, apprecia- 
tion, efficiency — a real Lasell morale ! 

H. L. C. 

APPRECIATION 

A hill in blue October, 

A cloud with edges gray, 

A tinge of orange in the leaves— 

These for a moment stay. 

A dart, a busy squirrel ! 

Look, see departing wings ! 

Pull close your coat, walk briskly on — 

But remember all these things. 

H. L. C. 

LASELL GIRLS 

A glimpse into the happiest things 
As shown in smiling faces, 
- A heart that cheerful music sings 
Is needed in all places. 

A sprightly walk with chin held high, 
A friendly nod as well, 
A keen intelligence in the eye, — 
Here's to your girls, Lasell ! 

H. L. C. 



Auburndale, in the fall, is one of the most 
beautiful spots around this part of the country. 
Who can deny it when, as they canoe along the 
Charles, they think of the beauty of the sur- 
rounding scenery? The sky a deep azure, the 
water an exact reflection of the heavens — and 
the bank fragrant with pine ! It's there that 
they see the gorgeous coloring of the foliage, 
the dull green gold of turning bushes ; the 
crimson of the leaves and the sombre green of 
the pines against the sky. In the air — what 
exhilaration is in the heady, pungent smell of 
burning leaves ! 

Right on the campus we have gorgeous fall 
sights. As we come over to dinner from the 
outside houses, the world is very close about us 
in its beauty. Bragdon Hall on the hill, sil- 
houetted against a rapidly darkening sky with 
the lights glowing gold in the windows and a 
brisk breeze whirling past laden with sailing 
leaves, causes a thrill of pleasure. 

To any girl who loves the beauties of her 
surroundings, such autumn loveliness will be 
a joy, and months in such a spot will bring 
sweet memories when she has left Lasell. 

Elizabeth Bristow. 




On September 19th, the halls of old Brag- 
don and Woodland echoed again the shouts 
of the "new girls." The next day ushered in 
the arrival of the "old girls" and many were 
the joyous reunions. 

Three events of special importance followed, 
marking the opening of the 1922-23 year at 
Lasell. The first was the get-togemer dance 
the night of the twentieth. A six piece or- 
chestra jazzed madly and enchantingly and a 
wonderful time was had by both new and old. 
This was followed by the informal "Old Girl, 
New Girl Dance." Every one went, and the 
old girls did their best to show the new girls 
the true Lasell Spirit. 

Last but not least came the announcement 
of the Senior Class Officers. The beloved 
President of the Junior Class, "Pinkie" Puck- 
ett, was re-elected — much to the delight of all. 
Anna Bullock was elected Vice President ; 
Mercedes Rendell, Secretary ; Florence 
Boehmcke, Treasurer ; Helen Lightbody, Song 
Leader ; and Rosalie Gruhn, Cheer Leader. 

Sunday night, the twenty- four: h, all the new 
girls were invited to the Senior houses ; many 
Lasell songs were sung and the new girls re- 
sponded heartily with music and reciting. 

On September 27, Miss June Buchanan, so- 
cial worker in the Caney Creek district of the 
Kentucky mountains spoke to us in chapel in 



an intensely interesting way, of the life of the 
mountaineers. It brought back to our minds 
the little Caney Creek lads who addressed us 
at Vespers one evening last year, and who 
moved us to smiles and tears. All success to 
this noble effort to make a little corner of our 
land "fit to grow fine men and women to 
serve and to rule over her." 

Our second Friday was Initiation Day and 
we surely are sorry for any one who missed 
seeing the new girls on dress parade. Big and 
little were togged out in middy blouses hind- 
side-foremost, skirts topsy-turvy, shoes un- 
mated, stockings likewise. Bobbed, short, and 
long haired girls all had to wear their locks in 
pigtails, thirteen, each tied with a different col- 
ored ribbon. Many were invited to step upon 
the stage at chapel and being fine sports, re- 
sponded to all demands amid hilarious ap- 
plause. The Seniors made use of their power 
to command, that day, with the result that 
many dreaded tasks were accomplished as by 
magic. 

Our first Christian Endeavor was led by 
Helen Chapman, who spoke impressively to us 
on the making of friendships. 

October 3, three new members were ac- 
cepted in the Senior Class, — Dorothy May, 
Mary Ann Miller, and Dorothy Chase. Con- 
gratulations ! 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



Members of the Shakespeare class had the 
privilege of seeing Robert Mantell in "Mac- 
beth" and "As You Like It" during his recent 
appearance at Boston Opera House. Man- 
tell's powerful interpretation forced home the 
unscrupulous ambition of Macbeth, and em- 
phasized the dread possibilities of punishment 
wrapped up in one's own nature. Virginia 
Hamper's portrayal of Lady Macbeth brought 
out her wifely sympathy and her forcing of a 
fierceness and cruelty unnatural to her better 
self. The impersonations of the witches and 
Banquo's ghost were thoroughly artistic as 
was also the bewitching setting of Arden For- 
est with Virginia Hamper, a most charming 
Rosalind. 

We have been very fortunate this year in 
having, for our vesper services, speakers 
whose messages we have appreciated 
thoroughly. 

At our first service Dr. J. Edgar Park spoke 
to us on the meaning of God. Dr. Butters was 
most inspiring in his talk September 30 on 
Happiness. The vesper service October 7 was 
led by Dr. Hartman, the Editor of Zion's Her- 
ald. He explained to us the Fourth Dimension 
and suggested how it could be applied to our 
lives. Dr. MacLure had for his text "Little 
children, keep yourselves from Idols," which 
he analyzed very cleverly. September 21 we 
enjoyed the Rev. Charles N. Arbuckle's talk 
on Faith, which was most satisfying. 

The first two Saturday mornings Miss Pot- 
ter, in her own delightful way, gave us needed 
instruction ; first, regarding table manners ; 
second, dress. In the latter talk she was as- 
sisted by Miss Wright. 

We enjoyed one of our greatest treats, 
Thursday evening, October 12, when Nidelka 
Simeonova, a violinist of rare promise and a 
pupil of Leopold Auer entertained us with her 
marvelous playing. We wish the young Bul- 
garian artist all success in her New York and 
Boston debuts and hope we may be privileged 
to hear her again. 

The Boston-Cambridge tour was a great suc- 
cess. Among the most interesting things seen 
were the glass flowers in the Harvard Museum 



and the Longfellow library. Mary Baker 
Eddy's home, Boston College, Polytechnical 
Buildings, and the site of the former home of 
the author of "America" were pointed out by 
Miss Arey, the chaperon. 

We all enjoyed the New-Old Girl Dance 
which brought about many an impromptu intro- 
duction, leading to firm friendships. It's very 
hard not to become acquainted with someone 
who rushes straight into your arms from the 
other side of the room and gasps, "C-c-can you 
lead ?" 

The Seniors were "at home" to us, Friday, 
September 30. Carpenter and Gardner were 
all dressed up and their charming hostesses 
most hospitable. After wandering through the 
attractive rooms, each with its individual 
charm, we partook of refreshments, and 
wended homeward filled with artistic schemes 
for the re-arranging and re-decorating of our 
own rooms. Thank you, Seniors ! 

Saturday, October 14, about forty girls piled 
into a big sight-seeing bus, and set off for Lex- 
ington and Concord, one of our jolliest as well 
as most instructive trips. Many were the 
points of interest — Lexington Common, the old 
Hancock house, the route of Paul Revere's 
ride, Hawthorne's home, Emerson's home. 
Louisa Alcott's Old Orchard House, the 
Thoreau cairn, Sleepy Hollow Cemetery and 
Old Concord Bridge. In the midst of these 
literary and historical landmarks, who could 
fail to pay tribute to the memory of those men 
and women who raised their voices to crush 
out the cry that "Might is right," — to those 
patriots who, leaving home and field, at their 
country's need, "fired the shot heard round the 
world." 

This is the season when nearly every Sat- 
urday afternoon a large party attends a foot- 
ball game at Harvard Stadium. 

There are also many concerts and theatre 
parties scheduled. On Saturday, October 14, 
a large number of girls attended the opening 
Symphony concert; a party of sixty attended 
"Little Nellie Kelly" ; thirty, "The Bat" ; and 
a large party heard Harry Lauder. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



October 20; the Christian Endeavor Meet- 
ing was held at Woodland, led by Louise 
Puckett. Her message to us was "Prayer," 
and she spoke from her heart of the goodness 
of God and of our never-ending need of Him. 
Christine Lally sang for us with much feeling. 

The first meeting of the Dramatic Club was 
held October 20 and the following officers 
elected : Louise Puckett, President ; Helen 
Hinshaw and Louise Venable, Vice-Presi- 
dents ; Barbara Pinkham, Secretary ; Matilda 
Dougherty, Treasurer ; and Louise Woolley, 
Publicity Manager. 



OUR CHOICES 

Mrs. Winslow's Chapel Talk 

Does it ever occur to you how much of our 
like is taken up with making choices? Every 
day and many times a day we must choose 
whether we will do this or that, whether we 
will go or stay, whether we will speak or keep 
silent. 

If these choices which we are constantly 
making were as unimportant as they seem, we 
should not need to think very seriously about 
them. But a choice made today may, and very 
likely will, like a pebble thrown into the water, 
ripple on and on into the future — that misty, 
far-away time which now seems too unreal to 
bother about, but which so suddenly becomes 
the surging present. If we are hoping and 
working for a really worth-while life, we must 
make our choices, with their effect on the fu- 
ture in mind. 

To do this, it takes imagination — imagina- 
tion to picture our ideal girl or woman. But 
it also requires some hard practical thinking 
to determine how the little choices of today 
are likely to affect the ideal toward which we 
are striving. 

After we know for what harbor we are 

setting sail and have learned somewhat the 

art of sailing, then there is due need of a will 

to keep continually in the right direction. 

"For ships go East and ships go West, 
And many the gales that blow. 
'Tis the set of the sails and not the gales 
That decide where the ships shall go." 

And the "set of the sails" is not a thing that 



can be made once for all as one starts on his 
voyage. There must be a constant adjusting to 
the winds that blow — each day new questions 
to decide, new choices to make. 

Our choices must be practical to be of any 
value. In the following "parable-poem," 
"Roses Red and Roses White," a life-tragedy 
is suggested and all because the loved one chose 
to have what was impossible of attainment. 

"Roses red and roses white 
Plucked I for my love's delight. 
She would none of all my posies, 
Bade me gather her blue roses. 

Half the world I wandered through, 
Seeking where such flowers grew, 
Half the world unto my quest 
Answered but with laugh and jest. 

It may be beyond the grave 
She shall find what she would have. 
Oh ! 'Twas but an idle quest, 
Roses white and red are best." 

Let us thoughtfully and honestly choose the 
better part each day and hour, for when some 
great occasion for choosing comes, or some 
great question for decision waits, they will 
necessarily be met in the spirit and with the 
courage of all former choices — condensed into 
one telling moment. 

What if Nidelka, who played so exquisitely 
for us the other evening, had chosen to idle 
away her earlier years instead of working 
strenuously until she could draw such wonder- 
ful music from the strings of her violin. 

What if your fathers and mothers had 
chosen for you a year of loafing and idle 
pleasure-seeking instead of this harder year of 
effort and of work with its great opportunities 
for the enrichment of your lives in wisdom, ex- 
perience and friendships. 

Perhaps you say, "But I have no chance to 
prove my ability to choose wisely. My choices 
are all made for me. I have to do this and I 
have to to do that whether I would or not." 

Then your choice comes in the manner of 
accepting the inevitable — whether to let life 
"hang all patchy and scrappy" or to live the 
part allotted gracefully and gloriously. 

On the great stage of life it matters not 
so much "who is prince or who is beggar, but 
who acts prince or beggar best." 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



We must hold ourselves up strenuously to 
the best that in us lies, but let us be broad- 
minded in our judgment of others. We know 
not what unseen obstacles prevent them from 
choosing the best. Even if our roads are dif- 
ferent, we are all travellers toward the same 
goal and should have a kindly fellow-feeling. 

"You to the left and I to the right, 
For the ways of men must sever ; 
And it well may be for a day and a night, 
And it well may be forever. 

But whether we meet or whether we part, 
(For our ways are past our knowing) 
A pledge from the heart M its fellow-heart 
On the ways we all are going." 

The best choice is not always the solemn, 
unattractive, uncongenial one. It is often joy- 
ous and gay, especially if the joy is the kind 
that reflects upon someone else. 

The following verses delightfully portray 
that high desire for the best and noblest going 
hand in hand with a very human and legiti- 
mate longing for fun and laughter, symbolized 
in the "Scarlet Shoes." 

"I want to wear upon my brow 
The kiss of angels, chaste and far. 
I want to fold around me, now, 
Their warm, sweet shining, like a star, 
I would be high as heroes are, 
On perilous seas my ways would choose, 
Of stately battles wear the scar — 
I wish I had some Scarlet Shoes ! 

Sweet friends, I do not all forget 
To dream, to worship, to aspire. 
My inner soul is flaming yet, 
Burned bright upon a sacred pyre. 
Angels I see and do admire, 
Splendors I gaze upon and choose, 
Yet, midst such dream of frost and fire 
I still desire my Scarlet Shoes." 

So let us each one go forth to the day's work 
once more, thoughtfully choosing the best not 
only for today but also for the sake of the 
many tomorrows. 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

"A full Junior House and an Overflow" is 
the opening report from Woodland Park 
School. "The rainy day which greeted our 
opening could not quell our spirits. Our old 
girls were so glad to be back and all the new 



girls arrived with faces happy with anticipa- 
tion. An "old girl" says, "No one could be 
homesick at Woodland Park !" 

There are several changes in the personnel 
of the Woodland Park teachers. Mrs. Mc- 
Donald is in charge as usual. Miss Florence 
Williams has the directing of the lower school 
with the co-operation of Mrs. Palmateer. In 
the Junior High School, Mrs. Furlong is 
teacher of English and Latin, Miss Strang, 
Arithmetic and Geography, and Miss Hem- 
meon, History and French. The classes are 
full and the spirit good. Miss Bunting is di- 
recting the Music Department. Miss Harriette 
P. Case, Lasell '22, has charge of morning drill 
and is director of the playground work. Miss 
Naomi Davis, Lasell '22, and Miss Marjorie 
Gifford '22, are associates in our Music De- 
partment and Miss Gifford directs the Cook- 
ing Class which meets at Bragdon Hall each 
week. We crave all possible affiliation with 
Lasell and are very proud that every member 
of the class that completed our course last 
June is back at Lasell feeling even before her 
arrival, an intense loyalty and love for "our 
school." 

Our first historical trip of the year was the 
Lexington and Concord tour on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 23d. Miss Seeley and Miss Hemmeon 
chaperoned the party, which included all the 
house pupils and nearly all the day pupils. 

The resident Junior High School girls at- 
tended the morning services at Christ Church, 
Boston, on Sunday, October 1st, with Miss 
Case chaperoning. 

October 12, we observed Columbus Day as 
customary in our chapel exercises. 

Mr. Towne spoke to us impressively of Co- 
lumbus' power of conviction of being in the 
right and of his unswerving loyalty in living up 
to that conviction through a long and weary 
ordeal, in the face of the prejudice and ridi- 
cule of his age. 

Gwendolyn McDonald, Preble Borden and 
Vera Hambleton spoke in turn of Columbus' 
life as a heritage to our nation. Their delivery 
was dignified, natural and sincere; their re- 
marks were in part as follows : 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Viewed from the standpoint of Columbus' 
lifetime, his was a losing fight, in undertaking 
to turn the old ways of thinking upside down. 
Spanish sailors called his dream of sailing un- 
known seas, wild and visionary ; Spanish 
scholars called it foolish ; and Spanish priests 
pronounced it heresy. 

"When his crew threatened to kill their mad 
leader if he did not turn the ship's prow back 
toward home, there came a further test of his 
courage — 'Sail on !' 

"Shamed in his old age, stripped of all hon- 
ors, he died, as he was born, in obscurity and 
want. But whatever kingly grandeurs might 
have been his in his own life time, they would 
be forgotten today in the realization of the 
Italian beggar's dream. 'Our purple moun- 
tain majesties, our land of patriot's dream that 
sees beyond the years, justice and liberty for 
all mankind — these are the fitting tribute to 
the discoverer of our country." 

The exercises closed with the school's re- 
peating the Civic Creed, saluting the flag and 
singing "America the Beautiful." 

Dancing classes opened at Gardner Gym- 
nasium on Thursday, October 5th. The 
younger division is augmented by boys from 
the Allen-Chalmers Military School. The 
older group have their lessons alone this year 
and the experiment is successful. We are 
glad to have Miss Katherine Davis of Brook- 
line with us this year as Instructor of Dancing 
and Deportment. 

On Wednesday evening, October 11th, Mrs. 
McDonald entertained the faculties of Lasell 
and Woodland Park at Junior House. The 
occasion was jolly and informal, supper being 
cooked over the open fire. When it was over, 
one teacher remarked, "Miss Potter can never 
again talk about one's eating 'whatever that is 
you call a hot dog,' — for now she knows !" 

All of the Woodland Park resident pupils 
attended the violin recital given by Nidelka 
Simeonova on Thursday, October 12th at 
Bragdon Hall. The girls were very happy at 
being allowed to meet the artist and thank her 
for the delightful evening. 



Mrs. Towne knows what girls like ! She 
sends us apples and marshmallows and all sorts 
of wholesome good things ! 

Nearly all of us can swim and our Saturday 
morning sport in the swimming tank is looked 
forward to all the week. It is quite an incen- 
tive to avoiding study-hall ! 

Visiting Parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Winslow, Auburndale. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, Augusta, Maine. 
Mrs. Himelhoch, Detroit, Michigan. 
Mr. Stickney, Brookline, Mass. 
Mrs. Reisig, Brookline, Mass. 
Mr. Jackson, Toronto, Canada. 
Mr. Best, Allston, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Larrabee, Lawrence, Mass. 
Mrs. Davis, Elmira, New York. 
Mrs. Hanscom, Auburndale, Mass. 
Mrs. Borst, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Mrs. Barden, Boston, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Coombs, Belfast, Maine. 
Mrs. Rhoades, Brockton, Mass. 
Mrs. Baxter, Roxbury, Mass. 
Major and Mrs. Gillespie, Watertown Ar- 
senal. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins, Curacao, D. W. I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lamont, N. Cohasset, Mass. 



SCHOOL ROSTER 

Adams, Dorothy, Dorchester. 
Adams, Esther, Quincy. 
Aitken, Marjorie, Orange, N. J. 
Albury, Natalie, Nassau, Bahamas. 
Allsopp, Arline, Newark, N. J. 
Anderson, Elizabeth, Toledo, Ohio. 
Areson, Hortense, Roxbury. 
Averill, Eleanor, Menomonie, Wis. 
Badger, Frances, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Ballou, Avis, Providence, R. I. 
Barden, Elizabeth, Marion. 
Bardwell, Gertrude, Turners Falls. 
Barnard, Dorothy, Concord, N. H. 
Bass, Virginia, Lancaster, N. H. 
Bavier, Mabel, Melrose. 
Beecher, Catherine, Lawrence. 
Belber, Leonore, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Belber, Miriam, Philadelphia, Pa. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



Berkson, Helene, Larchmont, N. Y. 
Bills, Thelma, Blackstone. 
Bird, Manuelita, Fajardo, Porto Rico. 
Bliss, Frances, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Boehmcke, Florence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Boucher, Marie, Bradford. 
Bridger, Phyllis, Biddeford, Me. 
Brinkerhoff, Grace, Wolcott, N. Y. 
Bristow, Elizabeth, Lynn. 
Brown, Catherine, Watertown, N. Y. 
Brown, Dorothy, Peabody. 
Bryant, Lois, Hartford, Conn. 
Buettner, Elizabeth, Chicago, 111. 
Buettner, Helen, Chicago, 111. 
Bullock, Anna, Providence, R. I. 
Bullock, Margaret, Andover. 
Bunnell, Margaret, Pelham, N. Y. 
Campbell, Dorothy, North Scituate. 
Carey, Dorothy, Watertown, N. Y. 
Carp, Rosalie, Lowell. 
Chace, Elinor, Providence, R. 1. 
Chamberlin, Christine, Swampscott. 
Chandler, Elizabeth, Hudson. 
Chapman, Helen, Lake Geneva, Wis. 
Chase, Dorothy, Dorchester. 
Chase, Marietta, Winthrop. 
Clark, Frances, Plymouth. 
Clendenin, Edith, Ferguson, Mo. 
Cole, Ethel, Andover. 
Colton, Carolyn, Granby, Conn. 
Conant, Irma, Buckfield, Me. 
Copeland, Brenda, Rochester, N. H. 
Copithorn, Blanche, Natick. 
Cornell, Cora, Derry, N. H. 
Cottrell, Elizabeth, Quincy, 111. 
Cox, Dorothea, Hartford, Conn. 
Cummings, Helen, Auburn, Me. 
Curry, Josephine, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Cushing, Barbara, Groveton, N. H. 
Daugherty, Anna, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Daugherty, Matilda, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dawson, Harriet, New Bedford. 
DeWolf, Mary, Warren, R. I. 
Dick, Alyce, Auburn, Me. 
Dinsmore, Ruth, Belfast, Me. 
Duffy, Elsie, Lawrence. 
Dunnine, Ruth, Bangor, Me. 
Eames, Helen, Newtonville. 



Ehrhart, Mary, Hanover, Pa. 

Ellis, Linnie, Worcester. 

Ellsworth, Miriam, Barre. 

Epstein, Constance, Hartford, Conn. 

Farber, Berenice, Chicago. 111. 

Finegan, Margaret, Dorchester. 

Fontaine, Adrienne, Fall River. 

Fox, Phyllis, Bethlehem, N. H. 

Frick, Elizabeth, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Fuller, Lucy, Rockland, Me. 

Gagne, Pauline, Cambridge. 

Gifford, Florence, Evanston, 111. 

Gilman, Muriel, Boston. 

Gleason, Mabel, Carthage, N. Y. 

Godard, Mary, Hartford, Conn. 

Godley, Ruth, Woodfords, Me. 

Gottlieb, Lois, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gould, Gertrude, Pt. Washington, L. I. 

Gruhn, Rosalie, New York, N. Y. 

Hadley, Edith, Arlington. 

Hall, Margaret, Meredith, N. H. 

Hammell, Olga, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Harriman, Florence, Sandy Point, Me. 

Hart, Edna, Winthrop, Mass. 

Harvey, Esther, Newton Centre. 

Heath, Verna, Worcester. 

Hendee, Anna, Augusta, Me. 

Hessin, Phyllis, Stamford, Conn. 

Hibbard, Eleanor, Dorchester. 
Hight, Ruth, Ashmont. 
Hills, Ruth, Newton Highlands. 
Hinshaw, Helen, Kansas City, Mo. 
Hopkins, Ruth, Ft. Fairfield, Me. 
Hug-gins, Mira, Lockport, N. Y. 
Irish, Elizabeth, Buckfield, Me. 
Jaffe, Naomi, Birmingham, Ala. 
Jagger, Marjorie, Sanford. Me. 
Johnson, Ruth, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Junkins, Ruth, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Kellogg, Lucy, Hallowell, Me. 
Knox, Katharine, Connellsville, Pa. 
Krakauer, Bertha, Chihuahua, Mexico. 
Lalley, Catherine, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Lalley, Christine, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Landon, Helen, Park Ridge, N. J. 
Levi, Sylvia, Port Chester, N. Y. 
Lightbody, Helen, Rochester, N. H. 
Lonval, Margaret, Swampscott. 



16 LASELL 

Lougee, Doris, Laconia, N. H. 

Lowell, Marjorie, Marlboro. 

Lummus, Isabel, Lynn. 

Lunn, Betty, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Lunny, Olive, Wakefield. 

MacKay, Jean, Athol. 

Markert, Ida, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Matteson, Jessie, Chicago, 111. 

May, Dorothy, New York, N. Y. 

Mehaffey, Blanche, Port Chester, N. Y. 

Meloon, Cathleen, Portsmouth, N. H. 

Meritt, Antoinette, Dorchester. 

Merrick, Jeannette, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Merriman, Lillian, Louisville, Ky. 

Merwin, Dorothy, Windsor, Conn. 

Miller, Mary Ann, Indianapolis, Ind, 

Mills, Mary, Black River Falls, Wis. 

Millspaugh, Dorothy, Walden, N. Y. 

Mitchell, Elizabeth, Norfolk, Va. 

Morong, Lillian, Portland, Me. 

Mortimer, Eva-May, Glencoe, 111. 

Mueller, E. Louisa, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Murray, Marguerite, Bangor, Me. 
McCaghey, Alice, Little Falls, N. Y. 
McCarthy, Maura, Boston. 
McDavitt, Anna, Reading. 
McDermott, Anne, Allston. 
McGee, Lillian, Cochituate. 
McGoldrick, Clare, Waltham. 
Mclntire, Helen, Las Cruces, N. Mex. 
McTaggart, Jean, Tufts College. 
Neal, Elizabeth, Lynn. 
Needham, Marjorie, Princeton. 
Niday, Margaret, Boise, Idaho. 
Norris, Lucile, Chicago, 111. 
Nowell, Elizabeth, Honolulu, Hawaii. 
OTIare, Mary, St. Elmo, 111. 
Orlady, Bonnie, Durand, Wis. 
Orr, Louise, Winchendon. 
Osborn, Priscilla, Newark, N. J. 
Palmer, Esther, Lynn. 
Parker, Claire, West Barnstable. 
Parker, Elizabeth, Maiden. 
Parker, Sylvia, Winchester. 
Parry, Lydia, Summit, N. J. 
Parry, Maria, Summit, N. J. 
Parsons, Eleanor, Brighton. 
Pearson, Dorothy, Evanston, 111. 



LEAVES 

Perry, Helen, Maiden. 

Phillips, Gertrude, Somerville. 

Phillips, Helen, Wood's Hole. 

Pinkham, Barbara, Portland, Me. 

Pizzini, Esther, San Antonio, Texas. 

Powdrell, Gertrude, Boston. 

Prentis, Norma, Allston. 

Puckett, Louise, Birmingham, Ala. 

Reardon, Helen, Brighton. 

Redman, Dorothy, E. Orange, N. J. 

Rendell, Mercedes, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Richards, Ella, Dorchester. 

Rinebold, Eleanor, Athens, Pa. 

Robbins, Ella, Springfield. 

Robinson, Marguerite, Brandon, Vt. 

Robson, Helen, Charleston, S. C. 

Royce, Frances, Somersworth, N. H. 

Saunders, Mary, Brookline. 

Schroer, Helen, Mansfield, Ohio. 

Schultz, Helen, Evansville, Ind. 

Seaman, Harriet E., W. Hartford, Conn. 

Shapin, Edyth, Louisville, Ky. 

Shaw, Kathryn, Williamsport, Pa. 

Shidler, Evelyn, South Bend, Ind. 

Sims, Charlotte, N. Stratford, N. H. 

Small, Hazel, Sagamore. 

Smith, Adrienne, Auburndale. 

Smith, Emma, White Plains, N. Y. 

Smith, Lovina, Spencer, Ind. 

Smith, Miriam, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Somerby, Edith, Watertown. 
Staples, Helen, Milford. 
Starr, Sylvia, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Stevens, Virginia, New Haven, Conn. 
Stoneman, Ruth, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Stover, Madelyn, Rockland, Me. 
Stowe, Helen, West Millbury. 
Strauss, Louise, St. Louis, Mo. 
Strifert, Helen, Sioux City, la. 
Strong, Nadine, Allston. 
Stryker, Hazel, Summit, N. J. 
Sweetland, Beryl, Natick. 
Swope, Aneta, Campello. 
Tait, Beatrice, Springfield. 
Taylor, Harriet, Stonington, Me. 
Terhune, Elsie, Fairhaven. 
Terry, Helen, Southold, N. Y. 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



Throm, Ruth, Reading, Pa. 
Titus, Louise, Dover, N. H. 
Tong, Jocelyn, Hollis, L. I., N. Y. 
Trondsen, Alfhild, Schuylerville, N. Y. 
Varney, Isabelle, E. Rochester, N. H. 
Venable, Louisa, Norfolk, Va. 
Vicary, Carolyn, Canton, Ohio. 
Virkler, Marguerite, Castorland, N. Y. 
Watters, Jessie, "New London, Conn. 
Webb, Katharine, Stamford, Conn. 
Webster, Alice, So. Natick. 
Westerhoff, Gertrude, New Haven, Conn. 
Whitaker, Madeleine, Fairhaven. 
Whitcomb, Isabelle, Essex Junction, Vt. 
Wilcox, Marjorie, Little Falls, N. Y. 
Wilcox, Maude, Westbrook, Conn. 
Wilde, Doris, No. Andover. 
Winslow, Madeline, Boston. 
Wolfe, Priscilla, Canton. 
Woodruff, Doris, E. Orange, N. J. 
Woolley, Louise, Salem. 
Wragg, Gertrude, Norwood. 
Wry, Alice, Evanston, 111. 



WOODLAND PARK 

Bancroft, Marjorie, Auburndale. 

Baxter, Maria, W. Roxbury. 

Benson, Anna, Albany, N. Y. 

Best, Natalie, Allston. 

Borden, Preble, Boston. 

Borst, Elizabeth, Newton Centre. 

Braithwaite, Katherine, Auburndale. 

Bryning, Frances, Auburndale. 

Coombs, Isabel, Belfast, Me. 

Craig, Laura, Boston. 

Cummings, Earl, Wellesley Farms. 

Cummings, Edith, Wellesley Farms. 

Curtis, Gertrude, Troy, N. Y. 

Elliott, Dorris, Auburndale. 

French, Mary, West Newton. 

French, William, West Newton. 

Gillespie, Marguerite, Watertown. 

Hambleton, Vera, Methuen. 

Hanscom, Virginia, Auburndale. 

Himelhoch, Marjean, Detroit, Mich. 

Hopkins, Lucy, Curacao, Dutch West Indies. 

Hurst, Avis, New York, N. Y. 

Jackson, Victoria, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 



Jones, Doris, Auburndale. 

Keever, Mary Elizabeth, Auburndale. 

Lambert, Norma, Cambridge. 

Lamont, Denice, No. Cohasset. 

Larrabee, Julia, Lawrence. 

Lawrence, Hazel, Lawrence. 

Lawrence, Maxine, Lawrence. 

McDonald, Gwendolyn, Ottawa, Ontario, 

Canada. 
Nelson, Albert, Brighton. 
Nelson, Thelma, Brighton. 
Parker, Eleanor, Maiden. 
Parker, Helen, Faneuil. 
Reisig, Jane, Boston. 
Rhoades, Elizabeth, Brockton. 
Smith, Dorothy, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Soule, Priscilla, Auburndale. 
Stickney, Genevieve, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 
Towle, Mona, So. Sudbury. 
Winslow, Marjorie, Auburndale. 
Winslow, Priscilla, Auburndale. 
Wood, John, Waban. 




"It seems just as though all the 'old girls' 
were getting married or engaged," declared 
a member of our Editorial Staff and, as we 
glanced over this list, Lasell's latest matri- 
monial Roll of Honor, we felt the remark was 
very timely. Dear girls, your Alma Mater 
extends hearty congratulations to the members 
of this happy company. 

On the fifteenth of June Thelma Swan be- 
came the bride of Mr. Ralph Gould. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gould will be at home after the fifteenth 
of July at 238 Lawrence St., Haverhill, Mass. 

The thirteenth of June was the wedding 
day of Carolyn Darling and Mr. Harold Clark 
Ahern. 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



The marriage of Dorothy Lewis to Mr. Os- 
car H. Pantzer on the fifth of August has been 
announced. 

Helen Lesh T7 became the bride of Dr. Leon 
C. Zerfas on the fifteenth of June. Dr. and 
Mrs. Zerfas will be at home at 706 Hunting- 
ton Ave., Boston. 

Mrs. Clara Prince Dickerman and Mr. Law- 
rence F. Dutton have announced their mar- 
riage on the twenty-first of September. 

Kathryn Craig '18 became the bride of 
Mr. David K. Rowand on the fifteenth of 
June. 

Gail Wilson '18 and Mr. Robert C. Boyn- 
ton were united in marriage on the twelfth 
of October. 

The announcement of the marriage of Eve- 
lyn Madden to Mr. Edward C. Baker has 
been received. 

Mildred Ordway '16 became the bride of 
Mr. Ralph A. Brahana on the fourth of Oc- 
tober. 

The marriage of Marguerite Hall '16 and 
Mr. Rodney W. Perkins took place on the 
second of October. 

The thirtieth of September was the wedding 
day of Miriam Day '17 and Mr. Elmer W. 
Giles. 

Florence Bell '17 became the bride of Mr. 
Henry M. Merrill on the ninth of September. 

The wedding of Julia Nelson to Mr. Vernal 
Albert Diggs was celebrated on the ninth of 
September. Mrs. Diggs was a member of the 
Domestic Science faculty in 1915-1916. 

Helen Thirkield '11 became the bride of 
Rev. Orwyn W. E. Cook on the seventh of 
October. Mr. and Mrs. Cook will be at home 
after the first of December at 5a Nuevo Mex- 
ico 101, Mexico City, Mexico. 

Helen Brimblecom and Mr. Rufus F. Har- 
rington were united in marriage on the twenty- 
first of September. 

Mrs. Pearl Luther Warner and Mr. Harry 
B. Putnam were married on the fifteenth of 
July. After August seventh Mr. and Mrs. 
Putnam will be at home at 89 Court St., West- 
field, Mass. 



Charlotte Parker '20 became the bride of 
Mr. George W. Simpson on the eighteenth of 
October. 

On the seventh of October Marguerite 
Pierce and Mr. Lauriat Lane were united in 



marriage. 



The fourth of September was the wedding 
clay of Grace Bullock '02 and Mr. Charles J. 
Gorham. 

The wedding of Helen Decker and Mr. 
Clarence M. Exley, Jr., took place on the 
twenty-eighth of September. Mr. and Mrs. 
Exley will be at home after the first of No- 
vember at 1238 Irving St., Washington, D. C. 
The marriage of Leontine Goodman '18 to 
Mr. Henry L. Thalheimer is announced. 

The twenty-first of June was the wedding 
day of Lois Perry '20, and Mr. Simpson B. 
Bowles. 

Gladys Lucas '21, became the bride of Mr. 

Robert O. Miller on the second of September. 

On the second of September Anita Hotch- 

kiss '18, became the wife of Mr. Robert D. 

Scott. 

Marion Newland and Mr. Russell S. Adams 
were united in marriage on the seventeenth 
of August. 

The thirtieth of August was the wedding day 
of Florence Jepperson and Mr. Franklin Mad- 
sen. Many will remember Mrs. Madsen as a 
member of our music faculty. 

The announcement of the marriage of Caro- 
lyn Hoitt to Mr. Harold C. McAllister has 
been received. Mrs. McAllister was at the 
head of the Domestic Science Department last 
year. 

On the fourth of October Bessie Lothrop 
and Mr. Alton R. Wells were married. 

Charlotte Whiting '16, became the bride of 
Mr. Walter T. Clark on the second of Sep- 
tember. 

The wedding of Marguerite Hardy '20, to 
Mr. Clyfton Chandler took place on the four- 
teenth of September. 

On the fourteenth of October Lavinia Fera 
'16 and Mr. Norman McKinney were united in 
marriage. 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



Among the dear Lasell brides-to-be are the 
following : 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Helen Moss '19 to Mr. James Van B. Post, 
is received. 

The engagement of Margaret Reid '22, to 
Mr. Nelson Perry, is announced. 

The engagement announcement of Annie Di- 
mond '18, to Mr. Earle S. Day, is received. 

How pleasant it was one day in late sum- 
mer, to have that bevy of old girls drop in "all 
to once." We enjoyed every moment of their 
enthusiastic call, but will not let them off as 
easily another time. All old girls take no- 
tice ! Plan when you "come home" to stay 
long enough to "break bread" with us. 

Dear Marion Bodwell Lesher '21 and her 
precious edible little son ! How we longed to 
have them settle right down in our midst ! But 
Marion's gracious husband was hardly good- 
natured enough for any such arrangement and 
long before we were ready, the trio started off 
in their auto for the mountains of North Caro- 
lina. Lasell's blessing follows them. 

Helen Adams '22 did not return at the 
opening of school as we had hoped she would, 
but sent a splendid representative in Kather- 
ine Knox, one of our new girls. Helen and 
her family, by this time, must be on their 
island home in the Gulf of Mexico. She closes 
her fine letter with regards to Miss Wither- 
bee and the rest of the faculty. 

During the summer Hazel Brady '17 sent a 
cordial letter to our Principal regretting that 
she was unable to join her class at their fifth 
reunion and also telling us she has moved to 
Montclair, N. J., and enjoys her new home 
very much. 

Miss Witherbee and Miss Tuttle are having 
a delightful sabbatical year. Miss Witherbee 
is resting at her country home in Laurel, Dela- 
ware. Miss Tuttle has spent the summer 
among the New England lakes and is plan- 
ning to be with friends in Florida for the 
winter. Lasell's loving good wishes follow 
them. 

What a representative group of the Class 
of 1922 was here to help us in the opening 



of the school year! Among them were Dor- 
othy Moore, Josephine Holbrook, Ethelle 
Cleale, Violet Comley, Ana Clark, Louise Jack- 
son, Eleanor Knight, Helen Crawford, Flor- 
ence Day, Cornelia Hemingway, Mabel Raw- 
lings, Mildred Knight '21, Louise Stevens, 
Olive Whitehead, Beulah Coward Bresee, Ruth 
Smith '21, Marjorie Tirrell, Frances Buchan- 
an, and Doris Brown '21. Naomi Davis, Mar- 
jorie Gifford and Harriet Case not only as- 
sisted in this opening, but remained with us 
and are doing faithful work, Marjorie at 
Lasell, Naomi and Harriet at the Woodland 
Park School. 

The newest "old girls" will be interested to 
read the names of the successful candidates 
for Senior Class officers: President, Louise 
Puckett; Vice President, Anna Bullock; Sec- 
retary, Mercedes Rendell ; Treasurer, Florence 
Boehmcke; Song Leader, Helen Lightbody; 
and Cheer Leader, Rosalie Gruhn. 

Ruth Davis '20 and a friend have also called 
during these opening days. Ruth is a busy 
business woman in Boston. 

Loyal Louise Cave tells us she is busy taking 
a business course at Bryant and Stratton's 
School. 

In July Irene Lederer '17 closed her bond 
deal with Lasell and also sent the interesting 
news that her sister has a darling baby girl, 
a future Lasell student. 

Blessed little newcomers, how glad Lasell 
is to welcome them, boys and girls alike, for, 
of course, we expect every girl to enter Lasell 
later on and, for their sakes and ours, hope 
the boys will all enroll at Tech, Harvard, or 
nearby schools. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hallberg (Marg- 
herita Dike TO) a son, Kenneth Hallberg. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Grover (Doris 
Rogers '20) a girl, Marilyn Grover. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Fred Almon Stone (Lena 
Kelley '14 ) a daughter, Patricia Anne Stone. 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. Dean Corley (Marion 
Ordway '11) a son. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Oramel E. Haney (Caro- 
line Lindsay '20) a son, Richard Gwathmey 
Haney. 



^ 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



To Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Baker (Isa- 
belle Adams '19 ) a son, Donald Thayer Baker. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Feschke (Doris Camp- 
bell '20) a daughter. 

To Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Thompson, Jr. 
(Frances Heath '20) a daughter, Virginia 
Thompson. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George S. Reynolds 
(Gratia deZouche '14) a daughter, Susanne 
deZouche Reynolds. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Francis C. Wilbur (Helen 
Ver P. Selkirk '18) a son, Rodney Selkirk 
Wilbur. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Leonard P. Wolfe (Pris- 
cilla Alden '19) a son, Alden Brewster Wolfe. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Walter K. Grant (Mil- 
dred Synder '10) a daughter, Mildred Eliza- 
beth Grant. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John B. Findlay (Vera 
Bradley '11) a son, John Bradford Findlay, 

To Mr. and Mrs. Burtis E. Dresser (Ruth 
Burnap '17) a son, Burtis Burnap Dresser. 

To Mr. and Mrs. George Parker (Mildred 
Johnston '06) a daughter, Patricia. 

That last message in August from Charlotte 
Ryder '08 to Dr. Winslow, is worth quoting. 
She writes, "I have seen quite a number of 
the girls (Maine) who were at the luncheon 
and they are quite enthusiastic about the Club. 
I hope that we will be able to get a good lot 
of them together during the winter. Two 
weeks ago I went over to Bridgton to see Julia 
DeWitt Read TO. We did have such a good 
'gossipy' time together, and I think we must 
have mentioned every person that ever went 
to Lasell. I remained three days. She has 
the nicest husband and two darling boys ; Jule 
seems to have changed the least of almost any 
of my friends. On the train coming home I 
saw Miss Rand. I could hardly believe my 
eyes at first, for the last I heard of her she 
was in Ohio. I hope that the coming year will 
be a very happy and prosperous one for both 
you and Lasell." 

Elsie Doleman '14 made a real visit at La- 
sell the other day. She was enthusiastic 



about her summer in Europe. Travel evi- 
dently agrees with her for she never looked 
better. 

Myrtle Hewson Parker '99 called in August. 
She was a most welcome guest. We were 
sorry to learn from her that her sister (Lotta 
Hewson Green '02) died in June, leaving two 
little children, a boy and girl. 

We have her word for it that Leota Fulton 
had a very pleasant and happy summer at 
Woodmont, Conn. She is still working in the 
office of her brother and is learning many in- 
teresting points on insurance. She is plan- 
ning a visit with Doris Whitney '20 at Leo- 
minster, will go to Providence, R. I., for 
Thanksgiving, and has promised to visit 
Lasell. She asks especially for our new 
student, Miss Westerhoff, from New Haven, 
who is evidently a friend of hers. 

Virginia Walter '22, spent the summer at 
Lake Placid Club in the Adirondacks in New 
York, and sent a very beautiful picture with 
greetings to our Preceptress. 

Among our new students is Carolyn Vicary, 
sister of Grace '07 and Marguerite. Marguer- 
ite brought her to Lasell and during her stay 
was visited by Lucy Reilly who we were 
pleased to learn has located in Cambridge, 
Mass., where she is busily engaged in office 
work. 

How dear and evasive is that Phyllis Rowe 
'19. Twice she has been in Boston and called 
up our Preceptress, but was unable either time 
to "come home" to Lasell. The latest and 
finest news of Phyllis is that she has been 
made head of the Department of Dietetics of 
the Nurses' Department, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Ruth Gilmore Zipf was recently the guest 
of Bonnie Orlady. She certainly gave a very 
happy report of her new Chicago home and 
naturally is very enthusiastic over Mr. Zipf. 

In the late summer Henna Schweitzer '21 
with her father, mother and sister, called at 
the school. We were fortunate enough to be 
here to receive them and seldom have we wel- 
comed a more enthusiastic and loyal Lasell 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



girl than this recent graduate. They were mak- 
ing an extended motoring trip through New 
England. 

Helen Merrill Strohecker '16 has written 
recently for a baby book for her little Nancy. 
She was home for a delightful visit in Vermont 
this summer and asks if we know "that Marion 
Lerch Hunt '16 has a small son, Edward Lerch 
Hunt, born just two weeks before my Nancy?" 
Helen makes us very glad by promising to join 
her class for its tenth reunion. 

The Oak Bluffs Gazette for August 31st 
contains two interesting notices of our Miss' 
Packard. One was a complimentary reference 
to her series of Bible Interpretations which she 
gave at Oak Bluffs during the conference. This 
summer Miss Packard also celebrated the 50th 
anniversary of the Packard's family settling 
at Oak Bluffs. The occasion was very unique 
and enjoyable and brought together many rela- 
tives and distinguished friends. 

Josephine Fish Pendergast, in a letter to 
our Preceptress, gives a charming glimpse of 
her country home. She writes, "We are living 
on a big farm and for some time I have been 
making about forty pounds of butter a week. 
That is a new experience for me." We are 
proud of Josephine and especially of her 
successful and practical handling of this unique 
situation. Our girls are following more and 
more the line of the country and we learn 
from others that Josephine's farm house is a 
place of unusual charm. 

Betty Lunn sent a very attractive picture 
to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow from Rome, Italy, 
when she was there this summer. 

Ruth Adams Whiston and her husband 
called at the Seminary early in the school 
year. Mr. Whiston is one of the editors con- 
nected with the Buffalo Express and promised 
to give Lasell occasionally a word of friendly 
notice in his popular paper. When we looked 
into Ruth's youthful face we found it diffi- 
cult to believe that seventeen years have passed 
since she was a Lasell girl. 

Mrs. Barris and her party, which included 
Marjorie Kunkel '18 and Dorothy Hopper '19, 



are enthusiastic over their delightful summer. 
On this trip abroad they met Edna Christen- 
son and her sister, Emma Christenson William- 
son, and Margrethe Bauman '15 on one of 
the Rhine steamers. In Venice they ran across 
Dorothy Raymond and in London, Betty Lunn, 
At Chateau Thierry the party visited the 
Methodist Memorial which is in charge of Dr. 
and Mrs. Julian Wadsworth, loyal friends of 
Lasell and Miss Potter. Just before school 
opened Dorothea Strain called upon Mrs. Bar- 
ris. She was graduated from the University 
of California in June, and is to take Post Grad- 
uate work at Radcliffe this winter which means 
we hope we shall have the opportunity of see- 
ing her at her former school home. Mrs. 
Barris also received an interesting letter from 
her former Lasell schoolmate Marie Gibert 
'03. She writes, "whom do you suppose I 
saw at Columbia? Edith McClure Patterson 
'02 and her husband and boy, all students at 
the college. Louise Gibert Martin's husband 
has been in New York opening a branch office. 
We trust that this means that Louise will come 
East and run out to Lasell. Louise Wadley 
Bedall had a fine trip this summer up the 
coast to Portland, Oregon, and Seattle. She 
was gone six weeks." 

Just before the opening of school our Pre- 
ceptress received a touching message from 
dear Anna Blackstock '06, announcing the 
passing away of her mother which occurred 
early in the summer. She writes, "at the close 
of my furlough Isabel and the twins returned 
with me to India, where we had a very lovely 
reunion, children and grand-children with 
mother. After conference I received my ap- 
pointment to Budson and mother came to live 
with me. It was very providential she came, 
for after two days of feeling tired, mother 
passed away on "Mother's Day." She went 
to sleep and never wakened again on this 
earth. It was such a sacred privilege to have 
her with me during the last months of her 
life." Lasell's tenderest sympathy is ex- 
tended to the dear Blackstock sisters in India 
and to Isabella Blackstock Beardsley '03 who 
has returned to her New Jersey home. Anna 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



further adds, "I am enjoying my work, have 
136 girls in school as boarders and they are 
all lovely. I also teach because I enjoy it. In 
fact, I am mother, counsellor, mentor, teacher 
in one. I have ten teachers and a matron so 
don't think I am worked to a frazzle ! What 
pleasant recollections and memories I have of 
last June, at Lasell, how good all '06 and you 
folks at Lasell were to me. I am happy to be 
serving the Master out here. This winter we 
just happened to come across a Miss Watson 
'80 who was visiting in India and in my sta- 
tion." This is especially interesting news to 
our Preceptress as Miss Watson was one of 
her classmates, and the class has never heard 
from her since the day of her graduation until 
now. Anna also acknowledges the annual con- 
tribution from the Lasell Missionary Society. 
She sends her love to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, 
Miss Genn, Mrs. Hilbourn, and others who re- 
member her. She sends her special love to her 
classmates and closes with saying, "Don't you 
think our class was the best? Dear old '06! 
Now don't say NO." 

Lasell recently received the sad tidings of 
our Miss Mullikin's bereavement. Early in 
September her beloved mother, Mrs. Katharine 
Clark Mullikin, passed away at the country 
home of her daughter, Mrs. H. H. Lowry in 
Peitaiho, China. Lasell remembers gratefully 
Mrs. Mullikin's loyal interest in our school. 
Although a woman of advanced years she was 
to the end alive to all the important interests 
of the day. We recall distinctly a fine article 
from her pen which appeared only a few years 
ago in the Boston Transcript, under the cap- 
tion, "Personal Reminiscences of Wendell 
Phillips." 

Ruth Talcott Britton's friends will be 
shocked and saddened to learn of the sudden 
death of her husband, Mr. Charles O. Britton. 
which occurred September 19th. Mr. Britton 
was a very prominent and successful business 
man and was apparently enjoying good 
health. He was seized suddenly with heart 
failure and passed away without a moment's 
warning. 

On September 17th occurred the death of 



Mary Bernice Vance '99 after a brief illness. 
She was at the time in her Melrose home. 
Miss Vance had been an earnest student, tak- 
ing a course at Harvard after leaving Lasell. 
Later, she became interested in social work and 
was secretary of the Massachusetts Society 
for Social Hygiene. 

Dear Ethel Hook and her family are mourn- 
ing the loss of their beloved mother whose 
death occurred at their home October 6th. 
Lasell's tenderest sympathy is extended to 
these bereaved friends. 

While Gladys Lawton '11 and Margaret 
Thacher were at Moosehead Lake this summer 
they saw Julia Crafts TO who was very busy 
managing her father's store. Nevertheless, 
Julia dropped her cares and responsibilities to 
talk over Lasell and accompanied the girls on 
a glorious trip into the woods of Maine. Later, 
Gladys and Margaret dropped in at Lasell on 
their way home. We were delighted to wel- 
come them. 

An invitation to the opening of the new 
home of the Judson Health Center in New 
York City has been received. We notice on 
the Board of Directors Dr. Harry Emerson 
Fosdick and Bailey B. Burritt. This up-to- 
date and splendid department in community 
service is largely under the management of 
Fraulein Heinrich. We congratulate our 
former instructor on having such an important 
part in this forward movement. 

The girls of Mrs. Loom's's clay will all be 
interested to extend felicitations to her and her 
older son, Mr. Francis Wheeler Loomis and 
his bride, whose wedding day was July 24th. 
The bride was Miss Edith L. Smith, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Alpheus D. Smith of Concord. 
Mass. 

During the summer, Grace Holmes Stiles 
found her way back to Lasell. Grace was here 
in 1892-5. Her daughter is an honor student 
at Smith, and her niece has received a similar 
distinction at Wheaton. 

Barbara Smith '22 is continuing her vocal 
work with Mme. Ferrabini in Boston, and 
piano, under the supervision of Maestro Jac- 
chia at the conservatory. 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Shortly before the opening of school, 
Catherine and Emma Murchinson '21 and 
Hazel Morrison '21 "dropped in." What 
travellers these South Americans are ! The 
dear sisters had been at home in Brazil, had 
crossed the continent and made a visit on Aida 
Beeche at her home in Chile, "whipped over" 
to the states, and were just leaving for Eu- 
rope. They gave us a very pleasant picture 
of Aida at home and her domestic ability in 
managing that home. How like old times it 
seemed to see these three girls together, all of 
them "well and happy." 

The president of our Alumnae Association 
is still going from "glory unto glory." A Bos- 
ton Daily recently gave a picture of Evelyn 
Schmidt '14 and a most interesting sketch of 
her trip to the National Dental Association at 
Los Angeles. In the spring we said she was 
going. We have now the great joy of report- 
ing that she bore away from that convention 
the first prize because of her splendid exhibit, 
showing clinics, operating, models illustrating 
the relation of food to strong teeth, etc. We 
have just pride in Evelyn's every added 
success. 

Mrs. Martin is taking a Sabbatical year and 
it seemed indeed strange and out of order to 
launch the school without her inspiring god- 
speed. We may be sure, however, this dynam- 
ic member of our faculty is not idle. She has 
purchased one of the most attractive apartment 
houses in Back Bay, Boston, Tetlow Hall, and 
under her efficient management has it filled 
with a delightful company of educators and 
business patrons and has a long waiting list. 
Girls who were with us Commencement time 
last year or who are subscribers to the Leaves 
will remember Mrs. Martin's generous offer 
at the Alumnae meeting viz "she would give 
her services during the year to clubs and the 
fund raised would be for the benefit of the 
Lasell Endowment fund." One of the young 
women who was wise enough to avail herself 
of this gracious overture on the part of Mrs. 
Martin was Josephine Fish Pendergast of the 
North Conway, N. H., Woman's Club. Mrs. 
Martin is on the program for guest night and 



will give her inimitable reading "If I Were 
King." Lasell girls living in the vicinity of 
North Conway might take notice and possibly 
could secure the speaker for a program of the : r 
own and in this way do their share in building 
up the growing Endowment fund. 

In the last letter received from Mabelle 
Whitney '03 she speaks of attending the Maine 
Conference of Women Preachers. Mabelle is 
greatly enjoying her rural work as circuit rid- 
er in the state of her adoption. One of our 
old girls who was a member of her parish 
speaks in the most kindly manner of her work. 
Mabelle writes of meeting Sarah Hughes 
Forbes '03, one of her classmates, and was sur- 
prised to learn that she had lost her husband. 
In addition to her regular work Mabelle has 
become the Local Leader for the Boys' and 
Girls' Club. 

A dear note was received by our Preceptress 
from Margaret Reid '22 who is still living 
with her uncle and aunt at the Hotel Edge- 
mere, East Orange, N. J., but in another 
column you will find that Margaret is not to 
make this her permanent home. She sends 
special love to the new Seniors and best wishes 
for all kinds of success to Lasell ! 

During the summer Mr. and Mrs. Parley A. 
Lord were kind enough to call at Lasell. They 
gave an enthusiastic account of their daughter, 
Marion Lord Cobb. We were glad to get 
good news through them of Marion. 

Marcelline Freeman Jones and her little 
daughter, Dorothy, were here in August last. 
It really seemed to us that Marcelline d'-d not 
look one day older than when she was a stu- 
dent at Lasell in 1906-7 and yet she is the 
mother of three dear children, Dorothy Alden, 
Chester, Jr., and Marcelline. 

Of all the attractive pictures which have 
come into the Leaves Editorial office none is 
more winsome than the one just received of 
Mary Elizabeth Hubbard '20 and her adorable 
six-months old niece, Jean Geary Hubbard. 
Mary is now enjoying her senior year at Le- 
land Stanford University in Palo Alto. She 
writes, "It is such a beautiful peaceful spot, 
ideally located in the Santa Clara Valley, one 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



hour from San Francisco. The buildings are 
typically Californian, being the mission style, 
and in marked contrast with the lovely old 
buildings of Lasell. You can't guess how 
many times I have rejoiced that I spent a year 
at Lasell. It all seems so near and I shall be 
glad to attend my class reunion in 1925. The 
year following my graduation I spent at home 
doing a half day's work in the Library of the 
International Institute of the Y. W. C. A. in 
East Los Angeles. My part was among the 
little Spanish and Italian children. They were 
so dear I wished for Senora Orozco's fluency 
in Spanish. I attended the 1921 meeting of 
the South California Lasell Club, when we 
were honored by Miss Packard's as well as 
Dr. Bragdon's presence. I regretted missing 
this year's meeting which was held in Pasa- 
dena. Helen Moss '19 wrote to me from 
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, that 
she was enjoying the beauties by horseback. 
We have been spending this summer on Cata- 
lina Island and next summer plan to go to 
Honolulu. My major subject at Stanford is 
English and I am enjoying the work very 
much. I was pledged and initiated into Pi 
Beta Phi. Katharine Van Fleet has been pri- 
vate secretary to the State Auditor in the 
State House of Columbus, Ohio. I was so 
glad to hear of Eloise Carey's '20 position at 
the school. What would one ever do without 
the Leaves to bring news of old friends? I 
am enclosing one dollar for the Leaves sub- 
scription, and one to start the Missionary So- 
ciety Christmas fund." (Dear Mary, in this, 
you are starting something quite new and 
worthwhile. Thank you.) Mary closes her 
splendid letter by sending her best wishes for 
the school and kind regards to those who re- 
member her. 

As we were privileged to glance over Jean 
MacKay's fine letter to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
we exclaimed to ourselves, "This Jean ought to 
be writing for publication." Almost every word 
of her letter is worth sharing with a large circle 
of friends. Her descriptions of Montana and 
its unique features are fine and her statements 



concerning the business problems of her na- 
tive state are indeed quite statesman-like. For 
example, she writes, "you have no doubt heard 
me say this before, but I repeat, this is not 
a farming state. It is a splendid stock state, 
but it is too dry to farm and too far from 
market to do much with the advised 'diversi- 
fied farming.' We can not compete with an 
Iowa farmer with his corn fed hogs. Corn 
may grow here but it is far from being an 
assured crop, and hogs like heat and do not 
grow as fast, or put on fat, as they do in the 
states that have longer hot seasons. The range 
has been destroyed by land cultivation, and 
unless one can raise a carload or two of cattle 
or sheep it does not pay, as there is no local 
consumption for the fattened animal. Omaha 
and Chicago are our markets, and that means 
from a thousand to fifteen hundred miles to 
travel, and the shrinkage and freight 
cut profits more than one would believe. 
Sheep, to our minds, are still the best thing 
in sight. Wool is always a 'cash in hand' 
affair. I think every farmer feels that this 
wheat speculation should stop. He works from 
daylight to dark, and a number of speculators 
that may never have seen a wheat field 
squabble in Chicago and tell him what he shall 
receive for it." The whole letter indicates 
that our Jean is, in Mrs. Martin's words, 
"alive in soul, in mind, and body," and yet 
she wisely takes time to keep in touch with 
good up-to-date literature. She declares our 
Miss Witherbee "has been a veritable 'book 
angel' to me during these years." I fear Pro- 
fessor Hills would perish if he heard me, but 
I find hours of pleasure while tearing up Mr. 
McDowell's 'Wild Rose' by the roots." 

During Miss Potter's flying trip out West 
this summer she had an unusually pleasant 
meeting with Rebecca Shepherd '94 and her 
father at the Evanston home, or rather most 
of the visit was in Mr. Shepherd's unusually 
attractive garden. Rebecca had just received 
her degree from Chicago University. Lasell's 
congratulations to this forward move on the 
part of our alumna. 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



DR. BRAGDON'S BIRTHDAY 



"Lasell is the dearest place of which I 
know for you to spend your birthday," so 
wrote Sade Hollingsworth Thompson to our 
Principal Emeritus who this year did 'keep his 
anniversary' at the old school home. Those 
of us who were privileged to be at Lasell 
September 6th, will not soon forget Dr. Brag- 
don's birthday with all the sunshine, real and 
figurative, which crowded its hours. Some- 
how that Lasell Club of New York is quite 
apt to lead off in extending felicitations to our 
Principal Emeritus. A most beautiful and 
costly gift was sent by them to Dr. Bragdon. 
Grace Huntington '89 did the honors for 
the Club accompanying the gift with a gra- 
cious and fitting expression of appreciation 
from his New York 'old girls'. Greetings of 
affection came to Dr. Bragdon from relatives, 
quite a number of his pupils, teachers, and 
Lasell folk who were 'let into the secret.' 
Mrs. Bragdon received her share of the 
congratulations and good wishes. Mrs. 
Martin's message to the 'grand old man' 
was characteristic, and her unique gift 
enjoyed by all the birthday party. From 
a devoted member of the office corps 
came a box of his favorite red roses. 
Annie Kendig Peirce '80, Carrie Kendig Kel- 
logg 79, Lucy Curtis '80, Lillian Packard '83, 
and Lillie Potter '80, sent greetings from the 
girls of some time ago. When Mrs. Whitney's 
dear message was read, we all lovingly and 
tenderly began to 'talk over' old Lasell times 
and her sister, our beloved Miss Nutt. There 
was one message from overseas, for Winnie 
Ewing Coffin '89 did not forget the day. Mrs. 
Mary Ransom Wagner and Martha Ransom 
were the hostesses, and that accounted for a 
lot of the happy happenings, the crowning 



feature of which was a generous birthday 
cake, enjoyed by all Lasell's summer family." 
We would like to quote verbatim Miss Wither- 
bee's fine letter which, as usual, scintillated 
with wit and wisdom but, even at this safe 
distance, we dare not venture. Thousands of 
Dr. Bragdon's former students will join with 
Miss Witherbee in this tribute to her former 
principal : "Possibly you do not reflect, would 
not even credit it, were you told, how many 
there are today, and in how many corners of 
the world, to whom your name is one to be 
remembered with genuine affection, your oddi- 
ties with tender amusement, your counsels 
with respect and gratitude. To these who so 
remember you it seems great that your day 
and theirs overlapped, that they might know 
you and have your friendship." It seems fit- 
ting to close this word of appreciation with 
Maude Simes Harding's '06 own lines to Dr. 
Bragdon. 

"From green to gold ; from gold to richer tints, 
The deeping day of early autumn hints ; 
Then, gathered by the fireside's cheerful blaze, 
To meet the growing chill of winter days 
The mind reverts, in reminiscent mood 
Fondly upon the summertime to brood. 
There in the dancing shadows of the room 
The cherished flowers of life's garden bloom. 
The little blossoms, sweetening the air, — 
Small kindnesses, the doer unaware 
Of all the fragrances his actions stirred — 
The larger flowers, the tender, greeting word. 
All through the years, to meet life's every need, 
The yield of beauty grew the perfect seed, 
And as the flame ascends the chimney vent, 
Bearing abroad the forest's subtle scent, 
So for all time wafts onward o'er the earth 
The influence of one life's precious worth. 
Content, indeed, the heart may rest secure 
Knowing that all it hoped for will endure. 

And may you know content of the deepest, 
most comforting kind, for you have earned it." 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



JOKES 

Judge — "What is your occupation?" 
Sam — "I'se de manager ob de family laun- 
dry, sah !" 

Judge — "What is the name of the laundry?" 
Sam — "Eliza, yo' honor!" 



Miss Woodward making an announcement, 
"This afternoon I'll take some girls for a walk 
to Norumbega. Maybe we'll find some nuts 
there." 



Frantic Tourist — "Send out the service 
truck. I've turned turtle." 

Garage Man — "Pardon sir, this is a garage, 
not an aquarium." 



An Irish policeman brought in a man for 
speeding. 

The Judge said, "Well, Patrick, did the de- 
fendant offer any resistance?" 

"Yes, yer honor, but 'twas only half a dol- 
lar and I wouldn't even look at it." 



Author — "Well the evening wore on." 
Friend— "It did, eh? What did it wear?" 
Author — "If you must know, the close of a 
summer day." 



She (coyly) "Now own up — -You know you 
men like talkative women better than the other 
kind." 

He— "What other kind ?" 



Mr. Towne — "Why do you go to school, 
Miss Curry?" 

Jo — "Well, I don't know, it has sorta be- 
come a habit !" 



French conjugation of verb "to smile' 
Je me grin 
Tu te giggle 
II se laugh 
Nous nous crackions 
ous vous splitiez 
lis se burst. 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



smm^mmmMi 



' -;-.'; BAKER'S: * 

1 CARACAS. SWEET 

CHOCOLATE 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 

Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 




« #iade By ,*•,-.. 

WALTER BAKERS, CO. LTD. 

DORCHESTER.MASS. 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Belter Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



New York 
394 Fifth Ave. 



Boston 
161 Tremont St. 
164 Tremont St. 




Philadelphia 

1311 Walnut St. 



At Christmas 

YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of fiiendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the repioduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
gi aph for Christmas ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




ax Brothers 

TtoK/STS 

Glljmre l&asts, WxaUts mt> ©rrijtfcs 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 



44 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON 



CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 

FOR 

REAL SERVICE 

Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 

A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 


STUDENTS! 

WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 

SCHOOL v 

SUPPLIES 

THINK OF 

^- <?^o"?~^^ of Boston J 

THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON |7| SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 


A FRIEND 


L P. Hollander £o. 

Established 1848 

NEW ATTRACTIVE 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 


Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 
57 and 58 N. Market St. Boston 


202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 




All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 1 % South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



QUALITY -4 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



O. S. REED 
Sampler 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 

Agent for Wallham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

ffluatr SralrrB 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

Thatis always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

Thatis priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fre>h, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH. 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



(jouxrile 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON. MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 

Inc. 

FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 

364 BoylstOn Street ArlinJonStreet 

Established 1858 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 




SMART 

WALKING - 
SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 
ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON, Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., Boston 

Telephone Rich. 820 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Recipes 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 






Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - ■ $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E.J Monetise, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



F. Capodanno & Sons 

AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone. Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 

College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 





' *&&* ■' 



——DUTCH — 

cnocoL/n 



Wfyf. M.' FLANDEflS 
. BOSTON DiSTRiaCaS 



Invalids 
and 

convales- 
cents 
thrive on 
it 

The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 




LASELL LEAVES 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS 



SPECIAL 
$10.00 




LENGTH 

24 
INCHES 



INDESTRUCTIBLE PARISIAN PEARL NECKLACES 



BAR PIN 
$5.00 

I4K Gold Set with Genuine 
Sapphire 



mmnw * 



^^■■■^'.■Vi'fT-' j tL'i 



mAxxx&wmM. 



uMM£$T 



BAR PIN 
$10.00 

18K White Gold with Yellow 

Gold Gallery. Set with Cut 

Diamond — a Bargain 



SWEATER SET 
$6.50 

Parisian Pearls set so that they 
will not get loose or come off 



WRIST WATCH 
$50.00 

1 4K Gold Case— Full Jeweled 
Movement 





39*41 

SUMMER SI 

JEWELEKb JsSrW 





Vol. XXXXVIII 



No. 2 



JANUARY, 1923 



LASELL LEAVES 



^ag it mxtlf Mavwxa 




(Eijarg? aransttta BolitXUb 



LASELL LEAVES 



When You have a Purchase to make 
if you cannot come to the store 

Phone Beach 3200 
and ask for our Shopping Counselor 

She is a woman of excellent taste and long shopping experience, and will take a 
real personal interest in shopping for you. Tell her what you want, the price you wish 
to pay, and other details — you will be pleased and satisfied with the service received. 

If you prefer to write, address your letter to Shopping Counselor, Jordan Marsh Company, Boston. 



Jordan Marsh Company 



Boston 



l^our Christmas Shopping? 

The E. T. Slattery Company did it for you in Europe weeks ago, picking 
up delightful novelties in France, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, England. 
They're all ready now — lovely gifts, bearing all the charm that distinguishes 
things imported. 

There are gifts for everybody, too, from imported silk neckties for father 
and leather cigarette cases for brother to roosters that strut and crow and 
please the children. 

All this without mentioning the host of feminine gifts — gloves, perfumes, 
handkerchiefs, dainty hand-made "undies," beaded bags, and so on ad 
infinitum — gathered together to save you the troublesome Christmas 
shopping during the precious holidays. 

E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 



Make Your Rug 
Dollars Count 




Oldest Rug House 
in America 



Linoleum Time Is Here 
This Is Linoleum Place 



EVERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
The same applies to offices and public places in general. 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the [floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



t -£T*A Qmiryy. 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



Imported Topcoats 

for College Girls 

Youthful Suits and 
Sport Hats 

Gloves 
Fine Furs 

Everything distinctive and unusual 




383 WASHINGTON ST 
BOSTON 



jkSELL fpAVES 

Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., JANUARY, 1923 N^~2 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 

LIST OF OFFICERS 

Business Manager Subscription Manager 

JOSEPHINE CURRY ARLINE ALLSOPP 

Editor-in-Chief 

HELEN L. CHAPMAN 

Joke Editor Athletic Editor 

LOUISA C. VENABLE CAROLYN S. COLTON 

Local Editors 

MARGARET BUNNELL 
MARY M. DeWOLF 

Assistant Joke Editor Literary Editor 

M. EVELYN SHIDLER ELIZABETH BRISTOW 

TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 

CONTENTS 

FRONTISPIECE 4 

LITERARY 

A Horseback Trip in the Yellowstone Ruth Hills 5 

The Drill Master - - - ■ ■ ■ E. Smith 6 

A Creative Genius M. Daugherty 6 

Christmas in Matagalpa Anna Barris 

EDITORIAL 9 

LOCALS • • 10 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 12 

LASELL CLUB MEETINGS 15 

TWO NEW LASELL CLUBS 21 

PERSONALS - • • 22 




THE FIELD HOCKEY TEAM 



\£^, 




A HORSEBACK TRIP IN THE YELLOW- 
STONE 

The Yellowstone on horseback ! Could any- 
thing" be more wonderful ! 

Sixteen girls with chaperons left New York 
the evening of June the thirtieth for the 
western town of Cody, Wyoming. We had a 
car all to ourselves and as it was always the 
last on the train, we had a wonderful chance 
to see the scenery which was constantly be- 
coming more interesting. There would be 
long stretches of sage-brush, then vast dis- 
tances of desert sand. Here and there little 
prairie dogs would stand up on their hind legs 
as the train went by as though indignant at 
being disturbed. Occasionally a desert rabbit 
would scamper from near the track or a 
prairie hen would dart out from the side of 
the road. As we went further west, high 
mountains with their peaks covered with snow, 
loomed up in the distance. 

After five nights and four days we arrived 
in Cody, and were met at the station by two 
large busses which took us across the Sho- 
shone River into the town. It was the Fourth 
of July and the cow-boys were out with their 
revolvers and lariats. There was to be a 
State Stampede in the afternoon so we hurried 
to dress in true Western style; flannel shirt, 
riding breeches, knee boots and sombrero. 

Cowboys were there from all parts of the 
state to compete for different championships. 
There were many horse races but the most 
exciting events were the bucking contests, wild 
steer-riding, bull-dogging, and calf -roping. 
The most interesting to me was the bull-dog- 
ging. The cowboy rode after the steer which 



was given a ten foot start and when the 
chance came the rider jumped from his horse 
to the steer and by twisting the animal's neck 
brought him to the ground. 

After the stampede was over we rode in 
busses to our first camping about thirty miles 
out from Cody on the North Fork road. It 
was at the side of the North Fork of the 
Shoshone River and surrounded on all sides 
by mountains. Hiawatha tepees were set up 
in a semi-circle and at one end was our cook 
tent which soon became very popular. 

The next day we spent in trying out horses 
and accustoming ourselves to the Western 
saddle and manner of riding, preparatory to 
the twenty mile ride the following day which 
would bring us to our new camp. 

Our days began when we were awakened at 
five or five-thirty. If we were near a good 
place to swim, we made a dash for the water 
which thoroughly awakened us, as it was never 
very warm ; then we dashed back to our tents 
to dress and to breakfast. As soon as break- 
fast was over we hurried to pack up and to 
take down our tents, so as to get an early start 
for the day's ride which varied from ten to 
thirty-five miles. Our lunches were put up in 
paper bags by two of the girls and each car- 
ried her own on her saddle. No matter 
whether it rained, snowed or the sun shone, 
we went just the same. 

Of course it is impossible to tell everything 
in detail but there are a few things which 
stand out clearly among all others — Old Faith- 
ful Geyser which changed its time of eruptions 
from every hour to one hour and three min- 
utes ; the Giant Geyser which at the time of 



P 



LASELL LEAVES 






our arrival was eleven days overdue and broke 
out two days later just after we had broken 
camp ; and the Morning Glory Pool which was 
formed and colored like a morning glory 
twenty-three feet in diameter and twenty-nine 
feet deep. 

Numerous bears, elk, deer, prairie dogs, 
wood-chucks, and porcupines came frequently 
around our camps. 

After six weeks of this life we arrived at 
Valley Ranch, Valley, Wyoming, where we 
were to spend our last few days. It is a won- 
derful place surrounded by high mountains 
with the South Fork of the Shoshone River 
running along one side. We had a farewell 
banquet and dance at the Ranch and the next 
morning a very sad group of girls awaited 
departure. 

We were taken in busses from Valley to 
Cody where we dressed in our travelling 
dresses and we certainly felt anything but 
natural. We had not worn skirts for nearly 
seven weeks and hated them. That night we 
went back across the river and boarded our 
train for the East and home. 

Ruth Hills. 

THE DRILL MASTER 

It had been raining all the morning and the 
cold, bleak wind was still beating against the 
window panes in the nursery. I thought how 
nice it would be if I could go out to play in- 
stead of having to sit on the floor drilling my 
tin soldiers. As last I rose and looked long- 
ingly out of the window. All of a sudden I 
saw in the distance marching toward me a 
group of husky soldiers in khaki uniforms, 
carrying guns over their shoulders. Leading 
them was a still finer man, the Captain. On 
his coat glittered many medals ; over his high 
plush hat hung silver cords ; and gold bars 
ornamented his shoulders. As the soldiers 
approached, I slid across the floor, down the 
stair-case and crept cautiously out of the door 
into the street. I was going, I knew not 
where, but anyway, out of the dull house. 



"Left! right! left! right!" For hours I 
led the steady march over hill and valley, until 
at last in the forest we suddenly distinguished 
the foe advancing toward us. 

"Company forward !" I commanded, and 
with a rush every man put forth all his strength 
until we stood face to face with the foe. 

They fired once ! Every one of my men 
returned the fire. How long we fought I do 
not know, for wounded, I fell flat upon my Ij 
face. 

The pain in my shoulders grew sharper 
every second. Just as I thought I could not 
endure it any longer, I opened my eyes, and 
found my mother shaking me and saying, 
"Tommy, Tommy, it is seven o'clock. Don't 
you care for any dinner?" 

■ E. Smith '26. 

BRUSH FIRES 

What is it 

That flickers through the lacy pines — 

That brilliant light below? 

Is it a cluster of fireflies? 

Ah no ! It is a brushfire 

A fantastic thing 

That catches the eye 

As it gracefully leaps, 

A symbol of the dying earth 

Wherein new vistas are unfolding 

A wider "Vision" — 

Isabel Varney. 

A CREATIVE GENIUS 

One of the most interesting writers of the 
present day is Amy Lowell. Her works are 
widely appreciated for their many individual, 
noteworthy qualities. Perhaps the most im- 
portant of these is her choice of material and 
literary style. She has determined that poetry 
is her natural mode of exposition so she en- 
deavors to use it in an unusual way. She 
has undoubtedly succeeded for she writes free 
verse, having rhythm but not rhyme. 

To those who do not adapt themselves 
quickly to new style and form, Amy Lowell's 
writings do not appear as real poetry. They 
miss the old-fashioned signs — rhyme and 
metre. Those making quick and easy transi- 
tions are the ones to whom her poetry appeals 
most strongly. Many who have never enjoyed 
poetry at all find exceedingly enjoyable read- 
ing between the covers of each new book. 



LASELL LEAVES 



She is industrious and studious, and these 
traits are naturally reflected in her writings. 
She has dug into Chinese which has made her 
touch most vivid. Her poems are a succession 
of pictures, simple, yet effective, and full of 
the intimate detail of daily life. This human 
quality has a stimulating effect on her readers 
as her work almost "beats" with life. 

Her vigor of mind and independent conclu- 
sions added to her imaginative power make 
everything she writes most expressive. Due 
to her industry as well as her natural gift, she 
has written six volumes of poetry, which are 
considered by some as the most creative of 
present day production ; two volumes of prose, 
one an authentic criticism on poetry, the other 
a collection of "Six French Poets" ; and trans- 
lations from Chinese poetry. Surely in some 
respects no one exceeds her ; for instance her 
love of color, fragrance, form and beauty 
everywhere ; her love of life itself makes her 
poetry all the more appealing — these qualities 
are shown in everything she writes. 

Her book "Legends" which is based on the 
folk-lore of various peoples contains "Many 
Swans," a good example of what she tried to 
do. It is the story of an Indian who, on re- 
turning from a visit to the sky, brought with 
him a bright something that dealt fire every- 
where, but the Indian could never fling it from 
him. Another interesting example of creative 
genius is her version of the old New England 
legend of Peter Rugg who is always journey- 
ing up and down New England, ever begging 
those he meets to tell him "which way to 
Boston." 

What could more vividly express the feeling 
of homesickness of the Lasell girl on her first 
journey to Boston than Miss Lowell's poem 
entitled "Nostalgia" : 

"Through pleasures and palaces — 
Through hotels and Pullman cars. . ." 
Then the fleeting vision of the home away from 
which she is being borne so swiftly suggested 
by the line : 

"Pink and white camellias floating in a 
crystal bowl." 



and suddenly to be rudely startled by the 
words of the first line of the third stanza of 
this poem : 

"Tickets, please !" 
The very suggestiveness of the titles of the 
volumes, "Dome of Many Coloured Glass" 
and "Pictures of the Floating World" puts one 
on the "qui vive" as she ventures out into the 
floating world of broader vision. 

Matilda Jane Daugherty. 



CHRISTMAS IN MATAGALPA 

Throughout the entire world the birth of 
the Christ-Child will soon be observed, but 
perhaps nowhere is there a more beautiful 
custom than that which will take place in the 
old Spanish churches of Central America. 

"Away in a manger, no crib for His bed, 

The little Lord Jesus lay down His sweet 
head." 

This lovely old carol would not tell the 
story as depicted in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, a 
tiny village, tucked away, as isolated as the 
world-known Oberammergau, for on Christ- 
mas eve in that town there is in every home 
a cradle awaiting the coming of the Christ- 
Child. 

Across the moon-lit plaza to the ancient 
cathedral, come stalwart Indians, Spaniards, 
with their great sombreros and their shirts 
flopping outside of their cotton trousers, dark 
velvety-eyed women, with trailing skirts of 
lawn and bright bodices ; children, also — a 
picturesque throng. 

As they gather they kneel before the flower- 
decked altar of the Virgin mother praying 
and awaiting the pealing of the midnight bells 
which will announce the birth of the Christ- 
Child. 

The old church is beautiful in its dignity 
and simplicity. Lighted by hundreds of can- 
dles, it is a place of brilliancy and deep soft 
shadows. The great masses of roses on the 
altar and the gay silk reboses on the heads of 
the women make brilliant pools of color in the 
soft light. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



While this service is being held, the priest, 
taking the image of the Christ-Child from its 
sacred place, gives it to his messenger and bids 
him carry it to a certain home in the town. 
No one except the priest and the messenger 
knows who is to be honored that night. Kneel- 
ing and praying, the worshippers await the 
pealing of the midnight bells, which tells them 
that the Babe has found a resting place ; then, 
with shouts of joy and expectation, they run 
first to their own home, and then in groups 
from house to house seeking the "new-born 

Babe." 

For weeks they have been preparing for the 
coming of the Christ-Child. On entering the 
adobe houses you find the long, low front room 
divided in half by a low bank of palms and 
masses of flowers ; along the sides and across 
the back the decorations were the same, only 
the palms reached to the ceiling and the flowers 
were in greater profusion. The carpet in this 
enclosure was unique and very lovely. Mat- 
ting had been wet and sprinkled with oats, 
which had sprouted and by Christmas had 
grown out three inches high, making the most 
exquisite floor covering imaginable. A path 
of flower petals led from the front of the 
room to the tall palms and flowers at the back, 
and, there festooned with tiny pink rosebuds 
and white lilies was the cradle awaiting the 
Christ-Child. Large stones had been placed 
here and there under the matting to raise it, 
and on these mountains small trees were 
placed. To make them appear like the moun- 
tains around Matagalpa they had fashioned 
little brown monkeys of clay, which were 
playing in the trees, while prowling about very 
life like, were miniature tigers and lions. 

It is not often that the Christ-Child comes 
to a pretentious home but rather to some lowly 
hearthstone, where sorrow, death, or poverty 
has been a recent guest. Very often, as last 
year, the manger child comes as a comfort 
and a guest to the home of a woman who has 
recently lost her own little child. 

Anna Barns. 



"BELLS" 

Hear the buzzing, whirring bell! 

Rising Bell! 

What a feast of rolls and jam does its jarring burr 

foretell. 
How it jingles and it jangles, 
In the icy air of morn. 
Breaks into our slumber dead, 
Drives us from alluring bed, 
Cold and shivering and forlorn, 
All our rosy dreams disturbing, 
Hear the electric-aberration that so heartlessly 

does well 
From the bell, bell, bell, bell, 

Bell, bell, bell 
From the loud and boisterous buzzing of the bell. 

Hear the clamor of the bell. 
Lights Out Bell! 

Up and down the lively halls where merry daughters 
dwell. 

How inexorably it clangs, 

Joy on frightened wings dispelling ! 

Did ever huge Nippon bell 

Toll to pleasure, such a knell, 

Fill all hearts with rude rebelling? 

Solemn girlhood, Miserere : On the night air woe 

doth swell, 
At the bell, bell, bell, bell 

Bell, bell, bell 
At the stern, impelling clamor of the bell. 

Mary Ann Miller. 
(Apologies to Edgar Allen Poe) 



THE JUNIORS' RIDE 

Listen, my children, and you shall hear 
Of the famous ride of the Juniors dear, 
On the first of November in twenty-two: 
Hardly a girl knew what to do, 
As the dreaded night of election drew near. 

Each said to her friend, "If the Seniors learn 
By Sophs or Specials our scheme tonight, 
They will stop the election and surely discern, 
That we're not very clever or really bright. 
So be sure to use force and tie with a rope, 
Any Senior you see, and don't give up hope. 
Keep wide awake and be ready to come, 
When the clock in the corridor strikes the hour, 
We'll meet at the Green store, each one on the run." 

So we all said "Goodnight" on the front corridor, 

And at last came the signal to meet at the store. 

So we ran down the stairs and out to the field 

Where the trees and the bushes served as a shield 

And ample protection from enemies near. 

We lay there and shivered trying to hide, 

'Til at length came the truck that started our ride. 

Then to Wellesley we traveled exceedingly fast 

And there our ride ended for we'd voted at last. 

Ruth St one man. 
(Apologies to H. W. Longfellow) 









3^ ^ — j^^^t 



We are indebted to the girls who were 
taught by Miss Witherbee last year for some 
of the literary material of the first and second 
issues of The Leaves. The editors will miss 
the help she gave them whenever they were 
seeking for verses, stories, essays of real 
merit. 



manger message of good-will and of the later 
one of manhood, — "He went about doing 
good." 



There is an old jingle that we knew in 
childhood, ending "For Christmas comes but 
once a year." And so it does, in one sense 
for there is only one day in all the year when 
we share the Christmas tree, the plum pudding, 
and the Christmas turkey. But the Christmas 
spirit that was brought into the world nearly 
two thousand years ago lives through our 
whole twelve months. In the life of Christ 
we find the inspiration to live in love and kind- 
liness and so we celebrate the day of His birth 
and it is our fault if we do not meet the 
inspiration in continuous appreciation of the 
Christmas spirit through the whole year. 

The New Year aptly follows Christmas, for 
there is no better time to plan our lives anew 
and to experience ourselves a new birth, cast- 
ing aside prejudices and bad habits, than after 
the flood of joy of the Christmas tide. Surely 
our gratitude for the blessings of the past 
year should make us bold in making resolu- 
tions for the new. 

Once more we have hung the holly wreaths 
and mistletoe boughs, lit the candles, and sung 
the carols. 

We look back over the intervening centuries 
and we see all about us, the import of the 



We take just pride in our nation founded 
on principles of liberty, a refuge for the op- 
pressed of other lands, — in her government, 
her institutions of learning, her churches and 
her homes. But the message emphasizes that 
it is a world-wide nation and from its strength 
it has incurred world-wide responsibilities. We 
have listened to the trumpet calls of war. It 
is for us now to listen to those of peace. 

They call us to the work lying all about us, 
tending toward the progress of humanity, the 
growth of a higher national and individual 
conscience, toward a larger and a richer life, 
a nobler and a happier one for all who heed 
the call. 

Where better can we attune our ears to re- 
ceive the message, than here in our Lasell life 
together, school and family, where through all 
our activities and experiences is emphasized 
"right preparation for service," both practical 
and ideal. 

He went about doing good and taught "Love 
one another." 

"OUR FIDDLING" 

Life, at its best is a riddle, 

A jumble of luck, good or bad. 
And our deeds are the tunes that we fiddle, 

A tune either merry or sad. 

Why not change, if our tune be dreary 
Why not fiddle an air that is gay? 

Remember we're here to be cheery, 
Not to fiddle good time away. 

/. Merrick. 




In taking their caps and gowns, the Seniors 
chose to serenade the campus just before 
dawn. The first streaks of light glowed in the 
east giving a ghostlike appearance to their 
procession as they moved along humming 
softly an old English ballad. The serenade 
was adapted from "Roses of Picardy" and 
the clear voices carried its exquisite harmony 
to enraptured listeners at the windows. 

The recollection of this night will be treas- 
ured by Seniors and under-classmen alike as 
one of the unforgettable memories of our 
Alma Mater. 

The Sophomores held their first meeting on 
the afternoon of November 1st, choosing for 
their officers : Catherine Lalley, President ; 
Mary Saunders, Vice-President ; Helen Lan- 
don, Secretary ; Betty Parker, Treasurer ; 
Teddy Harvey, Song and Cheer Leader. 

The Juniors elected the following officers : 
Bertha Krakauer, President ; Frances Badger, 
Vice-President ; Kay Webb, Secretary ; Edith 
Hadley, Treasurer ; Gertrude Wragg, Cheer 
Leader ; Helen Schroer, Song Leader. 

November 2nd the Freshmen elected as offi- 
cers: Betty Lunn, President; Helen Mcln- 
tyre, Vice-President ; Barbara Cushing, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer ; Jessie Matteson, Cheer 
and Song Leader. 



We celebrated Hallowe'en, Saturday night, 
in the good old fashioned way — that is, by hav- 
ing a masquerade. No onlooker will ever say 
that Lasell girls lack in any sort of originality 
— all possible rig-ups were worn — and some 
impossible ones. The fancy dances (given by 
request) were worth having lived some seven- 
teen or eighteen years to see. Everybody had 
the usual glorious time and slept extra long 
Sunday morning to make up her beauty-sleep 
having lost much of both the night before. 

The Christian Endeavor Society has had as 
leaders Harriet Case, Anna Bullock, Josephine 
Curry, Elizabeth Frick and Beatrice Tait who 
have given us inspiring little talks at the meet- 
ings "after dinner." 

November 18th, the Hampton Institute 
Quartet entertained us most pleasingly by 
singing the old plantation melodies, America's 
only folk songs. Some of the camp-meeting 
words were certainly funny, though they were 
evidently taken most seriously by the soloist. 
One of the loveliest songs was, "Swing Low, 
Sweet Chariot," in which their voices seemed 
to swing with the chariot that was "comin' for 
to carry me home." 

While the quartet rested, a graduate of the 
Institute spoke to us of the work the alumni 
are doing and the manager explained to us 
how the harmonies were worked out. It was 
a unique and enjoyable entertainment. 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



One of Lasell's greatest athletic victories 
this year was that in which our team tri- 
umphed, after a hard fought battle, against 
the famous Faculty team. 

One reason why victory has been so much 
commented upon is that Lasell is the only 
hockey team to have beaten the Faculty this 
year ! Another fact that might well make us 
thank our stars for victory was that their mad- 
dening cheers and songs utterly overwhelmed 
most of ours and seemed to redouble the speed 
and strength of their team. 

At the dinner afterwards, when we enter- 
tained our rivals, the Lasell girls were calm 
though triumphant in the face of the enemy, 
singing nothing but songs of cheer and praise 
to the more-or-less defeated ones, which were 
returned in measure full and running over. 

The Vesper Service of November 19th was 
held around the fireplace of the chapel. 
The girls brought pillows and sat Turk- fashion 
around the flames. Mrs. E. M. Taylor spoke 
of the need of sympathy and help in the North 
End of Boston, described so vividly by Mary 
Antin in her book, "The Promised Land." 
Mrs. Taylor has lived in Boston many years 
and pictured vividly the life of the tenements 
and the ways in which one can help the un- 
fortunate people who live there. 

Our Christmas Vesper Service of Sunday, 
December 10th, was one long to be remem- 
bered by the audience which filled to over- 
flowing the chapel. The members of the 
Glee Club, dressed in white filled the stage, 
while the rest of the student body marched in 
as usual with the processional hymn. Miss 
Potter's opening prayer touched all hearts by 
the directness and beauty of its Christmas ap- 
peal. Dr. Ashley Leavitt of the Harvard Ave- 
nue Church of Brookline spoke in his ever 
forceful manner on "gifts," stressing the 
qualifications necessary for the true acceptance 
as well as for the right bestowal of a gift. 
During the service the Glee Club sang feel- 
ingly, groups of carols differing widely as to 
the different national interpretations of the 
spirit of the Christmastide. 



STUNT NIGHT 1922 

The entrance into the dining-rooms at Main 
and Woodland at our six o'clock dinner De- 
cember 15th, ushered in Slam night at Lasell 
as a veritable farewell Christmas festivity be- 
fore parting for our various homes. 

Around the cleared space in the centre of 
the dining halls were arranged the tables, each 
decorated by its own girls. Surely the pre- 
vious planning, bustling, and hustling to the 
Vil, Walt-bam, and Wellesley for decorations 
and presentation gifts had reaped its due re- 
ward voiced in the Ohs ! and Ahs ! of appre- 
ciation as we entered the rooms. 

In the centre of the tables were glistening 
Christmas trees, huge snow-balls, Jack Horner 
pies, and Santa Claus chimneys, with the 
decorative poinsettia, scarlet holly, and silver 
mistletoe everywhere in evidence. 

To the music of popping bonbons, whistles, 
bells, music boxes, and other conceivable and 
inconceivable instruments of noise the dinner 
progressed merrily to the stunt stage. Here 
no one was allowed to be forgotten from Mr. 
Towne "who couldn't have his cake and eat it" 
to her "who would a kewpie be" to him "whom 
on classification day, you never could see" ; to 
the girls "who at breakfast always are late" 
and to "those of whom we had secretly learned 
their fate." 

Of course all the stars promptly responded 
when called to appear in the centre of the 
room whether for fancy dancing, turning of 
cart wheels, solo singing, speech making or 
the usual procession of "roommates who fight," 
"engaged girls" and oh well — "We want so- 
and-so to do so-and-so" and she did ! 

( And the faculty stunt ! ) 

"Who says that the faculty 
It isn't just fine? 
It's just fine, all the time, 
All the time, all the time." 
And so "seeing oursel's as ithers see us" we 

left the dining-rooms to hasten to the gym- 
nasium for a lecture by Carveth Wells, 
F.R.G.S., on Malay Jungles. From Woodland 
we walked to Main in a glorious snow storm 
which gave us a lasting impression of Lasell 
in one of her supreme moments of beauty. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mr. Wells continued the merriment of the 
evening in his "uproariously instructive" talk 
on jungle life. Surely truth is stranger than 
fiction, when based on scientific Jungle fact. 
Mr. Well's pictures abounded in interest, de- 
picting marvelous incidents of jungle life and 
the wondrous beauties of tropic scenery. 

After "good nights" and "good-byes" for 
those of us leaving on early morning trains, 
we wandered in groups and knots back to our 
rooms, to put the last articles into our travel- 
ling bags, look for the hundredth time to see 
if railroad ticket and trunk key were safe — ■ 
then "Lights Out" bell and "Pleasant Dreams" 
of Stunt Night of 1922. 

Lasell, true to the tradition of former years, 
celebrated Christmas in the good old-fashioned 
way. The "girls" deserted us this year but 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow made happy the hearts 
of some forty or more children and grown- 
ups. 

Following the fine Christmas dinner a de- 
lightful hour was spent in the gymnasium, 
where gifts were exchanged and an impromptu 
program was furnished by the little folk. This 
year witnessed a new departure in the ar- 
rangement, for the trees, big and small, were 
placed either side of the great chimney, in just 
the most convenient place possible for fire- 
proof Santa Claus. One of the surprises on 
the program was a trio by the Winslow chil- 
dren with Marjorie at the piano, while Donald 
played the violin and wee Priscilla sang. 

We all, big and little, appreciate increasingly, 
the generous thoughtfulness on the part of our 
Principal and Mrs. Winslow who never fail to 
provide this generous celebration for those of 
us who are fortunate enough to remain at 
Lasell during the Christmastide. 



with the Radcliff freshmen, the score ending 
in a tie 2-2. 

We are now getting our material for our 
basket ball team and from all evidence it should 
be a mighty peppy one. 

Girls, will each one of you help to make it 
stronger by giving us your sincere support? 
Give us the benefit of your presence and of 
your heartiest cheers ! It goes further than 
you realize in strengthening the team, — your 
team ! 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Our hockey team has just finished a most 
successful season, playing five games. We 
played Newton High, Jackson, and Arlington 
on our own field, losing by a score of 3-2 to 
Newton, and 4-2 to Arlington. The score of 
the Jackson game was 7-0 in our favor. At 
Cambridge we played a very exciting game 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

Oct. 14th — All the Junior High girls heard 
Sir Harry Lauder at the Opera House in Bos- 
ton. 

We have swimming at the Lasell pool every 
Saturday morning. Nearly every one in Wood- 
land Park can swim! Some are hoping to 
compete for the Red Cross Life Saving tests 
this year. 

Oct. 18th— Mrs. MacDonald with Mr. and 
Mrs. Towne and Miss Arey attended the mar- 
riage of Charlotte Parker (Lasell '20) in 
Maiden. 

Oct. 22d — Miss Sawyer, Librarian, at Per- 
kins Institution for the Blind, spent a few 
hours at Woodland Park. 

We were happy to welcome Mrs. Davis of 
Elmira, New York, at the tea hour, Oct. 22d. 
Mrs. Davis was visiting her daughter, Miss 
Naomi Davis, a member of our music staff. 

Oct. 24th— Mrs. G. M. Winslow honored the 
Junior School by being our dinner guest. Mrs. 
Winslow met all the members of the school 
in the living room after dinner. 

Oct. 28th — Our Annual Hallowe'en party at 
Little Tree Farm. Once more Mr. and Mrs. 
Borst opened to us their hospitable doors. 
Over forty of us went to Framingham in 
Snow's Motorbus — crowded somewhat but 
very happy. The great blazing open fires in- 
vited us to have supper promptly, a real Hal- 
lowe'en supper. Armed with long sticks each 
one roasted her own frankfurt and bacon. 
We were so hungry ! After supper a romp in 
the hay and through the big barn, a little 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



dancing, the singing of our songs to Mr. and 
Mrs. Borst, and the long jolly ride home in the 
moonlight. 

"Thank you, Mr. and Mrs. Borst, for this 
delightful day !" 

Oct. 31st — Woodland Park was visited by 
half a hundred masked, white-robed figures 
who loudly demanded and carried away Mrs. 
McDonald. But they were kindly spirits and 
returned her safely a few hours later. Mrs. 
Briggs, a former Lasell Girl, was the leader of 
the ghostly group. 

Nov. 3d — Miss Tuttle, a former teacher at 
Lasell, visited and had lunch with us. All 
Lasell friends are welcome at Woodland Park. 

Nov. 4th — Gwendolyn McDonald spent the 
week end in Hudson, the guest of Miss Flor- 
ence Williams. 

Vera Hambleton entertained a party of her 
class-mates over the week-end at her home in 
Lawrence. 

Nov. 5th — We welcomed Mrs. Lambert and 
Norma Lambert. Mrs. Lambert has charge of 
Grades 4, 5, and 6, and Norma makes our 24th 
resident pupil. 

Nov. 12th — Who is not thrilled with a 
"haunted house" ? We walked down the river 
side and had a splendid exploring expedition. 
No ghosts discovered ! 

Marjorie Bancroft and Priscilla Winslow 
have been welcome house guests for a few 
days. 

Nov. 17th — Miss Cougetta Vanacore of 
Manchester, New Hampshire, was a guest 
over the week-end. 

Nov. 19th — Mr. Himelhoch of Detroit, spent 
Sunday with us, the guest of his daughter 
Mar jean. 

Accompanied by Mrs. Lambert, the Wood- 
land Park girls took the Old Boston trip on 
Saturday afternoon, November 25th. The 
climb up Bunker Hill Monument proved our 
girls physically fit. 

The Junior School enjoyed getting a 
Thanksgiving box off to Miss Ross. 

Quite a group of girls remained for the 
Thanksgiving recess. We had a theatre party, 



some hikes, candy-making and a general good 
time. , Thanksgiving dinner was eaten at 
Bragdon. After informal tea in Mrs. Towne's 
living-room, all adjourned to the Junior School 
living-room for a jolly party. 

The first pianoforte recital was held in the 
lobby and drawing-rooms of Woodland Park 
Hall on Friday afternoon, December 8th. Miss 
Bunting introduced the numbers and Miss 
Davis conducted the chorus. The following 
program was given before an appreciative 
audience of parents and friends. 

1. Criss Cross Hannah Smith 

Earl Cummings 

2. Minuet Mozart 

Mar jean Himelhoch 

3. Happy Days 

Dorris Elliott 

4. Apple Blossoms Manna Zuca 

Doris Jones 

5. Butterfly Chase Hannah Smith 

Priscilla Winslow 

6. Autumn Splendor George B. Nevin 

Chorus 

7. Cradle Song (Violin) Oscar Collier 

Gwendolyn McDonald 

8. The Coquette Jessie L. Gaynor 

Norma Lambert 

9. Cradle Song Charles Denee 

Mona Towle 

10. Twilight Rudolf Frince 

Gertrude Curtis 

11. Wanderer's Night Song Rubenstein 

Chorus 

12. Told at Twilight (violin) Charles Hueiler 

Dorothy Smith 

13. Barchetta Nevin 

Marguerite Gillespie 

14. Grillen Schumann 

Helen Parker 

15. Waltz Chopin 

Marjorie Winslow 

16. (a) Gavotte Gounod 
(b) To a Water Lily MacDowell 

Gwendolyn McDonald 

17. (a) Waltz in C sharp Chopin 
(b) Romance Saint Saens 

Katherine Braithwaite 

18. Prelude in C sharp Minor Rachmanninoff 

Victoria Jackson 

19. America My Home 

Chorus 

On Saturday evening, December 9th, our 
school enjoyed the two plays given by the 
Dramatic Club at Bragdon Hall. 

We were very happy to welcome the larg- 
est audience the Junior School has ever had 
at the Christmas Vesper Service on Sunday 
afternoon, December 10th. The first and sec- 
ond year French Classes sang a group of 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



French carols. The address by Dr. Butters 
was in the form of an original Christmas 
story, written with a special view to reaching 
one girl. After the benediction the lights were 
lowered, and with only the light from the 
candles which had been carried during the 
processional hymn, the school sang softly 
"Holy Night." Woodland Park hopes for 
many more inspirational messages from Dr. 
Butters. 

Such fun at our Slam-dinner ! And we are 
all "just crazy" about Carveth Wells, F. R. 
G. S. 

Our Christmas party came on Friday after- 
noon, December 15th. The usual big glisten- 
ing tree, the pile of Christmas stockings and 
corn balls, Roger Furlong's gift of candy 
canes, and a real Christmas spirit, combined 
to give us a happy memory to take to our 
several homes. After the singing of Christ- 
mas carols by the chorus, the children of the 
1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades gave a little Christ- 
mas play based on the Cinderella story. This 
was followed by two short French plays. The 
program ended with a beautiful original adap- 
tation of "When the Chimes Rang," which 
carried the Christmas message that the 
Prince of Peace cares not for empty gifts of 
gold and silver, but for loving hearts, hands 
that are willing and feet that never will tire 
in His service. 

The original Christmas posters, designed 
by the eighth grade under Mrs. Palmateer's 
supervision in the Art Department, added 
much to the festive cheer of our school rooms ; 
as did the Santa Claus fire-place, planned and 
executed by the younger grades. Dolls were 
made by members of the third and fourth 
grades who presented them to the Children's 
Ward of the Newton Hospital. The dolls 
were carefully constructed of soft, bright wool 
that they might be easily held and enjoyed 
by the sick children of Dennison Ward. 

The art project in correlation with the 
younger grades Reading and Geography took 
the form of a Japanese village. So fascinat- 
ing did it prove that many admiring visitors 



tarried long before its gay pagodas, arched 
bridges and quaintly dressed figures. 

But, whatever the season, there is always 
something of interest and inspiration in the 
Art Room, from the work of the littlest fin- 
gers to the free hand sketching and decorative 
designing of the older girls. And, best of all, 
the work is under proper guidance "their 
own." 



A GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT 



We often wonder if the Lasell girls the 
wide world over realize how much we appre- 
ciate their unfailing Christmas greetings of 
goodwill. Even from far away China and 
South America come loving messages arriving 
just in season. Snapshots of dear little Lasell 
children and a kind personal word accom- 
panied many of these beautiful cards. The 
joy of looking them over and affectionately 
"thinking over" the dear senders furnishes a 
delightful aftermath to our Christmas day 
celebration. 

With sincere appreciation, 

Dr. and Mrs. G. M. Winslow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Towne. 

Lillie R. Potter. 



TO LET 

I've wasted reams of paper 

And many hours of thought, 
Made wrinkles in my forehead 
As far and wide I've sought, 
And yet I've labored vainly 

Through all this work I've done, 
I've chased a million phantoms 
But never captured one. 

I've heard that there are many 

Who have ideas to spare. 
Is any one so lucky 

Just one he'd like to share? 
I'll furnish pen and paper 

For those things can be bought, 
I'd rather spend most anything, 

Than hours that come to naught. 

P. Osbom. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



LASELL CLUB MEETINGS 



During the latter half of October, it was 
my privilege to attend six meetings of Lasell 
Clubs. They came as follows : Chicago Club, 
October 17; Minnesota Club, October 19; 
Omaha and Council Bluffs Club, October 21 ; 
Indianapolis Club, October 23 ; Cleveland Club, 
October 26 ; and the Connecticut Valley Club, 
October 28. 

So much was done for me in the way of 
entertainment, auto transportation, personal 
conducting, and assistance that in this brief 
account I can barely mention a few of those 
to whom I am indebted. In Chicago I was 
for two days the fortunate guest of the Joneses 
of Evanston who entertained and helped me 
most generously in every possible way. In St. 
Paul, Elizabeth House McMillan and Kath- 
erine Wheeler showed me the capital city and 
surroundings. Mary Potter McConn and her 
husband gave me a long drive about Minne- 
apolis during which we called at their home, 
met their three attractive daughters, and called 
at the apartment of Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Pot- 
ter — the father and mother of Mrs. McConn 
and the brother and sister of our Miss Potter. 
We were then taken by Mrs. Potter to the 
Minneapolis Athletic Club for dinner much 
regretting the enforced absence of Mr. Potter 
who was adjusting railroad problems in North 
Dakota. In Omaha Mr. Adams, the husband 
of Martha Stone Adams, called at the hotel 
with the intention of showing me the city but 
we unfortunately missed connections. Before 
the meeting, however, I greatly enjoyed a chat 
with Mr. Adams and also with Mr. Pinney, 
the husband of Madge Hollenbeck Pinney. 
The pleasure of my stay in Indianapolis was 
greatly enhanced by the generous hospitality 
of the Lesh family. Charlotte helped plan 
my program, acted as guide and chauffeur and 
also managed the meeting of the Indianapolis 
Club, all of which was done thoroughly and 
efficiently. In Cleveland it was Miss Dolley 
whose hospitality and help, in ways too num- 
erous to mention, made my visit much more 



valuable than it otherwise could have been and 
whose interest and work contributed much to 
the success of the meeting. 

Time allowed only a small and tantalizing 
amount of visiting with friends along the way, 
but the few opportunities of meeting parents 
of girls now in school and of calling on Lasell 
girls in homes of their own with chances to 
see their most interesting children were greatly 
appreciated. 

The meeting of the Chicago Club was held 
at the Chicago Athletic Club. There were 
thirty-seven members present. The meeting 
was presided over by Mrs. Byram, the Presi- 
dent, at whose left sat Gertrude Buettner '17, 
the Secretary, whose twin sisters are members 
of the Class of '23. As usual it was difficult 
to find time to do justice to the menu because 
of the absorbing interest of the conversation. 

The following is the list of those present : 

Lydia Tukey Byram (1891-3) 

Lestra Hibbard Saxton '96 

Gertrude Buettner '17 

Pauline Fera '17 

Lena Hauck (1917-18) 

Harriet Fera '17 

Helen Guertin (1916-17) 

Alvine Hoelscher '22 

Elizabeth Thielens Miller (1904-5) 

Hazel Carey Adam '05 

Julia Potter Schmidt '06 

Margherita Dike Hallberg TO 

Ruth Farmer David ( 1908-10) 

Margaret M. Jones '11 

Florence K. Jones T2 

Alma L. Bunch '13 

Dora E. Goodwillie '14 

Edna Nichols Crosby (1912-13) 

Louise Funkhouser Williams '09 

Mona Ryan Inman ( 1906-07) 

Frieda Mayer Collins '11 

Louise Grunewakl ( 1903-04) 

Mary Lumbard Doonan TO 

Margaret Gregson Barker (1909-13) 

Ina Martha Harber '06 

Mary Florine Thielens Peeples (1904-5) 

Henriette W. McCulloch (1915-16) 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 




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Barbara Jones Bates '14 

Ida Ruth Jones '15 

Nell Jones Yeomans '05 

Alice Mott Stewart (1901-02) 

Julia Funkhouser Mellin (1906-07) 

Gertrude Gleason Shepard (1891-2) 

Edna Burdick Frost (1890-2) 

Lucy Wilson Errett '06 

Bertha Hax Auld (1879-81) 

The Minnesota Club met in a small dining- 
room of the St. Paul Athletic Club. It was 
an informal and very delightful meeting and 
the usual interest and loyalty of Lasell girls 
were evident. The following were present : 

May Emery Yale '98 

Mildred Melgaard '22 

Marguerite Owen (1913-14) 

Mary Potter McConn '05 

Bertha Lillibridge Merrill (1891-4) 

Pauline Orcutt Hemenway (1907-9) 

Katherine H. Wheeler '09 

Susan Stryker '10 

Marion Joslin Oppenheimer '12 

Bess House McMillan (1905-6) 



The meeting of the Omaha and Council 
Bluffs Club was held at the Hotel Fontenelle, 
Omaha. This club has been especially active 
during recent years, meeting frequently at the 
home of some member to work for some chari- 
table purpose. One of the Woodland Park 
students was the recipient of some of their 
product. At their meeting they voted to con- 
tribute one hundred dollars which they had in 
their treasury toward the Lasell Endowment 
Fund. Those present were : 

Dorothy Chaffee Stroud (1908-9) 

Ruth Boehner McCord '16 

Katherine Mulholland Gibbs (1918-19) 

Helen Wallace Brown (1902-3) 

Martha Dale Loomis (1906-7) 

Elinor Ryan Hixenbaugh '12 

Frances Bowman Gerner (1894-6) 

Martha Stone Adams (1891-3) 

Jean Field '22 

Louise Peycke Smith (1900) 

Helen Howes Haller '02 

Zoe Hill Mayne '01 

Eva Kennard Wallace (1897-8) 



LASELL LEAVES 



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Madge Hollenbeck Pinney (1900-1) 
Ellen Siedentopf Hass (1894-6) 
Mabel Taylor Gannett '95 
Laura Dale (1903-4) 

The Indianapolis meeting was in charge of 
Charlotte Lesh to whom the planning of the 
next meeting was left. Here, as at most of 
the meetings, there was a happy combination 
of representatives of Dr. Bragdon's time, with 
others of nearly all the periods following, 
linking the past with the immediate present. 
This club will soon be reinforced by recruits 
from students now in the school. 

There were at the table, the following: 

Charlotte Lesh '12 

Mildred Otto Roberts (1910-11) 

Helen Coons '21 

Thelma Blossom '21 

Flora McD. Ketcham (1896-7) 

Gertrude Taggart '97 

Mary Hope Lesh '21 

Helen Spring '21 

Mary Masters Newcomb '07 



Ella L. Hammond (1910-11) 
Edith Pearson Smith (1900-1) 
Ethelyn Prentice Knight '99 

A new Lasell Club was organized at the 
Cleveland Luncheon. Mrs. Ella Ampt Ham- 
ann '96, chairman of the organization com- 
mittee and later elected President, conducted 
the meeting in a most business-like way. 
Copies of a provisional constitution which had 
been carefully compiled and modified to suit 
the needs of the club were submitted article 
by article, amended, and adopted. Officers 
were elected, a telegram of greetings to Dr. 
Bragdon voted, and each person present called 
upon in turn to stand, give her name (or 
names) years at Lasell, and number of chil- 
dren or other items of interest. The popular 
number of children seemed to be three. 

The presence of two former Lasell teachers, 
Misses Rand and Dolley, was a pleasant fea- 
ture of the occasion. The first meeting of this 
new club augurs well for its future success. 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



Around the table were the following : 

Frances Bragdon West '05 

Margaret Rand (Teacher 1903-1919) 

Ada F. Patterson '15 

Clara Irene DeWolf Whited (1909-10) 

Beth Brandow Trumbull '11 

Florence Miller Henn (1904-5) 

Louise Horton Brockway (1894-5) 

Kathryn Chase Heine '16 

Helen Rollins Fisher '14 

Lois B. Tenny (1919-20) 

Helen Hart Lind '18 

Jeannette E. Geist '21 

Ada M. Prasse (1921-22) 

Myrtle Mahler Strauss (1900-02) 

Gertrude Schloss Fleishman (1903-4) 

Florence Stafford Andrews (1915-16) 

Elizabeth Bailey (1909-10) 

Frances King Dolley (Teacher 1907-17) 

Bertine Libby '13 

Agnes L. Wylie West '05 

Ella Ampt Hamann '96 

On October 28th the Connecticut Valley 
Club met at the Hartford Club under the ex- 
perienced management of the President, Susan 
Hallock Couch. Mrs. Couch is Treasurer of 
the Connecticut League of AVomen Voters and 
is one of the small but gradually increasing 
number of Lasell women who are taking an 
active part in political affairs. 

One very interesting feature of the Connec- 
ticut Valley Club was the disclosure of the 
fact that several members, among them Mrs. 
Sarah Dyer Darling, have practically a perfect 
record of attendance at the meetings of the 
club since its organization sixteen or seven- 
teen years ago. 

In view of the fact that on the same after- 
noon there were very interesting football 
games as rival attractions, the number present 
was very gratifying: 

Elsie C. Fengar (1905-7) 

Sue I. Gallup (1903-4) 

Eva C. Robertson (1903-4) 

Bessie Brainard Schmadeke (1896-7) 

Elsie Reynolds '00 

Lelia Walker Saunders '01 



Sarah Dyer Darling (1900-01) 

Fanny L. MacKenzie (1903-4) 

Mabel Case Viot '94 

Emma White Welles (1890-3) 

J. Adelaide Plumstead '85 

Jessie W. Hayden (1882-5) 

Susan H. Couch (1886-8) 

Marion Austin (1920-22) 

Josephine Holbrook '22 

Dorothy Moore '22 

Cornelia M. Hemingway '22 

Helen Cooke Waters (1892-4) 

Lucy Miller Robotham (1903-4) 

Nellie M. Hart ( 1902-4) 

Elsie L. Bolles '04 

Ruth Miller Wolfe (1908-9) 

Jennie Johnson Brewster (1905-6) 

Gertrude P. Reynolds (1888-90) 

Ruth K. Merriam '98 

Mabel Deming (1902-4) 

Laura R. Comstock (1891-2) 

Helen M. Saunders '17 

Laura Hale Gorton '16 

Marion Griffin Wolcott '16 

Maebelle Hamlin Barby (1915) 

Lillian G. Grant '20 

Madge L. Shepard ( 1916-18) 

Clara McLean Rowley '02 

Grace Holmes Stiles (1892-3) 

Bertha Hayden King '03 

Mary E. Goodwin Olmsted '03 

Helen Merriam Cornell (1902-3) 

Bessie L. Comstock (1891-3) 

At all of these Lasell reunions, I was given 
an opportunity to tell of recent events at the 
Seminary, and of our plans for the future. 

In the main my theme was as follows — 
with the addition of some later items : 

"Lasell is now somewhat over seventy years 
old. It was organized as a trustee-owned in- 
stitution, and then, following the Civil War, 
came upon difficult times, which eventually 
resulted in the necessity of some effective 
measure of relief. At that time Dr. Bragdon 
came to the rescue and there followed forty 
years of growth and of successful development 
of the institution as a private school. Under 



LASELL LEAVES 19 

this form of organization, the continued life grateful to those who took bonds, and also to 

and success of the institution was very largely the many others who, though not at the time 

dependent upon one or two individuals, and prepared to take bonds helped much by words 

there was no opportunity to enlist the co- of encouragement and approval, 

operation of the alumnae and friends of the With our immediate necessities reasonably 

school for the purpose of making it a perma- provided for, we may now turn our attention 

nent institution by the building up of an ade- to the larger task which when accomplished, 

quate endowment fund. Also a heavy finan- will to a high degree make the permanence of 

cial burden had been assumed by the addition the Seminary assured ; — namely, the establish- 

of the large Woodland Park property in 1917. ment of an adequate endowment fund. 

Although this valuable estate was acquired on During the past twenty years a substantial 

extraordinarily favorable terms, the oppor- start toward an endowment has been made, 

tunity came during difficult war times, with We have the following funds : — 

increased costs and decreased number of stu- The Jeremiah Clark Fund $1,000 

dents. The Bird Scholarship Fund 5,000 

To meet the general need for assured per- Given by will of Charlotte A. K. 

manency and the immediate need of financial Bancroft of the class of 1857. 

backing, a new organization was formed in The Angeline C. Blaisdell Fund 8,800 

May, 1921, and Lasell returned to trustee Given by will of Miss Blaisdell, 

ownership. Class of 1867, and for years 

The alumnae and former students are well teacher and treasurer, 

represented both in the Corporation and on Class Funds coming either as 

the Board of Trustees, and it is expected that g ifts from the Class or from mdi " 

their participation will increase with the years. vidual members and assigned to 

There will be in the new Alumnae Register their classes. 

now being printed the names of 1227 gradu- 1861 100 

ates of whom 1070 are living, — and there are 1894 7 

several thousand non-graduate former Lasell 1897 70 

students among whom are many whose loyalty 1908 100 

to the school is equal to that of the graduates, 1910 50 

as repeatedly has been shown. 1911 25 

To these and to other friends we last year 1912 50 

appealed for a little assistance in the way of 1921 originally $250, now 333 

the purchase of our General Mortgage Bonds. 1922 originally $2,000, now 2,000 

As a result somewhat over fifty-four thousand Fund of Omaha and Council Bluffs 

dollars' worth were sold. That sale, with the Club 100 

moderate margin saved from last year's in- G. M. Winslow Fund 3,030 

come has so improved the condition of the " 

Seminary that it seems at present unnecessary Total $20,665 

to sell more bonds. In addition to the above there are two funds 

While the purchase of these bonds was not in the hands of the Alumnae Association, from 

at all in the nature of a contribution, but only the income of which students receive aid. 

the making of a good investment, the change These are the Caroline Carpenter Fund of 

in the form of the indebtedness of the Semi- about $1,800 managed by Mrs. Merriam, and 

nary brought great relief by giving us the time the balance of somewhat over $3,000 which 

necessary to meet our obligations without Mrs. Cushing, the efficient Treasurer of the 

serious sacrifices. We are, therefore, very Alumnae Association, has accumulated from 



20 LASELL LEAVES 

the annual dues and life memberships paid by It is our purpose merely to present to the 

members of the Association. Lasell family and friends an opportunity to 

This gives a grand total of over $25,000— a have a part in what we thoroughly believe to 

very respectable beginning of our endowment, be a large and worth-while enterprise. 

With the hope of starting in a way which There are few ways in which money can be 

will enable a large number to take part, and given with more certainty of benefit to the 

which will bring in a constantly increasing recipient than by judicious help to a young 

amount, we are now sending out to our gradu- Person who desires to obtain an education 

ates former students and friends, an invitation Cell's seventy years of service, the ideals and 

to pledge five dollars as an annual contribution traditions which are so large a part of the 

to the Lasell Endowment Fund. The gift may institution, even more than the splendid loca- 

be designated as an addition to the General tion and the large organization and plant make 

Endowment Fund, to a Class Fund, to a Club the school the natural avenue through which 

Fund or to any special fund. Mrs. Winslow her £riends ma 7 make a return m kmd for ben " 

and I are planning to indulge in the pleasure efits received. For those of us who believe 

of trying to build up a creditable fund of our in what Lase11 has done > and 1S dom g> and who 

own, not at all with a desire to be exclusive, desir e that the work may go on, and grow, it 

but in order, if possible, to accomplish a certain is a §" r eat privilege to help make the school se- 

specific purpose. cure a §' a i nst tne winds which will blow, and 

„, , , , , u strong to serve well the students of the days 

The pledge reads as tollows: — ° TI7 . 

T , , , , . , „ , „ , to come. Critv M. winslow. 

I hereby pledge for the Endowment .bund ~_ 

of Lasell Seminary $5.00 per year to be TWO NEW LASELL CLUBS 

( General Endowment Fund 

credited to the -1 Fund of the Class of The following is copied from a Bangor 

I Fund of the Club paper of last August: 

It is understood that this is an annual sub- LASELL ALUMNAE GUESTS OF THEIR 

, . , ,, r~ r t n PRESIDENT 

scnption payable to the Treasurer of Lasell Dr . winslow Is Host at Tarratine Club Luncheon 

Seminary on April 1st of each year until re- at Which Local Alumnae Ass'n Is Formed 

vnkpH in writincr Dn and Mrs - Guy M " Wins,ow of Lase11 Semin- 

voked in writing. ary> Auburndale, Mass., entertained the resident 

Name alumnae of that famous institution for young ladies 

Address at a luncheon at the Tarratine Club, Wednesday 
noon. The luncheon was arranged by Dr. Winslow, 

who is principal, for the promoting of an alumme 

£) a f- e association here, where none has previously existed. 

After the luncheon, such an association was formed 

While there is no wish to curb the enthu- with Miss Charlotte Ryder as president, Miss Ethel 

r , , • . Hook of Brewer as treasurer and Miss Berenice 

siasm of any who may desire to give more, it Cole of Brewer as secretary. Others present were 

is the particular purpose of this effort to en- the following graduates of Lasell: Mrs. Leslie W. 

i- t. i i ., , . ,, , Cutter, Mrs. Haven Sawyer, Mrs. William Hilton, 

list as large a number as possible m the under- Miss Charlotte Ryder, Miss Elaine Bass, Miss Edrie 

taking. So we make the amount small and Mahaney, Miss Theresa Thompson, Miss Faustina 

uniform, thoroughly democratic, as befits the J£fth2h Dun„t g , M^feaua "n5S?rf &*& 

Lasell spirit. Mrs. C. M. Thorndike of Millinocket, Miss Julia 

~, .,, , (( , . „ , Crafts of Greenville, Miss Mary Louise Weymouth of 

I here will be no drive, no set sum to be Dexter, Miss Ethel Hook and Miss Berenice Cole of 

obtained, and no specific date for a hectic fin- g rewer - The organization is to be known as the 

• i t> ,- • u u. 4.1. 1 r 11 • f-astern Maine Lasell club. Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 

lSh. Realizing how often those who fully m- left on the early afternoon train for Fort Fairfield, 

tend to write a letter or send in a subscription where & « planned, a similar club for Aroostook 

, .. 1 r i • f ' county will be formed. 

fail merely from the crowding of events or At the Fort Fairfield luncheon, there were 

from a lapse of memory, we shall send a few twelve graduates and former students present 

reminders to those who are not heard from. Lasell songs, between courses, and Lasell blue 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



decorations gave the real school setting for 
recalling old times. The unique place cards, po- 
tatoes flying Lasell flags, cleverly symbolized 
the union of Aroostook County girls with 
Lasell. The Aroostook County Club was 





formed with Miss Alice Kimball '98 as Presi- 
dent, and Maxine Perry '22, Secretary and 
Treasurer. The new president immediately 
started activities by inviting the members to a 
picnic on her big farm. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow reported a most en- 
joyable four-day trip from their farm in 
Turner, Maine, to Bangor, and on to Fort 
Fairfield to meet these loyal Lasell girls, and 
to help in the formation of the new clubs. 
They were royally entertained, and shown the 
beauties of Bangor and the wonderful Aroos- 
took country. They had the pleasure of see- 
ing Charlotte Ryder and Berenice Cole in their 
homes, and of calling upon Lydia Adams at 
her seaside cottage. 

Lasell girls make ideal hostesses, and their 
enthusiasm and love for their old school seem 
unbounded. We predict great success for their 
newly formed clubs. In the near future, it is 
hoped that there will be a Lasell Club at 
Portland. 



Lasellites of many years are asked to take 
notice of Dr. Bragdon's changed address. His 
new home is at 615 Prospect Blvd., Pasadena, 
California. He did not ask us to say so, but 
we can safely venture to assure all of his 
"old girls" that the same cordial welcome 
awaits them at the new home. 

In a recent letter to the Seminary, Dr. 
Bragdon speaks again, in grateful terms, of 
the courtesies extended to him at the time 
of his birthday. He writes : "I had a good 
time reading the undeserved, but pleasant, 
words which came to me at that time. Once 
I wrote a line of appreciation to Robert Bur- 
dett and he replied : T have 232 bones in my 
body and every bone in my body loves to be 
praised.' It all sounded so sincere I found 
it hard to believe it was meant for me. We 
are all together again, Belle and Margaret are 
here. Miss Roth sent me this interesting no- 
tice about our old pupil Annie Alexander. 
Harriet M. Dreyfus was here visiting her 
family in Los Angeles and waited two weeks 
to see me. Wasn't that friendly of her? As 
a lawyer in Washington she is making good. 
Fraulein Roth is at San Jose and doing well." 

Priscilla Alden Wolfe '19 is certainly one 
of our most efficient graduates. She not only 
takes good care of her dear little boys and 
husband but seems to find leisure to keep up 
with her old Lasell associates. In the latest 
word from her she was preparing to take part 
in Louise Furbish's '20 wedding procession. 
So bright and breezy is her letter, we must 
quote a word from it. "This morning, while 
rushing around in Boston looking for a pair 
of 'golden slippers,' I ran into Miss Tuttle. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



She was looking fine. I hear through my lit- 
tle sister-in-law that everything is going well 
at Lasell. Roxy Stark Burns '18 and Ruth 
Young and Dottie Packard Klopp keep in 
touch with me and I hear all about their little 
families. Roxy says she doesn't quite see 
what I do with two boys. One nearly 
'finishes her' but Dottie and I seem to be 
keeping our heads above water and we each 
have two impish boys ! Edith Vance Nicol- 
son '19 writes that she has a lovely little daugh- 
ter, and she enjoys taking care of her." By 
the way, Priscilla tells us that Ruth Smith '21 
played the wedding march for Louise. 
Georgina Flattery Whitelegg and her hus- 
band are settled at West Point. Since re- 
ceiving this word from Priscilla we have had 
a card from Georgina announcing the birth of 
a little son. Her husband is on the faculty 
of the West Point Military Academy. Vir- 
ginia Quarles '19 and her husband are travel- 
ling quite a bit in the United States. Mercie 
Nichols '19 is teaching drawing down on Cape 
Cod. Mercie was in Vermont this summer 
and saw Ethel Ramage Fiske '19. Priscilla 
keeps in constant touch with Helen Webster 
'19, and both are planning to visit Lasell in 
the near future. 

Barbara Jones Bates '14 always writes a 
delightful letter. Especially fine was the 
sketch she gave of that dear, big, little son 
"of hers" who, by the way, insists upon calling 
his devoted mother, "Bobbie," but, in as much 
as he has only reached the advanced age of a 
little over a year, we can easily overlook this 
dear liberty on his part. Barbara had a happy 
summer, having motored to her old home 
in Paris, 111., and speaks of entertaining 
Florence '12 and Margaret '11 Jones at her 
home. She writes : "Little Frederick was 
sweet as sugar, but into everything — I thought 
he was in the sun parlor, and turned around 
in the kitchen for something, and there he 
stood, quiet as a mouse, just bathing his little 
hands in the Thousand Island Dressing." She 
closes with greetings to all and special love to 
Mile. LeRoyer. 



Among the recent callers at Lasell, whom 
some of us did not have the pleasure of seeing, 
was dear Hazel Palmer '16. However, we did 
have the pleasure of welcoming home Freda 
Griffin '20, Ruth Rawlings '21, and Vivian 
Sadler. 

Helen Jacobs did what she hoped to do. Is 
now taking a special course in the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital along the line of her 
chosen profession, Dietetics. Mildred Strain 
Nutter '17 and her guest dear Helen Saunders 
'17 made a flying trip to Lasell during Helen's 
week stay at Mildred's home. Both girls 
looked well, but did not give us half time 
enough to ask for a report of their busy, happy 
lives. 

Frances Angel '22 dined with us recently, 
and, to our great surprise and delight, tells 
us that she is regularly enrolled as a law 
student in Boston University. 

Mabel Straker Kimball '16 was recently 
Miss Woodward's '15 week-end guest. We 
must take her word for it that she has the 
care of two lively children, but they certainly 
do not "wear on her," for she was looking as 
young as of yore. 

Elizabeth Groves made altogether too 
formal a call to satisfy us. We were delighted 
to meet her wee sister and the friend who ac- 
companied her. 

Mrs. Miriam Loomis and her sister were 
recently the guests of Dr. and Mrs. Winslow. 
She is, as usual, very active in philanthropic 
work. Lasell is even now enjoying the splen- 
did impetus which she gave us along the lines 
of Household Economics. 

How enthusiastically the girls welcomed 
home Miss Tuttle during the recent visit of 
our beloved former instructor. Miss Tuttle 
looked in on us on her way to Florida. We 
wish for her a happy winter in the Southland. 

Word has recently come through the Peoria 
Transcript that Phyllis Maple '22 has been 
pledged to Delta Gamma sorority at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and that John Roth, Jr., 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John Roth (Josephine 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Milliken) has been pledged to Chi Psi Fra- 
ternity at Bowdoin College, in Brunswick, Me. 

Tradition to the contrary notwithstanding, 
there seems really to be no definite month for 
marriages, for all year long our dear Lasell 
girls keep the joyous wedding bells a'ringing! 
The twenty-second of November was the 
wedding day of Dorothy Edwards '21 when 
she became the bride of Mr. Emery Doran 
Austin. 

Hallie Dickey '16 and Mr. William Brewer 
Cooley were united in marriage on the twenty- 
second of November. After the tenth of De- 
cember Mr. and Mrs. Cooley will be at home 
at William Penn Apartments, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

The wedding day of Elsie Mayer and Mr. 
Joseph True Steuer was the twenty-fifth of 
November. 

Elinore Hawkins was married to Mr. 
Jacob C. Sheets on September 15th, at Ash- 
land, Ky. 

On the twenty-first of October, the wedding 
of Marion Harvey and Mr. Donald Shackley 
Higgins took place. Mr. and Mrs. Higgins 
will be at home after the first of December, at 
78 Royal Road, Bangor, Maine. 

The wedding of Mabelle F. Wells and Mr. 
Robert Richard Miller took place recently. 
Mr. and Mrs. Miller will be at home after the 
first of January, at 49 Benedict Terrace, Long- 
meadow, Mass. 

Irene Purinton and Mr. Harry Hitchinson 
Pierce, Jr., were united in marriage on the 
twenty-sixth of October. 

The engagement announcement of Olive H. 
Eastman to Mr. George Wills Apsey, Jr., is 
received. 

A fine letter from Mary Lulie Hogg '88 to 
our Principal was recently received. She 
writes from El Paso, Texas, with enthusias- 
tic approval of what she calls "the splendid 
idea of financing Lasell" (referring to our 
Lasell School Bonds). At present, Lulie is in 
El Paso with her nephew, Alexander, who is 
recuperating after his recent illness. She sends 
good news concerning her niece our Margaret 



Powell Hertig. Lulie "ran" recently on the 
Public School Board ticket, but declared she 
was defeated by the Ku Klux and adds, "I got 
a lot of fun out of the experience and learned 
some things I should know." We have a 
strong feeling had she been "up North" she 
would have gone into office with a handsome 
majority vote. 

Ethel St. Clair writes from Los Angeles 
asking for her credits. She has been a suc- 
cessful teacher for some time, but is now 
planning to do some graduate work at Teach- 
ers' College, Columbia University. If she gets 
as far East as New York, we hope she will 
be neighborly. 

An interesting article appeared recently in 
the California Alumni Monthly concerning 
the California Museum of Verterbrate Zo- 
ology. The writer states that the Museum was 
founded in 1908 at the instance of Miss Annie 
M. Alexander. Miss Alexander was one of 
our Lasell girls, and we are quite proud of 
her good work in the Department of Natural 
Science. The establishment of the Museum 
and its maintenance and steady growth have 
been made possible through the continued in- 
terest of Miss Alexander. Support from her, 
in the form of annual grants, was in 1919 sup- 
plemented by the gift of $200,000 for the per- 
manent endowment of the Museum, that its 
main lines of activity might be continued with- 
out possibility of hindrance. The Museum is 
at present housed in a two-story, galvanized- 
iron building at the northwest corner of Cali- 
fornia Field which was erected in 1908 with 
funds supplied jointly by Miss Alexander and 
the University. 

Just the latest word from Dr. Bragdon con- 
tains a charming picture of St. Gile's Church, 
Stoke Poges, "the country church yard" im- 
mortalized by the poet Gray. The photograph 
was sent him by Annie Burney Eaton. She 
writes, "Perhaps this will interest you. I won- 
der if you have ever been here. Fulmore 
Grange, my daughter's home, is nearby. With 
best wishes and remembrances to Mrs. Brag- 
don and yourself." In his note Dr. Bragdon 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



writes : "At last we are in our permanent 
home in Pasadena, and hope to see many 
Lasellians." 

We regret the illness of her daughter which 
brought Mrs. Anderson to Lasell. She re- 
mained through the Thanksgiving vacation 
while Elizabeth was recuperating. This gave 
us opportunity to get acquainted with this 
dear mother, and we have, without permission, 
made her an honorary Lasellian. 

The newest new girl at Lasell is Natalie 
Albury, Nassau, Bahamas. Already she has 
won an enviable place in the affections of our 
regular family. We love to watch the enthus- 
iasm of this southern girl over her first snow- 
storm. 

Dear Ana Clark '22 and her mother had 
just started for their home in Alajuela, Cen- 
tral America, when they received, by wireless, 
word of the accidental shooting of Ana's only 
brother, a student at a California college. In 
her unspeakably sad message Ana tells us that, 
as yet, they do not know any of the details. 
Our hearts are turning very tenderly and con- 
stantly to these bereaved friends to whom we 
send our most heartfelt sympathy. 

Her old classmates will remember that 
Frances Heath Thompson '20 devoted her- 
self to kindergarten work after leaving Lasell. 
In a note, just received from this graduate, 
she declares that all of her attention, at pres- 
ent, is directed to one little child, wee Virginia, 
her daughter. Of her she writes: "She is a 
dear, and seems to grow sweeter and more 
adorable each day." Frances adds further: 
"As I could not be with you last June, I am 
hoping I can come next commencement with 
Virginia. With four babies in our class, I am 
sure we can have a delightful reunion." Along 
with this note of Frances's came her annual 
subscription for the Leaves. 

Ruth Burnap Dresser T7 also sent her 
Leaves subscription, and adds "The Leaves 
keeps us so well posted on what the school 
and your girls are doing." She kindly invites 
our Preceptress to visit her and also her young 
son for "he is an adorable baby." 



A very friendly letter has been received 
from Lucile Pf eif er '22. She writes : "I am 
remaining home this Winter, and make my 
formal debut into society next Tuesday night. 
I do not wish you to believe that my one aim 
in life is having a good time, because I am 
trying to follow the teachings of Lasell and be 
a little useful. I teach Sunday School, and 
have in my class nineteen small 'ten-year olds' 
I am trying to direct in the way in which they 
should go. Also, am head of the 'Sunshine 
Club' — organized to bring sunshine and good 
cheer into the lives of those who are less 
fortunate." Lucile closes with the hope that 
she may see Lasell before the year is over, 
and also sends her best regards to Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow, Mr. and Mrs. Towne, Miss 
Ells and Miss Wright. 

Our Preceptress has received friendly greet- 
ings from Miss Rose Morgenthaler, who with 
her sister, Dr. Morgenthaler, had been the 
guest of Fraulein Heinrich. They are now 
in their Winter home at Daytona Beach, 
Florida. 

Professor Hills is "home again" at Lasell, 
and Lasell seems more like home because of 
his presence. His sabbatical year was spent in 
Washington, D. C. where he and Mrs. Hills 
were the guests of their son, who is a promi- 
nent lawyer in the National Capital. "Prof." 
Hills is no longer a day instructor, but a resi- 
dent teacher. As they would say in the South- 
land, "he seems now to belong." 

The Greenview (Illinois Review of Decem- 
ber 1st) contains a most touching and beauti- 
ful tribute to the late Rudolph B. Wern- 
sing, youngest son of our Anna Marbold 
Wernsing. The accidental death of this 
young man has saddened the entire community. 
Our tenderest sympathy is extended to the be- 
reaved mother and brothers. 

Our old girls are gradually taking a prom- 
inent place in the political world. Edith An- 
thony Car low '06 recently ran successfully for 
membership on the School Board. Mrs. Car- 
low has, for some time, been interested in 
civic affairs, and our congratulations are ex- 
tended to her because of her recent victory. 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



Marguerite Mason, here in 1920-21, has re- 
cently announced her engagement to Claude A. 
Brumbach of Reading, Pa. 

One of the graceful and enthusiastic events 
of the Christmas dinner was the Oh-e-la wel- 
come to the Class of 1922, who were repre- 
sented on that evening by Sarah Crane, Vir- 
ginia Emmott, Carolyn Badger, Marjorie Gif- 
ford, and Olive Whitehead. Other mem- 
bers of the class, who were with us for the 
Christmas Vespers, were Marion Brown, 
Helen Libby, and Phyllis Rafferty. 

The readers of the Leaves, especially the 
former members of the editorial staff, will 
wish to join with us in extending hearty con- 
gratulations to our able promoter of years 
ago, Mr. Jack Connolly, former President of 
the Washington Press Association and night 
editor of the Boston Herald. Mr. Connolly 
and Miss Lucile Marie Maule were married 
November 28th, at Rockville, Maryland. 

Marie Houghton Gilman '16 and her hus- 
band have returned to Auburndale, and we 
are delighted to learn that Marie is the mother 
of a dear little daughter, almost a Christmas 
baby. We have not yet learned the daughter's 
name, but, without permission from her par- 
ents, have placed her on the Lasell waiting 
list. 

We are tempted to repeat in part, dear 
Helene Grashorn's '22 holiday note, for it 
brings her so pleasantly and distinctly before 
us again. She writes : "As I was sitting at 
my piano this evening, and my fingers were 
just rambling from one piece to another, I 
happened to play "our" favorite hymn, and 
I just had to sit down and write you. I have 
thought of you and Lasell so often this year. 
I have played for services in church, once in 
a while, but it's not like sitting in the old 
chapel with you, Miss Potter, and selecting our 
Vesper hymns. I am studying organ at 
Northwestern University under Prof. Seder, 
and enjoy it very much. Last week I spent 
with Vera Clauer and also saw three other 
Lasell girls. Am getting all excited now 
because the girls get home Saturday and 
then I can hear about Lasell. Really, I never 



knew I ever could miss anybody as much as I 
have the girls and you this year, and I hope 
that I shall be fortunate enough to be back 
this Summer with you all." We join you in 
that wish, Helene. 

Along with her beautiful Christmas card, 
Florence Skinner Anderson writes : "I am 
very busy, but happy, with my husband and 
baby. Little Sylvia is growing every day and 
is a dear ! She laughs and talks to herself 
all the time, and we just love her to pieces ! 
I hope some day she can go to Lasell." 

Barbara Vail Bosworth '05 wrote a fine 
note to our Preceptress at Christmastide in 
which she says : "Christmas always makes me 
think of Lasell days. Those winter vacations 
were such fun." Barbara speaks of her plan 
for a happy Christmas time and, just like her, 
has included in her Christmas party a couple 
who are strangers in the town and whom she 
wished to make happy. Barbara and her hus- 
band spent one of these Yule-tide nights at 
their Summer home on the lake. They cer- 
tainly are apostles of nature for great was their 
enthusiasm over the country in winter array. 

Irene Ball Sill '15 sent with her beautiful 
Christmas card a loyal message, declaring that 
she thinks often of Lasell and wonders how 
everything is going on at the old school, adding, 
"Every fall I wish I were eighteen and going 
to have my two years at Lasell over again." 
She closes her note with a delightful an- 
nouncement in the form of a question: "Did 
you receive a note from me, telling you of my 
new Katherine? She is seven months old now, 
a tiny little doll, and a dear." 

Lasell students, for many years past, will 
be pained to learn of the sudden passing away 
of Mr. Silas Pierce, one of Lasell's former 
trustees, husband of our Annie Kendig Pierce 
'80, and father of Mildred Pierce Fuller '06 
and Elizabeth Pierce Bittenbender. The 
daily press of Boston, as well as the religious 
papers, have paid loving tribute to this gifted 
and consecrated citizen. A host of old Lasell 
girls will join with us in extending tenderest 
sympathy to these bereaved former school- 
mates. 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



An unusually happy Christmastide party at 
Mary Potter McConn's '05 this Yuletide. 
Julia Potter Schmidt '06, her husband and two 
dear children, Mr. and Mrs. Potter were also 
there, and the lively report which has just 
come from Mary Eugenia McConn, Mary's 
little daughter, declares "it was a most Christ- 
massy of Christmas celebrations." 

A minor note came into the immediate 
Lasell family, during the Christmas celebra- 
tions, for our dear Mrs. Towne spent that time 
in the Newton Hospital. However, we are 
happy to report her convalescent, and hope 
soon to have her "home again." 

Miss Grace F. Austin spent one week of the 
Christmas vacation with her brother, Mr. Ar- 
thur Austin at their old home in Orleans, 
Vermont. 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



mmsmmmmmmm 




5S- MADE BY ,-s:- 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

DORCHESTER.MASS. 



wm§mwke,'*\itoZSjmmBt 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




a X Brothers 

(tttyaxw SUaea, Itnlets *«* Wrttyxhs 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 



44 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON 



CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 


STUDENTS! 


FOR 


WHEN YOU 


REAL SERVICE 


THINK OF 
BUYING 




SCHOOL 


Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 


SUPPLIES 
THINK OF 


A fine line of high grade Stationery 


^$a&w7i^. 


and imported Perfumes 


^- — g^og"^-^^ of Boston ) 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 


BOULEVARD PHARMACY 


PEMBERTON [7] SQUARE 


2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 


Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store i 




L R fiollander go. 




Established 1848 


A FRIEND 






NEW ATTRACTIVE 




SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 




Childs, Sleeper & Co. 


appropriate for every Sport 


WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 


and Social activity of the 


BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 


Young Miss at School 


202-216 Boylston Street 


57 and 58 N. Market St. Boston 


Boston 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 

BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 
BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 1 3*2 South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



QUALITY 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



O. S. REED 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waltham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
Uttatr HbmlttB 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

That is always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Presh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH. 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



(jOwriie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 

Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 

1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 

Inc. 

FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 
364 Boylston Street Arimg^onstreet 

Established 1858 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



SMART 



[iSjFOoggffiYig^ 



■QO 



WALKING 



SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 
ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON. Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., 

Telephone Rich. 820 



Boston 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Recipes 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H Huot, Treas. E.J Monetise, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 








•—DUTCH- 

CHOCOLATE 



w, "<. M. FLANDERS:-- 

<8-49 (NDtA STRIET.' 
BOSTON DISTRIBUTE 



Invalids 



and 

convales- 
cents 
thrive on 
it 



The 



most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 





<S©]M5><gft 



THE ISLAND CAMP FOR GIRLS 

For Booklet address Mrs. Charles F. Towne 
Lasell Seminary, Auburndale 66, Mass. 




LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Ave. 161 Tremont St. 131 1 Walnut St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



SEASONABLE GIFTS 



SPECIAL 
$10.00 




LENGTH 

24 
INCHES 



INDESTRUCTIBLE PARISIAN PEARL NECKLACES 



BAR PIN 

$5.00 

I4K Gold Set with Genuine 
Sapphire 









tmcmtmiM% 



t i,-C' , --v,:v...>->, i <<^.j > t^grrt» 



BAR PIN 

$10.00 

18K White Gold with Yellow 

Gold Gallery. Set with Cut 

Diamond — a Bargain 



SWEATER SET 
$6.50 

Parisian Pearls set so that they 
will not get loose oi come off 



WRIST WATCH 
$50.00 

14K Gold Case— Full Jeweled 
Movement 




7 




Yfholesale^Ret 



SUMMER S% 

'JEWElERaJS. 




telillEflS 




Vol. XXXXVIII No. 3 



FEBRUARY, 1923 



m 



LASELL LEAVES 



l^ag it twtt!j MlnmtB 




(Efyarge arrountB Holtrit^ 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



Every Paris report says 

Felt Cloche Hats 

and we are prepared with a most 
attractive selection of these charm 
ing little Chapeaux in all popular 
Spring shades. They are espe- 
cially desirable for the college girl. 




Jordan Marsh Company 



Boston 



E. T. Slattery Co, 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



A specialty store that is 
ideally fitted to satisfy the 
apparel wants of the college 
girl. Everything here is 
authentic in style and de- 
pendable in service. 



E. T. Slattery Co 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




Oldest Rug House 
in America 



Linoleum Time Is Here 
This Is Linoleum Place 



EVERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
The same applies to offices and public places in general. 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 



an 



d F 



urs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



t %TBA OVALl-ry 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 

IS- 






Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



IksELL Leaves 

Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., FEBRUARY, 1923 No. 3 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 



Business Manager 
JOSEPHINE CURRY 



Joke Editor 
LOUISA C. VENABLE 



Assistant Joke Editor 
M. EVELYN SHIDLER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-Chief 
HELEN L. CHAPMAN 



Local Editors 

MARGARET BUNNELL 
MARY M. DeWOLF 



Subscription 


Manager 


ARLINE ALLSOPP 


Athletic 


Editor 


CAROLYN S 


. COLTON 


Literary 


Editor 


ELIZABETH 


BRISTOW 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 



FRONTISPIECE 



LITERARY 



The Old Leather Box Eva-May Mortimer 5 



My Home Town • 



Anna Hendee 7 



EDITORIAL 



LOCALS 



10 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 11 



PERSONALS 



JOKES 



12 



18 




THE GLEE CLUB 




THE MANDOLIN CLUB 



^£>^, 




ID 



CANDLES AND COFFEE FOR TWO 



The ancient house lay in the meadows white, 

The whole world glittered 'neath the pale moon's 

light. 
But from the low bay-window came a gleam 
Of candle light which cast its shadowy beam 
Across the meadow almost to the stream. 

Within a room a crackling fire up-threw 
A thousand flamelets — crimson, gold, and blue, 
Lighting still more this pleasant gathering place. 
To-night there were but two who were to grace 
The old oak table near the window case. 

And here a dainty cloth was neatly spread, 
While two red candles glowed there at the head, 
Casting a gleam of light that made a crown 
Upon the hostess' head of golden brown. 
And at her guest she smiled and then looked down. 

She asked if he would coffee have, or tea? 
Then he replied it would the former be. 
Long did they talk of childhood days ; how glad, 
And yet sometimes when one looks back, how sad 
To know they've gone, are but the things we've had. 

The stern old clock that ticked the hours away 
Looked down upon them, "Late!" he seemed to say. 
Yet still they talked, nor moved from where they 

sat. 
Content they were, and happy. On the mat 
In purring comfort drowsed the old gray cat. 

M. Home '22 



THE OLD LEATHER BOX 



"Yes, my life 'as been very hinteresting 
said the English Thimble to me. I picked the 
little creature up, put him on my finger and 
examined him. 

"Hi was born about 1790, hin one hof the 
dearest little tinker shops hin Hengland. You 
see, hi am not solid silver, like many others 
whom hi know. Hi look like hit, but hi'm not. 
Hi believe hin telling the truth, halways ! 
Whell, to go hon with my story. Ha little 



hold man, by the name hof 'ill made me. 'E 
spent ha lot hof time making my happearance 
has beautiful has possible. Hafter my comple- 
tion, hi was put hon the 'and 'ewn wooden 
counter to be sold. Hi wasn't there very long, 
for ha young man bought me hand put me hin 
'is money pouch, and before long hi was hon 
the finger hof one hof the dearest young girls, 
my many heyes 'ad hever seen. 

"She smiled very sweetly hand said to my 
purchaser, 'Halbert, 'ow can hi thank you for 
this little gift!' 

" 'Hoh, very heasily, my dear !' said 'e. 
'Just use hit when you sew for me, likewise 
the future Mortimer family!' 

" 'Halbert Mortimer ! You don't — you mean 
that you wish me to marry you?' hanswered 
Jane with surprise. 

"Hi needn't go hinto detail habout the ro- 
mance that followed. You very well know 
the houtcome, because, I whouldn't be 'ere to 
tell you this if hit 'ad turned hout differently. 

"Hafter a few months my master and mis- 
tress moved hinto the dearest little Henglish 
'ut himaginable ! Halbert hand Jane were 
very 'appy together, hand part of their joy 
whas William, the first hof the merry fam- 
ily. Hi 'elped make hall hof 'is clothes, hand 
then has the family hincreased my work hin- 
creased also. 

"When the children where holder, we moved 
to Hamerica. My, whill I hever forget that 
voyage ! Hit was fearful ! So much money 
was taken from their savings hon this trip, 
that my mistress hand hi 'ad to work all day 
to 'elp make life agreeable ! But, hafter 
hawhile, things became heasier. 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Hafter many years, hall hof the children 
'ad found new 'omes for themselves, hand my 
dear master and mistress became hold hand 
gray. I realized that Jane's work was drawing 
to han hend. My realization was right. She 
died hat the hage hof seventy, I believe. Hin 
ha few years, Halbert followed 'er. It seemed 
as though my life was hended too! Hafter 
that, I was hin one sewing basket after han- 
other. Finally, your mother took me and put 
me hin this box. Hi 'ave told you my life hex- 
periences hand now hit his time to put me 
back. One hof the hother Thimbles his say- 
ing that 'e wants to tell 'is 'istory." 

I did as the Thimble wished. Then, I chose 
another which looked somewhat like the one 
I had just heard. 

"Well, little fellow, what have you to say?" 
I asked. 

"First, I am a German, und I belong to the 
Renter family. My birth dates back to about 
the same time as Mr. English Thimble's. Den 
in place uff being made in a shop, Fritz Ren- 
ter, a nice old man carved me into mein shape. 
Inside uff me, you vill see dot I have initials, 
und der date. He did dot, too. Instead uff 
a young luffer giving it to his luffed one, old 
Mr. Renter gave it to his daughter-in-law for 
un pressant uff marriage. Oh, I vas so happy 
mit her. Ve had such goot time togedder! 
Rosina Renter, the daughter-in-law, had un 
enormous family, und meinen eyes very nearly 
poked out, ve sewed so much to keep die kin- 
der veil clothed. Ven Rose, da oldest von, vas 
about ten years olt, ve all came over to United 
States. Vat I saw uff it vas grand ! Ve vent 
to Chicago und I have been dere ever since. 
Von day my mistress Rosina told me dot 
Rose vas engaged to nice young man by der 
name uff Evans. Veil, ve sewed und sewed 
for many days, und den Rose vas married. 

"Der issn't much to tell now, because after 
die udder children ver married, Rosina und 
Heiney stayed togedder in der olt house. Nun, 
I did not sew much, for Rosina's eyes ver bad ; 
but I presided in her sewing bag. Den my 
mistress died, und Rose took me. After her 



death your mother, who is her daughter as 
you know, took me. Und den she put me in 
diss box mit diese udder Thimbles. Mein 
story is done, und. I vill give my turn to some 
udder von." 

After putting the German Thimble in his 
place, I picked up the third one and put it 
on my finger. No sooner had I done this than 
he began to talk. I listened very eagerly. 

"My mistress," said he, in a shrill little 
voice, "was Mary Ann Mortimer, the wife 
of the young William Mortimer whom the 
English Thimble told you about. I am a true 
American and instead of being made by a 
tinker, I was made at one of the jewellers in 
Chicago, about 1870. Don't you like the pat- 
tern of my trimmings? Personally, I think 
that my figure, too, is stunning! I may not 
be so old as the Messrs. German and English 
Thimble, but my style is far more fetching 
than theirs. 

"Oh, yes ! You must know all about me ! I 
was in a show case with a lot of other Thim- 
bles, but they weren't half so nice as I. One 
day a little girl came into the store. I shall 
never forget her as long as I live ! She was 
rather attractive ; her face was plump and her 
eyes were a beautiful blue, with such an im- 
ploring expression. She said to the waiting 
clerk. 

" 'Pleath, thur, may I thee thum thimbleth?' 
'With pleasure, young lady !' replied he, 
showing his wares. 

"After looking them over, she chose me. 

" 'And Mithter,' said she, 'Pleath mark it— 
"Mother Dear— From Ida-May "." 

"The clerk did as requested, and I was given 
to her mother as a Christmas present. You 
see, Ida-May is your father's oldest sister. 
After a while your father was born. How I 
can remember pushing needles for his dear 
little clothes ! Such fun Mary Ann and I did 
have ! 

"Then came the Chicago Fire. I was tossed 
around and given up for lost, until one day 
your grandfather, Mary Ann's husband, found 
me in a coat pocket of his. 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Your father, aunts and uncles soon grew 
up and had homes of their own. How I have 
sewed for them ! I remember making a lot of 
your clothes. 

"There is no need of my telling you more be- 
cause you know the rest. Anyway, here I 
am with the others, and here I wish to remain." 

I put him back and gently took the last 
Thimble, to hear its history. With some irri- 
tation he at once remarked : 

"That Thimble talked as if he were about 
the best one of the lot ! He is sadly mistaken. 
I certainly am just as good as he ! 

"Mr. Evans, your other grandfather, a 
young man then, had been married for a year 
when he bought me. He gave me to your 
grandmother, who was the Rose Renter men- 
tioned by one of my companions. You should 
have seen the glow in her eyes and the ex- 
pression on her face when he put me on her 
finger. Oh ! I had the best feeling when he did 
that, because I knew I was making her happy. 
We got along fine together. I made all of 
your mother's clothes, or at least I aided the 
needle in doing so, and I felt rather proud of 
the lovely creations. 

"By the time your mother and father were 
married, I had indeed earned my keep. But 
my labors were not over. The Thimble that 
talked last said something about helping to 
make your clothes when you were small. 
That's nothing. Why mention trifles? His 
toil has no comparison with mine — none 
whatsoever ! 

"Well, my life with your grandmother 
wasn't very long, because, as you know, she 
died when you were very young. How happy 
are the memories of my many good times 
with her! 

"Please, Miss, put me back, for I feel as if 
I should not be kept long from my associates ; 
although they think me still young and fool- 
ish." 

After listening to the tales of those four 
Thimbles I closed the leather box and started 
to put it on the table beside me. It disap- 
peared ! How queer ! What was the trou- 



ble ? For some reason or other I couldn't make 
myself move ! All of a sudden I found myself 
in bed struggling to start on my search for the 
lost article. After rubbing my eyes and 
thinking a bit, I came to! The leather box 
with its contents, is an heirloom greatly prized 
by my mother and during the day we had been 
talking of its treasures. Fact and fancy had 
therefore mingled in my dream. 

Eva-May Mortimer. 



SAYING ADIEU 



In spite of wishing to graduate, 

In spite of grumbling 'bout things we don't hate, 

In spite of our habit of poking fun, 

We love our Lasell days, every one. 

And now that we're really preparing to go, 

It isn't the happiest thing, you know, 

To say "au revoir" to each dear friend 

And feel way down deep that it's truly the end. 

But leave you we must, so to you we all say : — 
Appreciate everything while you still may, 
For sometime, like us, you'll not want to be through 
And the thing you'll hate most will be saying, 
"adieu". 

Bu F. Orlady '23 

MY HOME TOWN 



Have you ever heard of Augusta, Maine? 
Well — living there all my life, I have labored 
under the impression that every one must know 
where Augusta is and all about it, too. But 
when I arrived here at school and told the girls 
where I was from, a blank expression spread 
over their faces ; for very few of them had 
even heard of the place before. Then it was 
my turn to look blank. How could any living 
mortal not know about Augusta ? It is sad but 
true ; and so I will write a brief essay on "my 
home town." 

This city is situated just beyond a pic- 
turesque bend in the Kennebec River. Con- 
trary to the song, my home town is not "a one- 
horse town", but just crowded with street cars 
and automobiles. Some interesting historic 
tales are told concerning the Pilgrims locating 
there. Benedict Arnold also stopped there at 
an old fort, which has recently been remodeled 
and is now like the original one of 1800. 



LASELL LEAVES 



Augusta being the capital of Maine, tourists 
and visitors are always rambling around the 
State House. It is an imposing structure of 
white granite, on the very top of which is a 
huge statue of Liberty holding a torch. When 
lighted at night it looks very impressive. 
Every other winter the Legislature meets and 
then there are many gay times in the city. 

One of my grandmother's childhood friends, 
Mrs. James G. Blaine, gave her home to the 
State for a Governor's mansion in memory of 
her only son who was killed in the World War. 
The estate has been repaired and is now one 
of the most beautiful homes in the city. 

Augusta, too, is quite a commercial center. 
There are two shoe factories — the Eaton and 
the Crawford; a woolen and cotton mill; two 
publishing houses; and a drug manufactory. 
The farms outside the city are all rich in crops 
of early corn, potatoes, and apples. 

As to the inhabitants of Augusta. No ! We 
are not all savage Indians ; there are no bears 
and wild cats running around loose. The only 
time we see anything of that sort is when the 
circus comes to town. And as for weather — 
the summers are very warm and usually quite 
rainy ; once in four or five years we have a 
very dry summer and then all the crops decay 
in the ground. The fall and spring in Maine 
are especially beautiful. 

You may be surprised, but nevertheless it is 
true, that many brilliant men live in Augusta. 
Among them are Judge Whitehouse, Judge 
Cornish, John Nelson, Guy P. Gannett, and 
Tudor Gardiner. The late John F. Hill and 
James G. Blaine were residents of the city. 
Some of our women are quite noted ; for in- 
stance, Laura E. Richards, Emma Ames, and 
Helen York, not to mention several Lasell 
graduates and students. 

We have very fine schools and churches. 
The standard of our High School is excellent, 
as is also that of our grammar schools. Of 
course we have other public buildings, such as 
our Public Library, Augusta General Hospital, 
Insane Asylum, County Jail and Court House. 

Augusta is becoming more of a sport center 



every year. In the summer we enjoy the use 
of a fine country estate which has been made 
into a club house. The links there are un- 
usually good. Last winter we had a Winter 
Carnival for the first time, and it was so suc- 
cessful that Mr. William Gannett, a promoter 
of all sports, went to Switzerland this fall to 
get some new ideas for the Carnival this 
winter. 

And just another word — we dress just like 
the folks from New York, California, or 
Wyoming ! 

Now if you have gained any knowledge 
from what I have written I am much encour- 
aged and feel sure that in time I shall have 
every one here educated to the fact that Au- 
gusta is a prosperous, busy, commercial and 
social center — not a cold, barren clearing in 
the backwoods. 

Anna Hendee, '24. 



HOMEWARD BOUND 



The day has come : 

I'm going home. 

Oh, the packing, rushing, pushing, 

And at last the train ! 

What a world of waiting this is ! 

Shall I buy a magazine? 

My eyes are so tired 

Gazing at the glistening snow. 

There is so much studying to be done. 
What a wonderful feeling it would be 
To return to school 
My lessons done ! 

My Christmas list is not complete : 

That is the thing 

I should concentrate upon ; 

I can see the mail man now, — 

Oh, the anticipations ! 

How am I able to write 
When there is so much noise about me ; 
Why will that woman persist in talking, 
That every one in the car must hear 
About her petty affairs? 

Barbara Pinkham. 








>Tfojr tjt( 



"Day by day, in every way, we are growing 
better and better." At this time of the year, 
we often feel that our work is growing too 
difficult for us. Examinations face us, and 
the thought, "I can't," runs through our minds. 
The forlorn expressions on our faces manifest 
discontentment and brood discouragement in 
our daily work. Let us substitute, "I can," 
for the despondent "I can't." Let us go about 
our duties with an assurance that we are cap- 
able of doing that which is required of us. 
Let us spend the time when we would be en- 
tertaining thoughts of dread and fear, in ad- 
mitting into our minds new thoughts of as- 
surance. I am sure we shall find them most 
helpful when examinations finally do come. 
If we carry along our work with confidence in 
ourselves we shall be satisfied that we are ful- 
filling our duty. We shall then be able to en- 
ter, with hearty enthusiasm, into the enjoyable 
diversions which are in store for us, because 
we shall feel deserving of them. In this way 
we shall encourage in the school a spirit of 
which Lasell may well be proud. Let Dr. 
Coue's motto, "Day by day, in every way, we 
are growing better and better", be ours also. 

Alice Wry. 



Faneuil Hall, the Library, Cambridge and 
Harvard, — how many of us have really at- 
tempted to make memories of them ours ? Do 
you not think that when you leave Lasell you 
should bear away with you a knowledge of the 
typical that is in New England? Only by 
such appreciation can the East and West be 
truly joined, and provincialism in our coun- 
try be a thing forgotten. 

H. L. C. 



Do all of us realize what our environment 
is for nine months ? New England ! The 
place is full of interest and charm ; Boston is 
actually composed of crooked old streets lined 
with old and timeworn, but still representa- 
tive buildings. The churches in Boston, 
where we are privileged to go, have men in 
their pulpits whom we should gladly hear. 
The Museum of Fine Arts, Old South Church, 



Did you ever stop to think how many times 
an enterprise that to all outward appearances 
was a great success, has become a complete 
failure? And did you ever stop to speculate 
on the cause? 

Many times some one has been struggling 
along, writing perhaps a book, a song, or a 
poem, and the dark zero hour of almost cer- 
tain failure looms up ahead. It is then he 
needs friends and that kindly little word or 
shove that changes the complete outlook. 

It is quite possible, however, that you do 
not greatly admire the attempt. What differ- 
ence does that make? Speed him on his way 
and from your encouragement surely some- 
thing good will emerge; and maybe you will 
gain a priceless possession, — a friend. 

If one accomplishes something tell him of 
it and help to keep alive the little spark of joy 
that comes when one feels he is appreciated. 

Most of you have seen those famous car- 
toons of Briggs,- — "When A Feller Needs a 
Friend." It is just such moments as these 
that we need to do away with, and can, if we 
are willing to give a little bit of ourselves. 

0. /. H. 




January 13 quite a large group attended 
Walter Hampden's presentation of Hamlet in 
the Boston Opera House. The dramatic in- 
terpretation enabled us who have been study- 
ing the text of Hamlet to understand so much 
better his soliloquies of self-disparagement, 
and to judge better his nobility of mind, cour- 
age, high moral instincts, and his utter lack 
of self-pity. 

While Mr. Hampden was not supported by 
so strong a cast as one might wish, yet his 
own interpretations were so powerful and so 
well received that we realized, once again, 
"Shakespeare is not for a nation or a genera- 
tion, but for all peoples and all times !" 

January 14th a party attended "Elijah" 
given by the People's Choral Union of Boston 
and conducted by our Mr. George Dunham. 
The rendering of the oratorio was, of course, 
all that could be desired. The contralto solo 
part was sung by Miss Gertrude Tingley, a 
former Lasell student, which made it espe- 
cially interesting for our girls. 

Our lecturer of January 20th was Mrs. E. 
L. Gulick who told us about the school in 
Spain that we help to support, founded by 
Alice Gulick. 

The Christian Endeavor Society has had 
two meetings since Christmas, the first led by 
Ruth Dinsmore and the second by our fav- 
orite "old girl", Miss Potter, whose subject 
was Love. 



On January 17th we were delighted to hear 
the children's Christmas cantata at the Meth- 
odist Church. Their voices blended delight- 
fully and Mrs. Harper deserves great credit 
for their training. The diminutive soloists 
maintained a "stage presence" that many an 
older amateur might well envy. 

Mr. E. J. Winslow spoke to us January 13th 
on progress in recent years compared to that 
of the early ages. Evidently Jehu would have 
had to "go some" to keep pace with our 
present day rate of speed. 

At Vespers January 14th Dr. J. Edgar Park 
spoke to us on the subject of Fear. He drew 
the golden mean between fearing everything 
and fearing nothing. In his original, droll 
manner he related an amusing ghost story to 
illustrate one of his points. 

Dr. Drew spoke to us at Vespers January 
21st about four mental re-adjustments — 
truth, excellence, love and service — that make 
for success and happiness in life. 

The Seniors are planning to give a snow 
carnival behind Gardner Gym. The new to- 
boggan slide has just been smoothed and 
straightened so the coasting is much less dan- 
gerous and great fun. 

The Glee and Mandolin Clubs had an inter- 
esting and most enjoyable time on Sunday 
evening, January 7th. We were invited to tea 
at the Franklin Square House and to give a 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



concert in the evening. The Glee and Man- 
dolin Clubs gave several numbers and Mr. 
Griffith, the leader of the two organizations, 
played in his delightful way several violin 
selections. 

The members of the Clubs regret very much 
to have Mr. Griffith leave us, but he is called 
to China on a several months' business trip. 
However, he assured us he would be back 
again in Boston in time to drill us for the 
annual spring concert. 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 



A jolly ■ Christmas holiday time is over. 
Three little girls remained at Woodland Park 
for most of the vacation. The snow king was 
generous, and much time was spent coasting — 
the best sport of all. Since the New Year 
we have had a series of winter sports, — sleds, 
skates, and skiis, — in every available place. 

Mrs. Furlong chaperoned the girls of the 
Junior High in Boston, Saturday afternoon, 
January 13th, to see Walter Hampden in "The 
Merchant of Venice" at the Boston Opera 
House. The bond plot with its tragic figure of 
Shylock, the exciting choice of marriage from 
the jewel caskets, Portia's sweet and digni- 
fied bearing in the court of law and the en- 
chanting beauty of the moonlight scene, 
caused deep appreciation and delight, and a 
unanimous desire to see another Shakespeare 
play right off! 

After a coasting party by moonlight on 
Saturday evening, January 20th, we had a 
delightful surprise in an "Eats" party in the 
living-room when Hazel and Maxine Law- 
rence generously shared a box from home. A 
big crackling fire in the fire-place added more 
cheer. 

A private school is very dependent upon 
the strong personality of the people who con- 
trol it. After meeting Miss Susan Ganong, it 
is easy to understand how Netherwood School 
for girls in Rothsay, New Brunswick has come 
to be known as one of the best girls' schools 
in Canada. Miss Ganong was a classmate 



of Mrs. Winslow at Smith College and to the 
renewal of their friendship we are indebted. 
It has been a real pleasure to have Miss 
Ganong and her assistant, Miss Stoddard, 
spend a little time with us. Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow and Miss Potter also honored us 
when Miss Ganong and Miss Stoddard came 
to dine with the Junior School and to see the 
younger Lasell group in its home and school 
environment. 



TWILIGHT PICTURES 



I sat in the window seat, 
Looking into the twilight. 
White heaps of snow, 
Black trees in bold relief, 
Against the fading yellow 
Of the winter sky. 

What is it that grips me so? 

Why does this time, 

Of all others, 

Make me feel nearer people; 

Make me sense their joys and 

Heartaches ? 

In the windows 

Of the houses, I can see 

Lights flash. 

Is it for the coming of a father? 

A husband? 

Or is a lonely, white-haired woman 

Trying to shut off the memories 

That come stealing back 

At this hour? 

Across the street 

A man bounds up the steps : 

The door opens ; 

A troop of noisy, pushing 

Youngsters 

Make a grab for him; 

And framed in the lighted doorway, 

A smiling woman. 

The. door shuts, 

The picture is gone; 

But for the moment, 

I was one of that happy group. 

Why does this hour 

Fascinate me? 

Why do I lose myself, 

Forget my silly frets, 

In the lives of these people 

I see from my window seat? 

Betty Bristow. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 




The Leaves extends its heartiest congratu- 
lations and Godspeed to the Lasell holiday 
brides and grooms of 1922-1923. 

On the twenty-eighth of December Irvina 
Pomeroy '18 became the bride of Mr. Raphael 
Dunham Cooper. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper will 
be at home at 4340 Lake Park Ave., Chicago. 

Natalie York and Mr. Richard Van Dien 
Terry were united in marriage on the six- 
teenth of January. Mr. and Mrs. Terry will 
be at home after the first of February at 113 
Warwick St., La Porte, Indiana. 

Louise Funkhouser Williams '09 was mar- 
ried to Mr. Kenneth Wallace Colegrove on 
the fifth of January. They will be at home 
at 614 Clark St., Evanston, 111. 

The wedding of Emma W. Perley and Mr. 
Allan Sargent Dewar took place on the twen- 
ty-first of December. 

Esther Morey '12 and Mr. Lee Anthony 
Hain were united in marriage on the twenty- 
first of December. 

Helen Files '20 became the bride of Mr. 
Randolph Foster Debevoise on the twenty- 
seventh of January. 

The fourth of January was the wedding 
day of Mildred Hotchkiss '14 and Mr. Harvey 
Frank Girvin. Mr. and Mrs. Girvin will be 
at home after the first of February at Cor- 
doba, Spain, c/o Spanish Society, al Electro- 
Mechanical Construction. 

Marguerite Mason and Mr. Claude Albert 
Brumbach were united in marriage on the 
sixth of January. They are at home at 201 
Penn St., Reading, Pa. 



Muriel James '20 was married to Mr. Frank 
Kenneth Morrison on the sixth of December. 

Suzita Espy and Mr. Wallace R. Pearson 
were united in marriage on the sixth of Octo- 
ber. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson are at home at 
the Carmelita Apartments, Portland, Oregon. 

On the fifteenth of November Louise Fur- 
bush '20 became the bride of Mr. Roger Fuller 
Prout. 

The engagement of Helene Westervelt '20 
to Mr. Wagner P. Thielens is announced. 

The engagement announcement of Edith 
Geeson to Charles P. Seewald is received. 

Miss Elsie Flight '18 and Mr. Carl Wueste- 
feld have announced their engagement. 

The engagement of Barbara McLellan '18 
and Mr. Robert Willard McCormick is an- 
nounced. 

Miss Gladys Strople and Mr. Gustave Chris- 
tian Winger have sent out cards announcing 
their engagement. 

Lasell girls for the past few years will be 
pleased to know that Miss Georgie Seely, 
our nurse at Woodland Park, and Mr. Ever- 
ett James Chambers have announced their en- 
gagement. 

Edith Anthony Carlow's ('06) note of ap- 
preciation to Dr. Winslow is so genuinely fine 
that we have begged the privilege of quoting a 
few lines from it. "I declined to be a candi- 
date a year ago as a member of the School 
Board, but this year felt that I must yield to 
the desires of a coterie of friends much inter- 
ested in the welfare of our city." Edith 
speaks especially of the copy of the Alma 
Mater set to music which was the unique 
Christmas card sent by our Principal and 
Mrs. Winslow to the "old girls". 

Among the recent old-girl visitors at Lasell 
were Lydia Adams '18, Ethelle Cleale '22 and 
Ruth Adler '20. Lydia had just been visiting 
Octavia Hickcox Smith '18 and was espe- 
cially enthusiastic over the little daughter in 
that family. Church work takes a great deal 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



of Lydia's time, but this born traveller is al- 
ways interested to talk up "new worlds to 
conquer" with our Preceptress. Harriet Dar- 
ling Morris '18 and Dorothy Raymond also 
visited us recently. 

That was a dear note of appreciation which 
Julia Rankin '20 sent to Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low thanking them for their Alma Mater 
Christmas greeting and it also contains some 
interesting Lasell news. Julia was one of the 
bridesmaids at Marguerite Hardy Chandler's 
('20) wedding, the other bridesmaids being 
Mildred Freeman, Dorothy Burnham '20, and 
Alletta Eldredge. Freda Griffin '20 also was 
one of the wedding party. Julia is busy with 
her Girl Scout work and is continuing her 
vocal music and finds something worth while to 
occupy her every moment. She hears often 
from her roommate, Helen Balcom '20, who 
has become quite a famous traveller. Julia 
subscribes to the Leaves and promises to 
come to Lasell soon. The latchstring will be 
out for you, Julia. 

There never was a more welcome visitor 
than dear Jean McKay who came back to her 
school home from Montana recently. She 
did not stay long enough. "While in these 
parts" she was the guest of Nan Stronach '18. 
In her own inimitable way she writes, "Six 
years have only made our Nancy the nicer." 
She came East with that progressive Lenette 
Rogers '17, and among other things we find 
Lenette is well on her way for her Ph.D. de- 
gree from the University of Wisconsin. She 
was East not only to visit her family, but to 
attend an important convention of biologists 
which was held in Boston. In New York 
Jean was the guest of Miss Nellie Warner, 
who at present is happy in her chosen work, 
namely, one of the directors of the Girl Scouts 
of New Jersey. Jean writes, "I have heard 
lots of music, been to lots of plays and am 
daily storing away things to remember in 
Montana. It was so good to 'come home' 
again and a real pleasure to find it as it was, 
changes where changes were best and the 
familiar places unchanged." Jean's closing 



words are well worth reading, — "I am going 
home so much more satisfied to know that 
things are going well with you. Lasell de- 
serves a future and these have been hard times 
to pass through." 

Recently a group of Lasell folk were fav- 
ored by hearing at Symphony Hall a splendid 
rendition of the Oratorio of Elijah given by 
the People's Choral Union under the direction 
of a member of our faculty, Mr. George Saw- 
yer Dunham. The Boston papers were very 
complimentary in their notices. Among other 
things the Boston Herald said of the con- 
ductor, "For this visionary performance no 
better equipped conductor than Mr. Dunham 
need be sought. Last night he proved the 
truth of the late Franzcon Davies' plain dic- 
tum : 'If people today find oratorio dull, it is 
the fault of those who perform it.' The de- 
spair of the early part of the action Mr. Dun- 
ham made poignant ; to the scene between the 
widow and Elijah he gave true dramatic point ; 
in the choruses of the Baal worshippers he 
found a contrast more striking than one would 
have believed possible to the sturdy measures 
of Elijah; and throughout the scene of the 
prayer for rain with the final, 'Thanks Be to 
God' he built up a steady climax, with never 
a second of sag, no less than masterly. A man 
of skill and temperament can indeed do much." 
We were also proud to recognize in the con- 
tralto soloist our own Gertrude Tingley. Of 
her rendition the paper says, "To the meas- 
ures of the Queen, Miss Tingley gave drama- 
tic value ; she is to be thanked for not clouding 
her lovely voice with the gloom in which most 
contraltos revel when they sing, 'Woe Unto 
Them.' " 

Irene Bollman '14 spent an afternoon at 
Lasell recently and left this friendly word for 
our Preceptress : "This has been a most in- 
teresting afternoon for me, and it brought 
back many fond memories. I hope to visit 
Lasell more frequently in the future and shall 
look forward to seeing you." A good New 
Year's resolution, Irene. Be sure to keep it. 

Time and distance do not lessen Marie 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



Cogswell Gelinsky's ('06) love for her Alma 
Mater. In her kind note to Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow at Christmas time she tells of her 
busy life and how her family are at present 
scattered so that much of her holiday 
was spent in packing boxes for the children 
away at school. Along with her word of ap- 
preciation she sent her annual subscription 
to the Leaves. She writes, "I do enjoy the 
Personals, as they are about the only means 
I have of learning what my classmates are 
doing and, of course, knowing how the school 
is progressing." She closes with best wishes 
for Lasell. 

From Jeanne Hyde '21 of Kimberley, Idaho, 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow received a word of 
Christmas greeting. She refers in these loyal 
terms to the Lasell Alma Mater greeting card : 
"The words are so true, 'bound firm by a 
bond unbroken'. I will always feel a love 
for dear old Lasell, and my best wishes are 
always for her and those who have meant so 
much to me when I was there and since." 

Leontine Goodman Thalheimer '18 sends 
with her subscription to the Leaves a word of 
appreciation to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow for the 
greeting which she describes as "novel and 
spirited." After the fashion of a true Lasell 
girl she declared, "I received the first copy a 
few days ago, and I stopped everything to 
devour its contents." Leontine is living in her 
apartment in New Haven and writes, "I am 
doing my own work, so my training from 'P. 
K.' days at Lasell is coming in very handy." 
She speaks of having met Marion Beach '16. 
Also she sends cordial greetings to all the peo- 
ple of the faculty and best wishes to Lasell. 

It is sixty-six years since Mrs. Flora Drew 
Sampson '57 was graduated from Lasell, but 
her holiday greeting to Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low was among the brightest and best re- 
ceived. She expresses her appreciation of 
their kind remembrance in these words, "It 
seemed to be especially appropriate for what 
my grandson calls (now he is one of them 
from Harvard) 'the old grads' and was par- 
ticularly welcome as a reminder of the days 



at dear old Lasell. I wish my health and that 
of my husband permitted an occasional visit 
to the Seminary, but I am prevented from 
availing myself of your always cordial wel- 
come. With the compliments of the Season 
and many wishes for the New Year, I am 
cordially yours." Was there ever among 
Lasell graduates of all these years a more 
loyal alumna than our dear Mrs. Sampson? 
Through the courtesy of Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low the Personal Editor of the Leaves has 
been allowed to enjoy Annie Mae Pinkham 
Allyn's ('02) delightful Christmas letter. We 
are moved to quote every word of it, but space 
will not allow. We trust the dear writer will 
not think we have presumed upon her good 
nature by sharing as much of her message as 
we do with the readers of the Leaves. She 
very kindly opened her letter, "Upon receipt 
of the Leaves this morning I sat right down 
and devoured it from page to page. I was 
surprised to find after all these years that I 
could find so much of interest in it and so am 
sending my subscription at once. I have found 
a Lasell girl in Montreal whom I see quite 
often and we talk over the old school, — Mrs. 
Wm. N. Welch, formerly Helen Norcross '18. 
She spent most of her time at Woodland Park, 
I believe. I had hoped to be with you last 
June for my 20th reunion, but was unable to 
leave home and my many family cares. I 
have trained Marjorie, our daughter, in the 
Lasell way and for the past six months she 
has been getting up and preparing breakfast 
before she started for school and she also pre- 
pares the evening meal. She is a fine girl — 
far bigger than I was when at Lasell. I had 
always hoped to send her back to my Alma 
Mater, but with seven to think of will have 
to change some of my plans — am still hoping 
one of the girls may go there. I see by the 
roster in the Leaves that you have a Pinkham 
this year, — I think it is the first time since my 
day as I've always watched the names with 
interest. Thank you for the Christmas greet- 
ing and Alma Mater song. I am still singing 
and keeping up my interest in musical af- 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



fairs — especially this winter as I have charge 
of all the music of the American Women's 
Club, and am also doing some studying again 
as I felt I needed it. I am also keeping up my 
interest in the line of work which Mrs. Wins- 
low taught me, for I've had the chairmanship 
of the Current Events committee in the 
Women's Club of our town of Montreal West, 
which has necessitated writing of papers, etc. 
I have one due in February on Canadian Au- 
thors. Last year I heard a talk by a member 
of the Canadian Authors Association which 
interested me so much that I spoke of it with 
the result that I was asked to give them an 
afternoon on the subject. I am sending you 
under separate cover a photograph of the 
family taken last June when my husband went 
to his 20th class reunion at Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. They always run 
a photograph gallery of their children each 
five years and each time so far we have taken 
away the prize. I had counted on attending 
my own reunion at the same time and taking 
the photograph, but it seemed no one was 
going back from our class and at the time I 
had no help and the children were all in the 
midst of June examinations, so I had to give 
it up. I really feel I must have the prize group 
of the school in point of members, for I hear 
of all the girls having one, two or three, and 
it makes my family look tremendous, but I can 
assure you it is wonderful now they are get- 
ting so big, to have such a crowd around and 
they are all so devoted to Mary Louise and 
she has been the happiest baby I ever saw from 
the very first — because of so much love and 
devotion, I guess. I am only afraid she will 
be spoiled by it. I am trying to develop an 
orchestra among them. Helen plays the vio- 
lin, Nancy the piano, and Horace has a banjo- 
mandolin. Marjorie has played the piano, but 
her talent seems to be more along domestic 
lines." She closes her letter with best wishes 
for the school. 

In a fall number of The Commonwealth, 
edited by the Massachusetts Department of 



Public Health, we were proud to find an arti- 
cle by the president of our Alumnae Associa- 
tion, Evelyn Schmidt '14, which was read at 
the annual meeting of the American Dental 
Association at Los Angeles, California, and 
which was printed in the Journal of the Amer- 
ican Dental Association. There were one or 
two sentences in this masterful message which 
we are moved to quote. "Herbert Spencer 
once said in a prophetic moment, 'To be a 
nation of "good animals" is the first condition 
to national prosperity.' Likewise, the pros- 
perity of a state is measured by the health of 
its citizens. The first dental clinic in Massa- 
chusetts for people with limited incomes was 
established in 1876 coincident with the Har- 
vard Dental School. In 1874 the first dispen- 
sary dental clinic was opened. Dental serv- 
ice in the beginning was primarily for adults, 
but in 1908 a step toward preventive dentistry 
was taken, for it was then that the first school 
dental clinic was founded, a clinic primarily 
for children." This is Evelyn's specialty in 
which she has been pre-eminently successful. 

A note was received recently from Irene 
Sauter Sanford '06 containing the sad news 
of the passing away of her mother. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sauter were with Irene for Christmas 
Day and the day following. On New Year's 
Day the little mother was laid to rest. Our 
tenderest sympathy is extended to these be- 
reaved friends. 

We expected that Laurestein Foster would 
make good at Smith and she did and enjoys 
her new school home. Nevertheless it is sort 
of a selfish satisfaction, perhaps, that we read 
in her note, "I am enjoying my college work im- 
mensely, but more than once I have been home- 
sick for Lasell and all my dear friends there. 
I enjoyed my short visit at Lasell in the fall 
more than I can say." 

Helen Heath '07 sends this interesting word 
to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow : "Your very cordial 
Christmas greetings found me in Buffalo, my 
family having moved here from Morristown 
a year ago last June. We find this big city 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



very different from the home-town and al- 
though we are making new friends, our hearts 
are still with the old friends there and else- 
where. Lilian Douglass, Gertrude Bragdon 
Edwards, Lois Blaisdell Baker and I keep up 
a fair correspondence and we never forget 
to mention dear old Lasell days. I do appre- 
ciate your kind thought and greeting." 

Nina Dietz Harwood '11 writes, "Please 
send the Leaves to Mrs. Benjamin P. Har- 
wood, 29 Gardens Apartment, Forest Hills, 
Long Island, New York." We feel quite sure 
that Nina's old friends will want this, her new 
address. She also thanks Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low for their Christmas Greeting in these 
gracious words : "I am sure the sentiment 
contained therein and your thoughtfulness in 
sending it will be sincerely appreciated by all 
the old girls." 

To the newcomers, the dear Lasell children, 
who have come to gladden tht homes of our 
Lasell girls since our last publication we ex- 
tend a loving welcome. On the list are : 

To Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Holman (Kath- 
erine Forgie '20) a son, Robert Bruce Hol- 
man. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Bruce V. Wakefield 
( Maude Wetherbee '15 ) a daughter, Mary 
Elizabeth Wakefield. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Moyer (Con- 
stance Allen '18) a son, Robert Allyn Moyer. 

Amy Tuthill Smith '18 sent Miss Potter a 
letter in the place of a Christmas card. It 
certainly proved a delightful and satisfactory 
substitute. Amy begins by expressing a 
strong hope that she will be with us at Com- 
mencement time and enjoy the fifth reunion 
of her class. Her husband is a member of 
the faculty of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College at Amherst. Amy finds the town a 
delightful place in which to live and seems to 
be surrounded with pleasant friends, espe- 
cially among the faculty. She also adds, "I 
occasionally see Carroll Towne. He is a mem- 
ber of the same fraternity as my husband and 
was our guest at dinner recently." Amy has 
had one or two delightful visits from her 



sister Ruth and one evening Sue Tiffany '15 
drove up from Springfield. Prof, and Mrs. 
Smith spent Christmas at their New York 
home, Moravia, and expected to meet Doris 
Gorke '18, who is now at home in Syracuse. 

Carrie Kendig Kellogg 79 is spending an- 
other delightful winter in Columbia, S. C, 
and as usual is active in church and literary 
circles. She especially enjoys the fine music 
which is one of the unique attractions of Co- 
lumbia. 

A dear letter recently received from Susan 
Tiffany '15 reports her well and at present 
devoting a great deal of her time to an invalid 
aunt. She gives us a good report of Florence 
Hudson Lake '09. Florence is now a success- 
ful teacher in Westfield and keeps in touch 
with the latest educational methods by attend- 
ing the summer school at Hyannis. 

Next to seeing our near neighbor, Marion 
Hale Bottomley '10, came the joy of receiving 
a delightful message from her. She reports 
her sisters, Emily Hale Barnett and Laura 
Plale Gorton '16 and their families enjoying 
the best of health; also good news from their 
mother who seems indeed like one of our La- 
sell family by adoption. Marion tells us some 
interesting news concerning Anne Hale, her 
two-year-old daughter and little Mary Phil- 
lips who arrived only last July. She also 
promises to be with us at the Mid- Winter Re- 
union. That was an interesting and unusual 
happening to your class Round Robin letters, 
Marion ! Few classes have two epistles on 
the road at the same time. One, I believe she 
said, was lost for several years and suddenly 
came to light. It must indeed have furnished 
amusement to have read the letter and noted 
the changes since it was written. Thank you, 
too, for that most charming picture of Bessie 
Robinson Breed '18 and her little son Allen 
which was published in the Hartford papers. 
We are looking forward to the day when Bes- 
sie will venture to introduce her little Allen 
to the girls at Lasell. 

It seems good to have Mrs. Towne at home 
again very much improved in health and also 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



to have Mr. and Mrs. Wagner back from their 
visit in the South. 

Jean Swift came out to visit her old school 
friends and has decided to enlist in the office 
corps. We welcome her heartily. 

Mildred Hotchkiss Girvin '14 had fixed 
upon the early spring as the season for her 
marriage, but a fine business opportunity 
opened for Mr. Girvin and instead they were 
married the fourth of January and sailed at 
once for their new home. Mr. Girvin is a 
metallurgist and is to be in charge of the con- 
struction of a copper refinery company at 
Cordoba, Spain. Our blessings follow this 
bride and groom on their rather unusual wed- 
ding journey. 

One of the most unique Christmas cards 
which came to our Principal and his wife 
was a laughing picture of Carolyn Lindsay 
Haney '20 and her dear little son. 

In a personal note to our Preceptress, Dor- 
othy Ely '21 announces her engagement to Dr. 
Reginald Bigham. One of the Newark daily 
papers contains a charming picture of Dorothy 
and below makes the formal announcement 
of this engagement with the added word that 
the wedding will take place in the spring. 
Dorothy has fixed April as the month. Dor- 
othy has time to express her loyalty to Lasell 
and a longing to frequently revisit her Alma 
Mater. In speaking of her class friends she 
regrets that Julia Russell Robertson '21 is 
away out in the State of Washington, but Ju- 
lia's husband, who is a naval officer, may be 
transferred to Washington, D. C, which would 
be the cause of rejoicing on the part of Julia's 
friends. She also adds, "Genevieve Tiernan 
'22 was in New York and we had luncheon 
together and a word or two about everybody 
at Lasell." In closing she adds, "I am hoping 
that Marjorie Loomis '21 will be on for the 
wedding. Am planning fully to be at Lasell 
for the Commencement reunion in June." 

We were sorry to learn through Barbara 
Jones Bates '14 that her dear sister, Nell Jones 
Yoemans '05, had broken her ankle during the 



Christmas-tide, but we are thankful she is con- 
valescing. 

In a recent note from Miss Edith Williams 
(the former head of our Domestic Science 
Department) she very kindly writes, "I often 
think of the school and wonder if any place 
could have a stronger hold on me than Lasell 
has. Am hoping Frances Dolley will come to 
visit me this spring." She refers to her de- 
lightful visit from Miss Rand last year, has 
recently met Mrs. Rice (the mother of Carol 
and "K") and also Mary Van Arsdale Pitten, 
whose husband is an instructor of Anatomy 
in the University. Mary speaks pleasantly of 
her journey abroad with Lasell's preceptress 
during the opening year of the war. Although 
Miss Williams has worked for and won sev- 
eral degrees in addition to what she had when 
she was with us, these honors have not turned 
her away from her loyalty to our school and 
her friends here. 

It is a happy custom on the part of Lasell's 
poet-friend, Denis A. McCarthy, LL.D., to 
send a favored few at Lasell each year a 
unique Christmas greeting in the form of the 
"Christmas Courier", a little journal of much 
good will, printed and published by Dr. Mc- 
Carthy for purposes purely private and per- 
sonal." We dare to repeat one or two of the 
messages on this friendly greeting. 



'OUR MOTTO" 



No axe to grind, 

No mud to sling, 
No fault to find, 

No foes to sting, 
No aim or end 

But just to say, 
"God bless you, friend, 

On Christmas Day !" 

'HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE 'COURIER' 



In friendship and in fun 
This Journal was begun ; 
In fun and friendship, too, 
We're sending it to> you. 
If it should bring a smile, 
Just think of us the while, 
And your subscription thus 
You'll more than pay to us. 

Dr. Winslow, our Principal, recently visited 
his mother and sister at his old home in Or- 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



leans, Vermont, and incidentally saw a number 
of Lasell girls; among the number Helen 
Beede '21, and had an opportunity to watch 
her in her efficient work as director of Music 
in the Orleans High School. Our Principal 
did not tell us, but the daily paper of Orleans 
did, that while there he gave an interesting ad- 
dress to the students in the high school. 

Lasell is justly proud that one of its own 
"old girls" is the author of a recent book, "The 
Life of Pundita Ramabai." Miss Clementina 
Butler wrote this biography at the invitation 
of the American Ramabai Association. It is 
certainly a delightful story. 

Through the generous courtesy of Louise 
Mayer Schein '11 of Chicago, Miss Potter 
received a most interesting book of travel, "All 
the Way 'Round," by Edith Ogden Harrison, 
wife of a former mayor of Chicago, and a 
warm personal friend of Louise's. 

Mr. Lalley, the father of our Christine and 
Catherine, was a guest recently at Lasell. 
There is never a more welcome visitor to our 
school home than this devoted father. 

Louise Venable's "Uncle Bob" at last ma- 
terialized and made the long promised visit 
to our school. Those of us who were favored 
in meeting Major Robert Green will long re- 
member this delightful Southern gentleman 
who is president of the Southern Club of Bos- 
ton and has frequently extended the hospi- 
tality of the club to our girls who belong 
"Away down South in Dixie." 



JOKES 

Two negroes were arguing. 

"You ain't got no sense," said one. 

"No sense? Den what's dis head of mine 
for?" 

"Head? Dat's no head, niggah, dat's just a 
button on top of your body to keep your 
backbone from unravellin'." 



The Prisoner — "Your honor, it is true I was 
speeding, but I will explain if you will give 
me a little time — " 

His Honor — "Ten days." 



"My, that dog fairly flies." 
"Well, he is a bird dog." 



"I must take your temperature." 

"You can't." ' 

"Why not?" 

"Because the other doctor took it." 



Small Wilfred (seeing the rows of tellers 
and cashiers behind their barred windows) 
"What do they feed 'em, Mother?" 



Foxie — "Say, Grandpa, why do they call 
you Bill?" 

Grandpa — -"Because I was born on the first 
of the month !" 



First — "I'm going to sue my English prof, 
for libel." 

Second— "What for?" 

First — "He wrote on my theme, 'You have 
bad relatives and antecedents'." 



"Do you know anything about Marco 
Polo?" 

"Is it like clock-golf?" 



"What are you crying for?" 
"I forget." 

"Then why do you cry?" 
" 'Cause I can't remember !" 



'Waiter, this meat is tough." 
'Yes, sir, it's Armour." 



"Were you afraid to ask your father for 
money ?" 

"No, I was calm and collected." 



"Mr. Bradley is certainly well read. He re- 
peated an exquisite quotation last night." 

"What was it?" 

"I can't give you the exact words, but he 
said he'd rather be a something in a some- 
thing than a something or other in a something 
else." 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



Irate Professor — "Young man, do you know 
anything about this course?" 

Young man — "A little, sir. What would 
you like to know ?" 



"Your cook is Swedish, isn't she?" 
"Yes, but she speaks in broken China." 



Buettner — "Say, Jean, if a man walks down 
the street and kicks an iron fence three times, 
why is his name Johnson?" 

Merrick — "I don't know, Liz, — why is his 
name Johnson?" 

Buettner — "Well, you see his father's name 
was Johnson !" 



"I'm a major in economics." 
"Where's your uniform?" 



Mother — "Johnny, don't run so fast around 
the house. You'll fall and hurt yourself." 

Johnny — "If I don't run fast it'll hurt any- 
way. Dad's chasing me." 



BAKER'S 
Sweet Chocolate 



MS feMate 



* BAKE R'S « 

CARACAS SW.EETl 

CHOCOLATE 




Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




ax Brothers 

TZomsts 

(Eljoir? &00?B, ItoUta *«*. (PrrlftJts 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 



44 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON 



CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 



FOR 



REAL SERVICE 



Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 

A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 



BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



STUDENTS! 

WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 

SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 

THINK OF 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 



PEMBERTON L7j SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 



A FRIEND 



fluids, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 



L P. Hollander Co. 



Established 1848 



HOTEL SUPPLIES 



57 and 58 N. Market St. 



Boston 



NEW ATTRACTIVE 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 



202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 

BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 
BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 1 % South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



QUALITY -i 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



O. S. REED 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waltham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

Muaxt Sealers 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

That is always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE. NORTH. 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



Gottoriie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 

Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 

1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

iy,l ■ ■ ^ , BOSTON, MASS. 

Who also make Colonte for Straw Hats- Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 

Inc. 

FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 



364 Boylston Street Ar 



Near 
lington Street 



Established 1858 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



T.E 



SMART 



I&47T MOTLEY Yjgiij 



G*> 



WALKING 

SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 
ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON, Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., 

Telephone Rich. 820 



Boston 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Recipe 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 
78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E. J. Moneuse, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



F. Capodanno & Sons 

AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Ave. 161 Tremont St. 1311 Walnut St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand FinUhed) 
UNDERWEAR 



SEASONABLE GIFTS 



SPECIAL 
$10.00 






LENGTH 

24 
INCHES 



INDESTRUCTIBLE PARISIAN PEARL NECKLACES 



BAR PIN 
$5.00 

14K Gold Set with Genuine 
Sapphire 



fMtMiW i 



fgBBaHBgg 



1 S y -ll^" 1 ,g-J) ^? i^j) 






BAR PIN 

$10.00 

18K White Gold with Yellow 

Gold Gallery. Set with Cut 

Diamond — a Bargain 



SWEATER SET 
$6.50 

Parisian Pearls set so that they 
will not get loose or come off 



WRIST WATCH 
$50.00 

1 4K Gold Case— Full Jeweled 
Movement 





SUMMER St 

JEWELER) .SI 





Vol. XXXXVIII 



No. 4 



MARCH, 1923 



L 



LASELL LEAVES 



^>ag it tutlly MnmttB 




(EJjarg? arnmttta Boltrttpfc 



LASELL LEAVES 



Girl; 



Protect Your Skin 

Against the Chapping Cold 
Winds of March 

By Using the Proper Creams 
and Soaps 

Our Toilet Goods Section offers many solutions 
to the Spring complexion problem — none more 
pleasant than the LATOUR Creams and Soaps — 
made up to our own specifications and sold only by us. 




Jordan Marsh Company 



Boston 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



A specialty store that is 
ideally fitted to satisfy the 
apparel wants of the college 
girl. Everything here is 
authentic in style and de- 
pendable in service. 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




Linoleum Time Is Here 
This Is Linoleum Place 



EVERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
The same applies to offices and public places in general. 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



tlt TBA 9VA.LlTy 




owns & Fairbanks Co. 



C3^BOSTON^®> 



Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



I^SELL [EAVES 

Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., MARCH, 1923 No. 4 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 





LIST OF OFFICERS 




Business Manager 
JOSEPHINE CURRY 


Editor-in-Chief 
HELEN L. CHAPMAN 


Subscription Manager 
ARLINE ALLSOPP 


Joke Editor 




Athletic Editor 


LOUISA C. VENABLE 


Local Editors 

MARGARET BUNNELL 
MARY M. DeWOLF 


CAROLYN S. COLTON 


Assistant Joke Editor 




Literary Editor 


M. EVELYN SHIDLER 




ELIZABETH BRISTOW 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 

FRONTISPIECE 4 

LITERARY 

The Day's Work M. DeWolf, M. Daugherty, H. Schroer, J. Tong 5 

Prejudice D. Woodruff 10 

EDITORIAL ■ ■ n 

LOCALS 13 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES ■ • • • 17 

LASELL CLUB NOTES 18 

PERSONALS ' 23 

JOKES 27 







HO -I -LA 1923 



ai 



V>^ 




ID 



THE DAY'S WORK 

CREATION 



To sec the thing, to feel the thing 

and forever be trying 
To say the thing, some other way! 

— Mary Shipman Andrews. 



FOREWORD 

It is hard to express all the subtle little 
fancies without which one's thought is not 
complete. The glory of the woods, the fragile 
beauty of the fields seem almost impossible to 
make captive in a poor unpretentious scrap- 
book. 

Here I have placed thoughts that have come 
to me; color effects that have appealed to me, 
so that later, when all that was gold and 
scarlet is bare and deserted, I may feel again 
just a bit of the exotic charm of Indian Sum- 
mer. 



"our heroine did not gather her "American 
Notes." But our gentle readers will keep in 
mind her lamentable limitations and consider 
this one of her other oddities — why, even my 
statue on "The Hill" would realize why and 
blame it on the artist. So you see I must 
mention keeping a note-book if only for the 
peace of mind of my future biographer. 



I FORGOT TO SAY 

■ — that many people who later became famous 
kept common-place note-books in which to 
hoard their choice impressions. It is said 
that Addison gathered three folios of material 
before he was finally satisfied, to publish the 
Spectator; Scott spent one week inquiring 
into one small detail of his story ; others spent 
time brooding in the fields ; and we have 
Hawthorne's "American Note-book" to com- 
plete the publication of his works — it's really 
such a common habit with geniuses (genii?) 
that — well, one never can tell — and 'twould be 
quite scandalous for one's future biographers 
to search vainly and finally have to report that 



NOT BY A REAL ESTATE AGENT 

Auburndale ! One of the most delightful 
townships this inexperienced traveler has ever 
come across, seems to be provided with all 
things that might add to its charm: a large 
city at a convenient distance, where all that 
is best in art, literature, music, and drama is 
offered ; a river on which to canoe in the be- 
witching days of early spring; and devious 
"Woodland Paths" where one may search the 
fragrant arbutus or stroll under the gentle 
rain of autumn leaves. 

It seems an almost perfect setting for a 
home, whether this be a mansion with sloping 
lawns, a tiny, cozy bungalow or a select semi- 
nary for flapper females. 



AN EXTRAVAGANT ENTHUSIAST 
A literary radical is a dangerous type, for 
she possesses the power of making others ex- 
travagantly enthusiastic over her unintelligible 
ravings, her delirious jumble of queer words: 
"They brought me a quilled yellow dahlia, 

Opulent, flaunting. 

Round gold 

Flung out of a pale green stalk 

Round, ripe gold 

Of maturity. 

Meticulously frilled and flaming, 

A fire-ball of proclamation; 

Fecundity decked in staring yellow 

For all the world to see." 



LASELL LEAVES 



Poetry? Poetry! "'tis to laugh" — com- 
pare this stuff with Alfred Noyes "The Burn- 
ing Boughs" : 

The sumach burns in the brake, 

The hills are a furnace of color and mellowing light 

Where junipers flame and flake, 

And the blue-berry dreams like a faint blue smoke 

on the height. 
The pine cones fall below 
On the sweet red-needled earth; 
But milder and sweeter the pipes of the Child-god 

blow, 
In a song of the world's rebirth." 

'Tis a dream ! A nation's prize ! A laureate ! 

How pitifully meagre Miss Lowell's efforts 
seem — how hopelessly inadequate to stir even 
the remotest emotions in one's heart. Her 
appeal seems entirely hectic and her writings 
reach those who can appreciate only the con- 
crete element or those who are carried along 
by the present war-cry dinned in their ears 
that a thing must be the unusual, must satisfy 
the craving of our era of hysteria. 

Our poet's best points are a flare of color 
description and exotic words. 

Free verse is quite an acceptable label for 
her work, for true poetry possesses soul, some- 
thing elusive and far-reaching, which down 
through the ages has been as manna to the 
starved souls of humanity. 

It has been truly said that "Prose is of the 
mortal and poetry of the immortal." 

Amy Lowell's free verse does not possess 
such power ! 

Mary M. DeWolf. 



WIND SPIRITS 

At that time of the year when all of na- 
ture's landscape becomes permeated with the 
rainbow hues of warlike pomp, it seems to be 
the wind's delight to whirl the fast fading 
leaves through the air, wafting them far up 
only to let them fall as suddenly. This wind 
which comes dancing from the northwest is 
artist, humorist, athlete and musician in one, 
and sometimes a regular bully. 

He is different from all other winds, seem- 
ing to come jubilantly from creation's morn- 
ing, making all things appear to be hither- 
ward bound : the fleets of cloud are sent racing- 



across the ever-deepening blue of the sky, 
plunging and driving at breathless speed; 
grass and weeds of the wayside, flowers, trees 
and even the mighty hills, all seem tugging at 
their anchors. 

Destroyers and preservers, too ! If we look 
at a garden, late, in the summer, which has 
been left uncared for awhile, we may see 
strange little wild flowers growing among the 
carefully cultivated clusters of color. Does it 
not seem strange that they should be there? 
Without wind nature's multitudes of seeds 
could never be scattered, a condition which 
would mean that vegetation would all be killed 
in the struggle for existence. 

Remembering all of the helpful features of 
the dancing air spirits, it seems hard to be- 
lieve that they are the same which in a fren- 
zied temper come in whirling cyclones to tear 
down and demolish all in their path. At such 
times they are without mercy : their former 
playfellows are torn up from the earth, bat- 
tered and broken ; the once merry waters 
churned and thrashed into mad thundering 
waves which destroy all within their reach. 
Everything must bend to that wild unquelled 
force sent from shoreless realms only to return 
again after taking its toll of things on earth. 

With the blue vault of sky as its playroom, 
And all things of the earth to amuse it, 

The wind of so many and various moods 
Must surely forever find pleasure. 

A master hand must wield the brush 
That ripples the boundless waters ; 

A musician of dexterity, as yet unknown, 
Make the boughs of the forest his harp. 

■ — Dorothy Redman. 



TO A YELLOW DAFFODIL 

Oh, golden pioneer of spring ! 

Oh, quaint yellow daffodil ! 

Your shining rays 

Beam across my garden 

And gently waken 

Your more slowly leafing sisters ; 

Oh, little Lady Daffodil ! 

Do you wear 

Your brilliant hood and collar 

With your bright green mantle 

Because you are happy 

That spring is here? 

You are the golden cup and plate 

God sends to earth 

From which the fairies feast. 

— Matilda Jane Daugherty. 



LASELL LEAVES 



7 



"WHERE THE PURPLE SPACES BEGIN" 

We wonder what miracles music will per- 
form when it is free of its four walls ! — and 
when, to quote Niehardt, a poet of the open, "It 
is robed in the vast and lonesome purple spaces 
like a King!" 

The realizing sense of this came to us 
through these remarkable new out-of-door 
places, which, for lack of better name, are 
grouped today under the somewhat contradic- 
tory heading of "open-air auditoriums." 

These theatres are capable of creating more 
real and lasting pleasure than almost anything 
else that could be named : for with the green 
grass as a stage, trees or foliage for a back- 
ground, the blue sky for a roof, and within 
view of mountain and wave, one can easily 
see the inspiration added to the usual environ- 
ment of concert halls and theatres. It can 
give equal enjoyment to the specialized dra- 
matic group, the school, the college or the 
community. 

In this new "Golden Age" of sport and 
open-air amusements, we find new vistas open- 
ing for musical development as perhaps never 
before in the history of musical art in any 
land. But what may grow out of it is far 
more important than what has been accom- 
plished. 

Its power of stimulating worth-while activi- 
ties is simply incalculable, and what is visioned 
speaks in no uncertain voice for the enterprise 
of art-loving Americans. 

As to another phase, it has been said that 
foot-ball is one of the outstanding features of 
this new age. America's college record is 
passing that of the Roman Empire in the num- 
ber and size of amphitheatres built for games 
and athletic contests. The use of these modern 
colosseums for other than foot-ball games is 
urgently recommended, but it is admitted that 
without the "pomp and pageantry" — and thrill 
of foot-ball — the money would never have 
made its appearance to build these huge bowls. 

He who thrills at reading of a gladiatorial 
contest can get the same thrill, experience the 
same "mob psychology," by attending a foot- 
ball game in the Yale Bowl, in the new stadium 



at Ohio State University at Columbus, or one 
of the numerous smaller American structures. 

Whether it has been wise to put up these 
great structures so that thousands may view 
athletic contests, is a question frequently de- 
bated. .Some think that stimulation of interest 
to too high a point diverts the minds of the stu- 
dents from their books, often affecting those 
who most need the academic training; others 
view this interest as only a part of a desirable 
college life. 

Most of the educators who have spoken their 
thoughts on these subjects recently have ex- 
pressed the opinion that great playing fields are 
as necessary as the laboratories of Chemistry 
and Physics. 

There are also movements in several large 
cities for the erection of stadiums with seating 
capacity which will surpass any of the college 
amphitheatres. Los Angeles has the most in- 
teresting plan of all and is out for the Olympic 



games in 1932. 



Let us look at some of the auditoriums 
which have served as a great contribution to 
civic or national events. One of the most im- 
portant of these is the Arlington Amphitheatre 
at Washington, a classic marble memorial to 
the heroes of the nation. At the highest part 
of Arlington Cemetery this auditorium looks 
out upon the Capitol and executive building, 
the Washington Monument and the Potomac 
River. It is here that the President of the 
United States yearly addresses his people at 
the Memorial Day services. 

Another unusually interesting stadium, de- 
scribed as "An Epic of the West" is the 
Tacoma Stadium which is one of the show 
places of the State of Washington. The site of 
this stadium is a deep and densely wooded 
gulch known as "Old Woman's Gulch", so- 
called by the early pioneers because of a lone- 
ly old woman who lived there in a hut. It 
is this gulch which has been transformed into 
one of the most remarkably situated stadiums 
in the world, overlooking an expanse of Puget 
Sound with its blue waters and heavily tim- 
bered islands and shores. In the distance to 
the south can be seen the Cascade Range where 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mount Ranier towers majestically, and on the 
north the lofty peaks of the Olympics. 

It would be impossible to note the other 
countless interesting things about this stadium 
building era which is now sweeping the coun- 
try — but we may be assured of a still greater 
achievement in the near future. 

Helen Schroer. 



AN INTREPID PIONEER 

In the days of long ago, frequently desig- 
nated as "the good old days", when the wool of 
the woolly West had not been bobbed, my in- 
trepid grandmother, a young widow, turned 
her steps toward the rude but promising fron- 
tier. I don't know whether in those days they 
had Pullmans on that curious little train that 
scrambled hysterically into the Wisconsin back- 
woods. At any rate, since Grandmother was 
struggling with poverty then — indeed all hero- 
ines should be poor, and lovely — she probably 
rolled triumphantly into Millet's Point (along 
with the usual assortment of bananas and 
babies) with her bundles and her optimism all 
jammed into a dinky, dirty, day coach. 

She wandered some time in the strange, 
rather forlorn little town looking for a habita- 
tion — a mere shack — any place where she 
might hang her hat during the approaching 
winter. But evidently it was not a flourishing 
climate for houses, for they were as scarce 
as hen's teeth. At last, as she was on the verge 
of despair, a real estate agent made her a 
rather strange offer. He showed her an im- 
mense old building in a lonely section of woods 
outside the village, which, though well built and 
well cared for, had apparently not been used 
for some time. The astounding feature was 
the low rent. The place was offered for al- 
most nothing. Grandmother's shrewd mind 
pondered on this, for she realized there must be 
some reason for such a bargain in rentals. But 
after she had turned over all the good and bad 
points of the place, she decided that, as far 
as she could determine, the good, ones far out- 
weighed the bad. 

She was not long, however, in discovering 



why she had received such favorable terms. 
The house, so rumor ran, as did the tenants, 
too, was haunted. Not that anyone had seen 
a family skeleton emerge from its closet and 
stalk horribly through the halls in the shivery 
hours of early morning, but gossip had it that 
mysterious noises had been heard by reliable 
witnesses ; furthermore, had not the last few 
occupants moved out in short order without 
waiting for the expiration of the lease? The 
folks thereabouts shook their heads in a know- 
ing way and said significantly, "Well, you 
know that Smith woman who tried it. She 
said 'she didn't believe in spirits ! All non- 
sense !' But you know how she — well, of 
course, Mrs. Beardsley," — this to Grand- 
mother — "of course, we don't want to alarm 
you unnecessarily but — " another dubious 
headshake. 

Upon the following circumstances, however, 
they all agreed. The restless spirit took rather 
a malicious delight in teasing the inmates of the 
house. Upon a dark and dreary night, after 
the children had been put to bed, there would 
come a tickling, delicate swish across the win- 
dow pane, not alarming at first, but weird 
enough to arouse curiosity. When the window 
was opened there was nothing to be seen, nor 
was there any branch of a shrub or tree near. 
Again and again, however, the invisible hand 
of the ghost would glide across the pane. It be- 
came too persistent; the tenants reached a 
point at which they could endure it no longer ; 
then they moved away. 

Now Grandmother was a hard-headed, prac- 
tical woman. She was trying to keep the wolf 
from the door and the spook might just as well 
be the watch-dog. 

Winter settled down quickly and fiercely on 
Millet's Point, but Grandmother had settled 
even more quickly. Thus on a bitter, windless 
evening in the dead of the winter season, with 
the moon at its fullest and brightest, she was 
sewing cozily before the fire. She seemed to 
be putting prosaic buttonholes in small dresses, 
but really, thread by thread, she was weaving 
together a gorgeous magic cloak — its pattern, 
her dreams and desires, fragile, beautiful. It 



LASELL LEAVES 



was rent abruptly by the much heralded 
specter. From out of nowhere in that frozen 
stillness, a shadowy touch swept across the 
window. The hairs on Grandmother's head 
rose straight with horror. But Grandmother 
had no elaborate marcel so that occasioned no 
dismay. 

"Who's there ?" she demanded in what was 
intended to be a determined voice. Her words 
quavered oddly in the silence. "Who's there ?" 
she repeated more firmly. 

Gathering the remnants of her fast ebbing 
courage, she flung open the window and rudely 
challenged the peace of the night. Somewhat 
abashed to discover the serene brilliance of the 
moonlight dreaming over the sleeping forest 
and feeling that her nerves must have betrayed 
her, she turned back. From the wall, however, 
she took down the old family shot-gun and 
made sure there was a charge within its yawn- 
ing throat ; then relieved, she sat down to toast 
before the fire. 

Again came the ghastly swish across the win- 
dow pane, so faint as to seem merely a sug- 
gestion, yet so definite that it froze logic and 
compelled belief. Pretense went down under 
the strain. All of Grandmother's faculties 
were concentrated on the dull square of moon- 
washed window. The blunderbuss slowly went 
up to her shoulder and focussed its grim snout 
in that direction. Grandmother's straining eyes 
caught the approaching wisp of blackness be- 
fore there came again the startling counter- 
sign of the midnight visitor, and, on the in- 
stant, the gun roared. There was a tinkle of 
broken glass ; through the sombre trees the 
echoes rocked with improper hilarity. Stag- 
gering from the back-kick of the heavy fire- 
arm, Grandmother groped through the sting- 
ing smoke to the window. By the flickering 
yellow circle of the candle hastily lit, she saw 
clearly something small and black fluttering 
on the floor. "A bat !" She gave a queer 
little cry of only too evident relief, which, 
translated from the feminine means, "Well, 
I'll be hanged !" 

Closer inspection revealed that Grand- 
mother's intentions were better than her aim, 



for the books upon the shelf by the window, 
as well as the ledge itself, had a generous pep- 
pering of shot. Evidently the prowler had re- 
ceived but a stray grain in the wing, and hence 
was unable to fly, but was not seriously hurt. 

Grandmother rose the next morning feeling 
quite the hardy pioneer, though to be sure she 
did admit there was a technical difference be- 
tween beating off bloodthirsty redskins and 
popping off the blunderbuss at a bat coming 
home to roost. For Grandmother had discov- 
ered, that there was a whole family of bats 
lodged in a cubby-hole under the roof, particu- 
larly desirable because of the unusual way in 
which the house was built. This latter cir- 
cumstance made it impossible for the mem- 
bers of the household to enter or leave their 
front door without brushing against the win- 
dow. 

And while you may argue that bats are 
rather a morbid decoration for a house, it is 
certainly true that they trimmed the rents a 
bit and thus by the next spring Grandmother 
had. saved enough for a new bonnet. 

/. Tong. 



WANDERINGS 



Though I may wander all my life, 
Journeying this old world o'er, 
Exhausting all its joy and strife, 
Seeing all it holds in store ; 
Seeking forever regions serene, 
From eternal snows to burning sand, 
Shall I ever find the place of my dreams 
Search as I may through every land? 

Moonlit shores, shadowy lanes, 
Golden, happy, lazy days, 
Lonesome, empty, barren plains, 
Withering, blistering, in the sun's rays; 

Dizzy heights, snow capped peaks, 
Rosy dawns and murmuring trees, 
Wind swept rocky cliffs, that jut 
Over wild rebellious seas. 

With these my heart's contented never, 
However far I roam ; 
For though I seek and search forever 
The happiest spot is home. 

— Mary . Ann Miller '23. 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



A PREJUDICE 

One year when we had been under very 
heavy expenses we decided to take a cheap va- 
cation. After reading innumerable ads and 
railroad resort books, we took the advice of an 
acquaintance, settling" on the place recom- 
mended by her. 

After arriving at the station, the name of 
which was Peaceful Valley, and waiting near- 
ly three quarters of an hour, a high class fliv- 
ver came for us. We rode about ten miles to 
our summer resort over worse than typical 
country roads, dusty, narrow and uncomfort- 
ably bumpy. The place looked all right as we 
approached it, but when we arrived, we found 
a gathering of men sitting on the porch, some 
coatless, with shirt sleeves rolled up and others 
shoeless. Hens, the edible kind, geese and 
ducks were walking about. We decided that 
this was not the place for us, so we walked 
about three miles to the nearest village and 
asked for information that would lead us to a 
desirable resort. 

We learned that there was a suitable hotel 
at Minnewacha, so hiring a horse and wagon 
for nine dollars we went back to the station 
for our trunks, and for ten dollars more got 
back to Poughkeepsie. Here we spent two dol- 
lars to get across the river and three dollars 
more to get to Newpaltz by trolley. No one 
would drive us farther so we engaged a room, 
the only available one in the town, which 
turned out to be directly over a bar room. 

The night there was indescribable. There 
was one bed which two of us occupied ; the 
third slept on a horse hair sofa which was 
worse than prickly heat. The bar room did 
not close until two and was open again at two- 
thirty. It cost us five dollars for these accom- 
modations and by six o'clock in the morning we 
gave it up as a bad job. We hired a horse and 
wagon for fourteen dollars and. drove up the 
mountain to the Hotel. But when we reached 
our destination it was worth all the trouble ! 



However, I am prejudiced against economizing 
on necessities and surely vacations are necessi- 
ties. 

Doris Woodruff. 



REFLECTIONS ON CHOOSING A VOCATION 



Sitting by the open fireside on a cold and wintry day, 
I muse, upon the years past — spent in much the usual 

way. 
I wonder if before my life upon this earth is o'er, 
My name will be exalted and to greater heights I'll 

soar. 
Well, I suppose I must start sometime and it might 

as well be now ; 
So I'll put away all youthful joys, and to ambition 

bow, 
A sculptress, artist, dancer — whatever shall I be? 
Surely not a poetess, as by these lines you'll see ! 
As a writer of short stories I might set the world 

aflame — 
Thus I reckoned, but unto my mind no inspiration 

came. 
That place, too, must be abandoned, and that star will 

glimmer not, 
For however hard I work my brain I cannot find a 

plot. 
The musician or the actress goes her fascinating way, 
Still — each works so long and toils so hard, perhaps 

it does not pay. 
"Ambition should be made of sterner stuff" the poets 

say, 
So I think I'll look around a bit, and not decide to- 
day ! 

Helen Reardan, '23. 



THE BETTER WAY 



When I begin to feel that school's a bore, 

And all the world is simply meant for play; 

That I should like to study never more, 

And only drift or idly spend the day ; 

Wishing of themes that there were none on earth, 

And that of school books all, there'd be a sudden 

dearth, — 
'Tis then I fondly think of Lasell, with its girls, 
Its sports, its teachers kind, its spirit true; 
And then I realize the hours there, like pearls, 
Should be well prized, for they are all too few; 
How all through life it is the better way 
To make of toilsome work but fruitful play. 

D. Pearson. 








tfortit 



3^ ^ 



LASELL'S NEIGHBORS 

Lasell has indeed been blessed in being sur- 
rounded with "good, kind neighbors." Years 
ago one of our loyal, nearby trustees was Mr. 
George Eager. His attractive home is still 
open and occupied by his daughter, Miss Mabel 
T. Eager, whose friendship we greatly appre- 
ciate. Dear Dr. Peloubet, of blessed memory, 
was for so many years just across the way. 
His widow and daughters are still in residence 
and keep the "home fire burning" in that his- 
toric library to the joy of the girls at Bragdon, 
some of whom, through the winter days, can 
catch a glimpse of the fire on that hospitable 
hearth in the Peloubet home. Not long ago, 
through the courtesy and friendly thoughtful- 
ness of Mr. Frederick J. Ranlett, who settled 
the estate of the late Mrs. Nathaniel Dike, an- 
other of Lasell's kind neighbors, our school 
received a valuable gift of books. The collec- 
tion of one hundred and twenty-five volumes 
included Chambers' Encyclopedia and a num- 
ber of beautifully illustrated works on travel 
and fiction. / Lasell takes this opportunity of 
expressing her deep appreciation of this gen- 
erous gift to our school library. 



CREW 

By the time this issue is out spring will be 
upon us and with it that ideal of athletic 
achievement, "Making Crew". To you girls 
who have never experienced the thrill of a 
Lasell River Day let me urge upon you a pre- 
conceived thrill that will send you out in num- 
bers for the try-outs. There are many attrac- 
tions besides the honor attached to making 
crew, for afternoons spent on the river in 
training, and in picnic suppers on the bank are 
all part of it and greater sport there never 
was. Let the invigorating air wake you up 
from the winter hibernation and prevent that 
slump caused by spring-fever, the enemy of 
good marks and wakeful days. When the 
crew gets into line and it is "Do or Die" for 
the goal, there comes the greatest thrill pos- 
sible for the heart of a Lasell girl. 




THE BOOKS PRESENTED BY MR. RANDLETT 



FRIENDSHIP 

Now that the days are slipping away from 
us, and Commencement and the time of part- 
ing with those at Lasell draws near, let us not 
lose one opportunity to add another friend to 
our lists. After we have forgotten many 
things learned in the class-room real friend- 
ships will be lasting memories. Let us choose 
those orirls for friends with whom we have 

o 

ideals and pleasures in common. Let the in- 
fluence of those with whom we are intimately 
associated be such that it will be uplifting and 
as a result of this experience we shall find 
ourselves better and finer. Friendship is the 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



greatest factor in the life of all boarding- 
schools girls, but it is possible only when each 
contributes her share of love and loyalty. Let 
us be sincere and frank with our friends and 
let us also remember that unkind criticism is 
the most cruel foe to friendship, and be kindly 
in our judgment of one another. Let us also 
guard against limiting our friendships to a sin- 
gle person or group. By seeking the com- 
panionship of girls from every class and by 
showing a warm friendliness and sympathy to 
those with whom we come in contact we shall 
be living up to the ideal expressed in the fol- 
lowing lines : 

"Let me live in a house by the side of the road, 
Where the race of men go by, — 
The men who are good, the men who are bad, 
As good and as bad as I. 
I would not sit in the scorner's seat; 
Nor hurl the cynic's ban — 

Let me live in the house by the side of the road— 
And be a friend to man." 



WORLD CURRENTS 

The world today is not a static world. More 
than ever before in the history of mankind 
progress is being made in unprecedented., 
gigantic strides. Science and invention are 
moving so fast that we must often hold our 
breath in the attempt to keep pace or to "catch 
up" with them. Our modern world is not a 
narrow, restricted sphere — the limited horizon 
of centuries ago. Modern literature of every 
description, commerce, political, economic, so- 
cial and spiritual enterprise are bringing the 
whole world to our doors and are weaving 
every part of the globe into one great fellow- 
ship, Internationalism is the key-word in every 
realm of thought and action. 

Our heritage down through the centuries is 
one for which we should be extremely grateful 
and to which we owe most of our present-day 
achievement. Our present development is due 
to and dependent upon our ancestry. Wash- 



ington, the Father of our Country, less than a 
century and. a half ago, set these United States 
on a footing which was bound to lead to ulti- 
mate success and to continued progress. His 
sterling character and fine idealism, genuine 
earnestness, vision and statesmanship, have 
been a beacon light in our country's historical 
and political development. Abraham Lincoln 
has been called "A man for the ages". Be- 
cause he developed the powers within him to 
the best of his ability, stood for and lived a 
life of high idealism, maintained and helped to 
fulfil the cause of justice, he is a growing in- 
spiration and pattern for all mankind. 

If we consider the advance made during 
the century between the lives of these two great 
patriots and then again between the time of 
Lincoln and. our present day, less than a half 
century, what may we not anticipate for the 
generations to come ? Consider that today the 
excavated tomb of Tutankhamen at Luxor 
is lighted by two thousand candle power lamps, 
while in Washington's day, candle light was a 
luxury, and three thousand, years ago King 
Tutankhamen had no light of any kind in his 
dark underground passage ! 

History records no limit to man's genius and 
ability. But are we keeping pace spiritually? 
Are not these very inventions running ahead 
of us so that they are overcoming us, instead 
of our overcoming them? If we would be a 
part of this modern, moving, changing world 
we can do nothing less than to join the ever- 
moving, jostling crowd. We cannot sit back 
complacently if we are at all interested in the 
bigger things of life. But we must maintain 
poise and a balanced idea of the ultimate aim 
of all progress in the world, otherwise we are 
lost. Let us as Lasell girls, as the coming 
participants in affairs national and interna- 
tional, by personal interest and study and by 
the power that will be ours through legislation, 
be ready to take our places in this new day. 

/. Markert 




Stanley High led the Vespers of Jan. 28 
and talked to us very earnestly of our duty as 
fellow-students toward making the world a 
better place to live in. He told us many unique 
experiences of his European tour last summer. 
We hear he is soon to go to China and for our 
sakes hope it is not true, for we certainly look 
forward to his vesper service each year. 

At Vespers, Feb. 4, Rev. George Parker of 
Newton Center spoke to us of the joy that is 
inseparably linked with God. 

The girls who attended the morning service 
the Sunday of Jan. 21, in Dr. Park's Church 
will remember Mr. Parker's "Turn to the 
Right" sermon which he preached in Dr. 
Park's absence. 

Our Vesper service of Feb. 18 was led by 
Professor Bates of Tufts College, who spoke 
to us of the Dynasties of Ancient Egypt and 
described the wonders of the Pharaohs' temples 
and tombs, especially that of Tutankhamen 
recently opened near Luxor. Professor Bates 
had lantern slides for illustration and after the 
lecture invited us to the stage where he showed 
us some sacred scarabs and. prayer-images that 
were buried with royal mummies in their 
sunken tombs. 

The Christian Endeavor meetings have been 
well attended : Kay Lalley, Olga Hammell, 
Edith Clendenin and Lovina Smith, "the guid- 
ing spirits", have helped to make these even- 



ing gatherings most enjoyable and. helpful. 

Instead of the regular meeting of the "Cercle 
Francais" in the parlor at Bragdon, a buffet 
supper was held in the Green Room at Wood- 
land Park on Thursday afternoon, January 
twenty-fifth at five o'clock. Mrs. Winslow 
was the guest of the "Cercle". 

After the supper the president being absent, 
the vice-president, Phyllis Hessin, called the 
meeting to order. Esther Adams was elected 
assistant secretary. It was decided that the 
"Cercle" would give a concert for the benefit 
of the endowment fund sometime during April. 
A committee was appointed to make arrange- 
ments for the concert. 

The "Cercle" adjourned at quarter past 
seven after a very pleasant meeting. 

Two Senior Conversation Classes have been 
held this year ; at the first, President Pinkie 
Puckett presided, and at the second, Marjorie 
Lowell. They all say it wasn't half as "scarey" 
as it is supposed, to be: they actually enjoyed 
themselves, even though they had to talk. 

The Sophomores treated the Seniors to a 
Valentine party at Woodland, Saturday night, 
Feb. 17. The decorations were mostly valen- 
tines; a very large one joining with streamers 
the banners of the sister classes. There was 
dancing to the music of an "absolutely divine 
orchestra" ; refreshments were served, and 
everybody had a "simply gorgeous" time. 



* 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



Miss Potter's lecture of Jan. 27 was on 
"Courtesy". She kept us all interested by her 
amusing stories and incidentally gave us good 
advice on what to do, and when, where, and 
how to do it. 

Mr. Towne spoke to us Feb. 17, on Psy- 
chology. The recent discoveries which he dis- 
cussed about glands affecting one's appearance 
and character seem almost miraculous. 

"The Causes of the World-War", Mrs. 
Meade chose as her topic for our Feb. 3 lec- 
ture. Her knowledge of pre-war intrigues is 
remarkable and her talk was exceptionally 
straightforward and broad-minded. 

Instead of the usual Vespers, Feb. .11, each 
house had its own service. At Bragdon the 
meeting was held, in Miss Potter's room and 
was similar to her lights-out prayer-meetings 
that are always such an inspiration toward 
starting the week right. 



HONOR CREDITS 

Congratulations ! well deserved for those 
among us who have distinguished themselves 
by receiving honor credits and honorable men- 
tion at the end of this first term. 

The following names appear upon the Honor 
Roll: 

Elizabeth Mitchell and Sylvia Starr received 
three credits; Olga Hammell, Phyllis Hessin, 
Ruth Plopkins, Hazel Small, Louise Strauss, 
Anita Swope, Marguerite Virkler, received 
two credits; Ida Markert, Elizabeth Nowell, 
Adrienne Smith, Isabel Varney and Madeline 
Winslow were given honorable mention. 

After the announcement was made "teeth 
gritted" in determination and new resolves for 
work and accomplishment were made. 



THE ICE CARNIVAL 

It was time to get dressed for the Ice Carni- 
val which we had been anticipating all the 
week. 

"What are you going to wear?" asked my 
chum. 

"Well, I don't know", I answered. "The 
only things of winter carnival style I own are 



a pair of woollen stockings, so I'll have to 
trust to the generosity of my friends." I was 
soon fitted out in knickers and sweaters, so 
many of the latter that I resembled anything 
but my usual self. Upon poking our noses out 
into the cold, night, we found groups of shiver- 
ing girls, standing first on one foot and then 
on another. "Where are the sleds? They're 
not here and the gym is locked so we can't get 
in." 

It rather looked "up to us" to do something, 
so we went around to one of the cellar win- 
dows and opening it, crawled in. From the 
spirit of altruism or adventure, I offered to 
go first and let myself down into — the coal 
bin ; luckily it was not very full and after 
falling around over the coal we emerged. Now 
neither of us is particularly timid or mid- Vic- 
torian, but you try walking around in a strange 
pitch-dark cellar some night, where you think 
you have a clear way before you and you 
suddenly come into painful contact with an 
ash barrel you were evidently endeavoring to 
walk through ! It rather destroys self-con- 
fidence ; but we reached the stairs, went up to 
the gym and took out the sleds. Then the fun 
began. 

One certainly could not wish for a prettier 
scene. The moon was shining in all its bril- 
liancy on the two slides stretching like two 
silvery paths before us, leading downward and 
then across the snow-sparkling field into the 
darkness beyond. We needed, no second invi- 
tation to pay five cents and try this wonderful 
slide. 

It is one thing to be poetic standing at the 
top of the hill and an altogether different thing 
to be on your stomach with a sled, under you, 
flying at an unthinkable speed down the hill. 
And the bump ! That is one thing many a 
girl will remember in after years. When we 
struck it I had the feeling of floating about the 
sled and then was brought to sudden disil- 
lusionment. Whack! I was again on hard 
wood, and the rest of the slide was covered in 
unconsciousness for me. When I walked up, 
my knees were knocking- together and it wasn't 
from cold alone. 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



15 



Having lived through the first slide, we tried 
a second. This time the bump did not seem 
half so horrible and we had time to think of the 
beauty of the night, the cold biting wind rush- 
ing past our faces as we cut through the air. 
Upon reaching the end of the slide we lay still 
on our backs for a moment, looking up at the 
myriads of stars shining over us which had 
turned a familiar scene into a fairyland. 
Starting our upward, climb, the snow crunching 
and squeaking under our feet, the shrieks and 
laughter of the unlucky who overturned and 
the triumphant yell of those who passed the 
bump without an accident added color to the 
black and white of the night. 

The music drifted out from the gym where 
those not interested in the outside sport were 
dancing, where also the tired and cold "coaster 
enthusiasts" were drinking coffee and gobbling 
doughnuts and hot-dogs preparatory to further 
sliding and skiing. The hour grew late and 
our pocket-books lighter, yet weary and aching 
as we were, the lure of the slide was too much 
for resistance and we were again on our flying 
downward way. 

All good things must have an end and. the 
Ice Carnival is only a memory now, although 
for a week many were reminded of it unpleas- 
antly if they moved without deliberation. 



THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 

Even though we were forced to arise an 
hour or so before the rising bell Friday morn- 
ing, Feb. 9, no one seemed to mind, and an en- 
thusiastic crowd of fifty girls took possession 
of their chartered car from the North Station 
in Boston. The five hours spent on the train 
until we reached our destination fairly whizzed 
by. 

Mr. Bassett, more commonly known as 
"Daddy" Bassett, joined the party at Haver- 
hill. He was full of fun and made us realize 
all the more just what was in store for us. 

About two o'clock we arrived at Intervale, 
a small New Hampshire village, surrounded by 
majestic, snow-covered mountains, many of 
which were beautifully crowned, with tall 
pines. 



One may be sure that no time was wasted 
in donning our knickers and sweaters and get- 
ting ready for a jolly good time in the snow. 
Daddy Bassett had something planned for 
nearly every morning, afternoon, and evening, 
so our time was well occupied. A trailing party 
was organized the first afternoon, and oh, the 
fun we had falling off and pushing others off 
into the snow ! After the strenuous exercise of 
running a goodly part of the way behind the 
toboggans one can imagine the keenness of our 
appetites when we returned. 

Saturday morning we went on a sleigh ride 
to Jackson, a little village eight miles from the 
hotel. All bundled in winter flannels, heavy 
sweaters, coats, scarfs, and anything else which 
might keep us warm, we started down the road 
singing merrily. We had not gone far when 
we decided that it would be great fun to jump 
off the sides of the sleighs into the snow banks 
as we passed them, after which we had to run 
to catch up with the sleighs. Miss Farrar and 
Miss Seely seemed to get just as much enjoy- 
ment out of this unnecessary exercise as the 
rest of us. 

In the evening, we had another sleigh ride to 
North Conway, a neighboring village, where 
we went to a real moving picture show. An- 
other joy of the White Mountain trip was that 
there were no "lights-out" bells, and we surely 
took advantage of our freedom by not settling 
down until quite late at night. 

Sunday we hiked over to Cathedral Woods 
at the base of Mount Surprise, which was about 
three-quarters of a mile from the hotel. Here 
we found an abundance of food and four large 
fires all prepared for us. The fires and tables 
were arranged in a large circular space, sur- 
rounded by a wall of snow some three or four 
feet high. There was even a decorated door- 
way through which we entered. After our lit- 
tle jaunt through the snow we were hungry as 
bears. Having consumed a vast amount of 
food some of us felt equal to climbing Mount 
Surprise on snow shoes. This may not sound 
very difficult, but I can assure you that most 
of us were glad to see the top and had it not 
been for the guide I fear that several of our 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



party would not have reached the top as easily 
as they did. The wonderful view of the sur- 
rounding mountains and valleys fully repaid 
us for the strenuous climb. We stopped on the 
top for only a few minutes to rest and take 
pictures, and then, as enthusiastically as ever 
we started down the other side. The hike back, 
perhaps, was more interesting because we came 
upon a toboggan and ski slide which was al- 
most the full length of the side of the moun- 
tain. Needless to say we had some thrilling 
rides. 

Sunday night after supper we all gathered 
in a large room of the hotel and witnessed a 
mock wedding ; others added, to the entertain- 
ment by playing and singing. This lasted for 
an hour or so and then we were all out for our 
last toboggan slides. 

We left for home Monday morning at seven 
o'clock. The party was in a somewhat differ- 
ent spirit when they arose at quarter before 
six that morning than on the previous Friday 
morning. However, the beautiful sunrise was 
a redeeming feature and even though we were 
a bit drowsy we could not help admiring it. 

In spite of the many falls and bumps we re- 
ceived due to our inexperience on skis and 
snowshoes, we reached school whole and 
hearty about three o'clock, filled with enthusi- 
asm for the White Mountain trip of 1923. 



will transport you into flagrant expenditures 
and extravagances we hope ; and the music 
will take you to Mandalay or San Francisco ; 
and the food ! — not to the nurse, but back for 
more — 



THE JAPANESE TEA 

For money for Lasell, and also for fun, the 
Seniors are giving on March 3rd a Japanese 
Tea to which the whole school is cordially in- 
vited. Of course the underlying cause is the 
endowment fund which has as a cherished 
goal $1000 in cash for the gift of the Senior 
Class to their Alma Mater, representing gen- 
erosity on the part of the whole school and 
work and good will on the part of the Seniors. 

And now comes the play part — introduced 
by food as the name suggests and followed by 
dancing as the hope expressed. Eve heard it 
whispered that the waitresses are to be im- 
ported, not from Vantine's, but a place equally 
as oriental. Wistaria and cherry blossoms 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Out of 230 girls in this school 72 experi- 
enced players and 42 inexperienced came out 
for basketball at the beginning of the season. 
The spirit is fine, girls, keep it up ! 

We have played three games already : two 
with Chandler and one with Posse Normal. 
We have lost all three games in score, but not 
in spirit. As we have more to play we may 
win yet. 





Team 




Sub. 


Mitchell, 


Capt. 


LF 


Cummings 


Colton 




RF 


Stryker 


Clendenir 


L 


C 


Neal 


Robbins 




SC 


Cushing 


Parry 




RG 


MacDavitt 


Mclntire 




LG 


Redman 




Ethel Cole in the dress worn by Mrs. Flint at Lasell in 1861 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 




Standing, left to right : Irma Conant, Christine Chamberlin, Marjone Jagger, Marguerite 

Robinson, Eleanor Hibbard, Catherine Beecher, Hortense Areson, Frances Royce. 

Sitting : Ella Richards, Elizabeth Irish, (dress worn by her great, great grandmother) 

Barbara Cashing 



THE WASHINGTON BIRTHDAY PARTY 

"Oh, you're just darling ! Hurry up ! 
There's the warning bell ! Where is that 
powder can? Yes, dump it all on. How can 
I ever make this puff stay on? Talk about 
the common sense of our great-grandmothers 
- — I shall simply expire from the tightness of 
this bodice. Say, could you tell this overskirt 
was made out of our cretonne curtains? Isn't 
she a dream in those pantalettes ? Some one'll 
be minus a pair of pajamas to-night. Isn't 
Ruth just great as George? You know her 
Mother sent the costume on from Chicago, — 
and Ethel's dress — isn't it too' darling for 



Such a sumptuous dinner ! even to cherry- 
tree pastry, log, hatchet and all. 

Now the spacious halls fill with the largest 
and most courtly assembly in the history of 
Lasell. Now comes the excitement of the 
grand march forming in sections. To the 
strains of martial music it moves, led by Dr. 
and Mrs. Winslow, followed by the faculty, 
Lasell girls and girls of Junior school. The 
spacious rooms are a fine setting for the wind- 
ing, picturesque procession, after which the 
stately minuet is danced with courtly grace 
by a group of Junior girls. 

Then follows an evening of dancing, until 



words— was worn here by Hannah Harding to repeated encores, the strains of the last 



Flint in 1861, when she was a Lasell 
girl. Well, did you ever see such an adorable 
bonnet? There's the bell! Yes, I'm coming!" 
Chatter ! buzz ! squeal ! and as the strains of 
the orchestra grow audible the stairways of 
Main and Woodland blaze with a glory of 
color as there descend scarlet coated Con- 
tinentals, quaint colonial dames, dignified 



dance melt away and. the Washington dinner 
and dance of 1923 are now added tradition in 
the history of Lasell. 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 



Winter sports have been our greatest feature 
for the past month. So much snow has long 



Georges and Marthas, quaint little maids, a since spoiled our skating, but we have never 
bride in ivory satin, a mischievous Topsy, yes before had such a prolonged, coasting and ski- 



— and a real Indian brave in all his war paint. 



ing season. 



We can all ski now down to our 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Baby". We feel more Norwegian than the 
Norwegians ! Our Saturday evening parties 
have all been coasting parties, completed by a 
marshmallow roast in front of the big fire- 
place in the living room. 

Feb. 3. We enjoyed a "movie" at the Au- 
burndale Men's Club — with Miss Williams as 
chaperon. "Movies" are a great treat at 
Woodland Park ! 

Feb. 4. The 9th Grade with Miss Hemmeon, 
heard Rabbi Wise of New York in Boston at 
the Community Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Towne and Mrs. Furlong 
were our guests at tea in the living-room. Af- 
ter tea, we turned down the lights and grouped 
ourselves around the fireplace in camp-fire 
style while Mr. Towne related the thrilling 
story of his being lost while hunting in the 
Maine woods. 

Feb. 5. The Junior High School teachers 
attended the New England Alumnae luncheon 
at Bragdon Hall. 

Feb. 13. Accompanied by Prof. Hills all the 
music pupils of Woodland Park attended the 
Young People's Symphony Concert in Boston. 

Feb. 14. There never were so many valen- 
times in one place at one time as came out of 
our big Valentine box on Feb. 14 ! Everyone 
was generously remembered, and there were 
fifty happy children. 

Feb. 17. The 9th grade girls heard Edward 
Howard Griggs lecture on "Socrates" in Tre- 
mont Temple. 

The younger girls attended the Girl Scouts' 
entertainment at the Auburndale Men's Club. 

Feb. 22. Mrs. McDonald and her daughter, 
Gwendolyn, attended the reception to the 
Canadian Club by Gov. Cox. 

In the evening the Junior school joined 
Lasell in celebrating Washington's Birthday. 
Everyone was in colonial costume and all took 
a keen interest in what is generally conceded to 
be the prettiest and jolliest party of the year. 
After the grand march, led. by Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow, eight girls of the Junior School 
danced the Minuet. A picture was taken of 
one of the figures. Then general dancing — 
Faculty and children — ladies of all periods. 



Notable among the costumes was one which 
had been worn by a Lasell girl while at school 
in 1861. 

Feb. 12 and. 22. Our patriotic holidays of 
the month. On the morning of Feb. 12, Dr. 
Winslow visited us at chapel. He showed 
some pictures of the Lincoln Memorial and 
described the simple beauty of the Nation's 
tribute to our great President. 

Feb. 22. Mr. Towne spoke to the assembled 
school giving his impressions of various pic- 
tured incidents of Washington's life. 

Eleanor Parker spoke of Abraham Lincoln 
the Apprentice and the Master Workman, and 
Lucy Hopkins delivered the Gettysburg Ad- 
dress. Katherine Braithwaite spoke on the 
Failures and Successes of Washington ; Mar- 
guerite Gillespie repeated the Civic Pledge and 
led in the Flag Salute. Each girl deserves 
credit for her natural appearance and earnest 
delivery. The patriotic songs sung by the 
school always add much to the fervor of our 
tribute on the anniversaries of our great men 
and great events. 



LASELL CLUB NOTES 



ANOTHER NEW LASELL CLUB 

The youngest member of the family of La- 
sell Clubs is the Philadelphia Lasell Club 
which had its beginning at a luncheon at the 
Hotel Adelphia on January twentieth. A very 
pleasant informal time was enjoyed by the 
twenty-one present. After the luncheon officers 
were elected : Jennie Hamilton Eliason '04, 
President; Lois Brader Buchner '14, Vice- 
President; and Annie Merrill David '12, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. Dorothy Payne White- 
way '14 was appointed chairman of a com- 
mittee on constitution and by-laws. 

When the business was over each girl in 
turn around the table rose and told her former 
name, if changed, the number of children, if 
any, her husband's business, or her own. Af- 
ter these interesting introductions and renew- 
ing of old friendships, Dr. Winslow was eager- 
ly listened to as he gave news of Lasell of 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



the present and plans for her future. Greet- 
ings from the new club were sent to Dr. Brag- 
don. 

The Philadelphia Lasell Club has made a 
fine start toward becoming a strong and active 
club. The list of those present follows : 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 

Carleen H. Brooke (1917-18) 

Katherine Mason Fernald '99 

Jessie C. Shepherd '17 

Grace Rowe Vail '05 

Annie Merrill David '12 

Lois Brader Buckner '14 

Dorothy Payne Whiteway '14 

Rosamond K. Kent (1918-20) 

Madeline Sheldon Her f with '16 

Ethel Moore Richardson '12 

Una Wise Haas (1911-13) 

Jennie Hamilton Eliason '04 

Alma Dunn DeLong '11 

Marion Shinn '11 

M. Constance Erdman '03 

Maude J. Hay den '16 

Tryphina Uhrich Ludwig (1900-01, 03) 

Edith Hobson Fricke '19 

Elizabeth K. Carlile '17 

Dorothy Osborne (1917-18) 

Marion Stahl Schofield (1901-2, 03-06) 



THE NEW YORK LUNCHEON 

The midwinter reunion of the New York 
Lasell Club at Hotel Pennsylvania on Janu- 
ary twenty-seventh was also a celebration of 
its thirtieth birthday. This is the oldest of 
the various Lasell Clubs now flourishing in 
many localities in the United States. It is also 
a very strong club as shown by the attendance 
of seventy-five at this recent luncheon. It 
was a most enjoyable occasion. The girls were 
seated at round tables in groups of classes, or 
of those in school at about the same time. It 
was a pleasure to the club to have as a guest, 
a member of the Chicago Lasell Club, Mar- 
garet Jones of Evanston. This was not the 
year for election of officers. Mildred Hall 
Seber '12, Pres., and Mary Fenno Stirn '13 
continue their very efficient service. Greet- 



ings were sent to Dr. Bragdon; Dr. Winslow 
spoke, followed by a few words from Mrs. 
Winslow and the time for good-byes arrived, 
all too soon. 

The names of those attending this luncheon 
were : 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 

Cornelia DeGroff Talbot (1900-01) 

Ethel Clark Osborn (1901-02) 

Ella Hazelton Russell '04 

Laura C. Simons (1902-04) 

Margaret Bailey Krause (1896-98) 

Helen W. Moss '19 

Norma MacMillan (1914-18) 

Leilya K. Barkman '22 

Frances O'Brien '19 

Phyllis Rowe '19 

Eleanor Thompson '20 

Katherine Patterson (1916-18) 

Elizabeth Moyer Wilson (1916-18) 

Margaretha Alexander (1921-22) 

Freda Griffin '20 

Gladys Burnet '20 

Esther Murray (1917-19) 

Mildred Patten '20 

Helen O'Brien '20 

Dorothy G. Ely '21 

Josephine Florence '20 

Harriet Frey Golder (1914) 

Anita Hotchkiss Scott '18 

Cornelia Gaty '18 

Jeannette Leventhal Brooks (1915) 

Jessie C. Shepherd '17 

Hazel Brady '17 

Lillian Lafrey '17 

Charlotte Swartwout '14 

Mary Hannah Bingaman '14 

Katherine G. Bingaman '15 

Esther Underwood '14 

Frances Johnson Edward '15 

Una Wise Haas (1911-13) 

Dorothy Payne Whiteway '14 

Jean McKay (1911) 

Helen E. Ludeke (1913-14) 

Florence Swartwout Thomassen '09 

Julia DeWitt Read '10 

Harriett Rutledge (1906-07) 

Louise W. Morrell '08 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Louise Kelley Ultes '07 

Louise McCarthy Plankenhorn (1905-07) 

Anna White Drake (1906-07) 

Anna L. Conant '09 

S. Gertrude Bull (1907-08) 

Sally A. Moore (1907-08) 

Gladys Stults (1909-10) 

Louise Ballentine Paisley '09 

M. Alice Fuller (1906-10) 

Eva Ferris Foote (1895-98) 

Maude Mayo Bentz '98 

Ada C. McCoy '98 

Carol Case Dennison '99 

Evleyn Ebert Allen '99 

Mollie Taylor Rathbun (1890-94) 

Bess Phelps Yocum ( 1890-92) . 

Mabel Case Viot '94 

Anne Burr Day (1888-90) 

Ruby Blaisdell Carter (1888-89) 

Carrie M. Brown '89 

Grace C. Huntington, (1887-89) 

Elizabeth Harwood Fones '89 

Mary Bigelow Green (1884-86) 

Annie M. Gwinnell (1885-88) 

Mildred Hall Leber '12 

Margaret Jones '11 

Lucy Russell Webb (1908-10) 

Nina Dietz Harwood '11 

Vera Bradley Findlay '11 

Mary Fenno Stirn '13 

Mrs. R. G. Ludwig (1900-03) 



THE MID-WINTER REUNION 

The New England mid-winter reunion of 
the Lasell Alumnae Association came one week 
earlier than usual. For good reasons it was 
felt by changing the date this year we would 
secure a larger attendance of our local con- 
stituency. Dr. Bragdon is usually a good 
prophet, but contrary to his prediction laid 
down in his most welcome letter it was not 
a "bleak New England February day" for us. 
A lot of that Pasadena sunshine over which 
he enthuses got mixed with our local weather 
and we met under bright skies. The guests 
were received by Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, our 
president, Evelyn Schmidt '14, and Miss Pot- 



ter '80. It was good, to welcome so many 
of Lasell's foster children back home again. 
Informality and a real get-togetherness char- 
acterized this reunion. The committee of ar- 
rangements, Doris Brown '21, chairman, made 
the table bright with spring flowers. Without 
doubt the guest of honor at the president's 
table was Mrs. Mary F. Walworth. We give 
below a list of the old girls in attendance. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Towne. 

Miss Potter '80. 

Katharine O'Brien (1921-22). 

Edna Starrett '22. 

Evelyn Schmidt '14. 

Elsie Doleman '14. 

Doris Brown '21. 

Marjorie Lovering '22. 

Harriette Case '22. 

Marjorie Gifford '22. 

Deborah Ingraham '19. 

Louise Furbush Prout '20. 

Priscilla Alden Wolfe '19. 

Mile. LeRoyer. 

Barbara McLellan '18. 

Janet Edgerly Fellows (1918-19). 

Mrs. Smith. 

Mrs. McDonald. 

Mary Rose Green '86. 

Mary Dodge Whittemore (1903-04). 

Eva Robertson (1903-04). 

Fannie MacKenzie (1903-04). 

Esther McMaster (1918-19). 

Harriett G. Scott '94. 

Naomi Davis '22. 

Prof. Hills. 

Edna Mae Beaver (1912-16). 

Corinne Heinsheimer Meyer (1886-87). 

Adelyn Pearce (1917-18). 

Mabel Rutledge (1917-18). 

Lydia Greely (1917-20). 

Ruth Hayden '20. 

Lucia Parcher Dow (1902-03). 

Edith Burt Wells (1902-03). 

Jessie MacMillan '82. 

Mildred Freeman (1917-20). 

Alice Taylor Potter (1898-00). 

Marguerite Hardy Chandler '20. 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



Esther Mae Landis '18. 

Alice Jenks Wilson (1896-00), 

Miriam Day Giles '17. 

Florence Bell Merrill '17. 

Katherine Jenckes Knox '04. 

Mary King '21. 

Miss Johnson. 

Helen Rishell '99. 

Mrs. Wagner. 

Mrs. Furlong. 

Miss Shapleigh. 

Miss Arey. 

Helen Brooks '20. 

Senorita Orozco. 

Mrs. Saunders. 

Miss Austin. 

Miss Ells. 

Miss Mattoon. 

Miss Dudley. 

Miss Romkey. 

Mary Colby Walworth, '67-'68. 

Miss Crockett. 

Helen Webster '19. 

Lillian Packard '83. 

Mrs. Martin. 

Pauline Butler '21. 

Mrs. Cardwell. 

Mrs. Hooker. 

Senora Orozco. 

Mrs. Hilbourn. 



Mrs. Corinne Heinsheimer Meyer (1886- 
87) just "happened in" and was delighted to 
find the friendly party "on" and she a part of 
it. We were again indebted to the Lasell Glee 
Club, for they sang for us not only Martin 
Luther's "grace," but a dear song of welcome 
to the old girls. After enjoying a delicious 
luncheon provided through the generous hos- 
pitality of Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, we lis- 
tened with pleasure to the gracious words of 
welcome from our president, Evelyn Schmidt, 
followed by an interesting report from Prin- 
cipal Winslow concerning his recent visit to 
the Lasell Clubs, old and new, a loyal chain 
extending from Northern Maine out to Ne- 
braska. Dr. Winslow's optimistic message 
was gratefully received. The readers of the 



Leaves have already enjoyed a part of it in a 
previous issue of our school paper. He did 
not fail to tell us of our opportunity and privi- 
lege of expressing school loyalty in different 
and practical ways. Mrs. Winslow's wise and 
witty speech delighted us all. With her per- 
mission we repeat it in part. 

After extending a welcome to the home-re- 
turning girls, Mrs. Winslow said, "I wish there 
were opportunity for a visit with each one of 
you, but at these reunions the time vanishes so 
quickly that we often feel like the young wom- 
an who, upon being asked if she had ever been 
through Algebra, answered, 'Yes, but it was 
on a fast express and I didn't see much of the 
place.' But a handshake and a few words 
are much better than nothing, even if our visit- 
ing must be as condensed as the account of the 
story of Elisha by the boy in Sunday School — 
'Elisha lived in a cave and the boys troubled 
him. He told them if they kept on troubling, he 
would set the bears on them and eat them up. 
And they did, and he did, and the bears did.' " 
Mrs. Winslow then told of the trip which she 
and Dr. Winslow made last summer from their 
farm in Turner, Maine, to Bangor and then to 
Fort Fairfield to attend Lasell luncheons, also 
of the Philadelphia and New York Lasell Club 
meetings. She said, "After these delightful 
reunions my general feeling is somewhat like 
that of Alice in Wonderland after drinking 
the contents of the bottle, leaving a sort of 
mixed flavor of cherry-tart, custard, pine-ap- 
ple, roast turkey, taffy and hot-buttered toast, 
to which I would add lingering memories of 
Lasell, blue decorations, bright spring flowers, 
echoes of Lasell songs, hearty hand clasps, a 
bit of news, old friendships renewed, new 
demonstrations of the loyalty and goodwill of 
Lasell girls everywhere, and a firmer and firm- 
er belief that our big Lasell family is 'every 
day in every way growing better and better.' 
And with the co-operation of our wonderful 
Lasell family in whom we justly take pride, we 
cannot but have faith in the fulfilment of the 
vision of a future Lasell continuing the best 
of the old and becoming more and more a 
power and a blessing to all. I feel sure that 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



our faith is not as exaggerated as that of the 
little girl who ended her prayer with, 'And 
please, God, make New York City the capi- 
tal of New York.' To her mother's question- 
ing she answered, 'Well, I wrote it so in my 
examination paper, and I just have to have it 
right.' " 

Miss Potter then read Dr. Bragdon's char- 
acteristic greeting. As the letter was read one 
after another of his old girls enthusiastically 
exclaimed, "Doesn't that sound just like Dr. 
Bragdon !" At the close of the reading a tele- 
gram of love and appreciation was sent to 
Dr. and Mrs. Bragdon. 



DR. BRAGDON'S MESSAGE 

My dear "Girls" : 

When I got ("got" is a good word! Have 
you ever thought how many different meanings 
it has ? Try it ! it has almost as many mean- 
ings as "fix"!) your President's wire I said 
to myself "What's the use? I write the same 
old things and I know they can't care to 
listen to my prattle when they have Miss 
Lillie Rose and Principal Winslow ready to 
tell them live news about the Lasell of today, 
its great achievements and greater plans. My 
little Lasell of 1874-1908 didn't aim at big- 
things ! It only tried to help my few girls to 
a bigger life and to make them want it." 

But when I got your President's note with 
its clever wish I changed my mind and said, 
"I surely will write something if only to show 
my appreciation of his deft compliment". 

"Bobby" Burdette once wrote me, "I have 
262 bones in my body (or was it 282?) and 
every one of them cries out for flattery." 
Tho' I don't confess to such hunger I think 
every one of us, if honest, will acknowledge 
the power of the pleasant word even if we 
know we do not deserve it. 

Here you are again, under the shadow of 
dear old Lasell ; I would love (as you girls say 
when you mean "like") to be there with you. 
Some of you I know, many I would not, for I 
suppose the new girls (since my day) outnum- 
ber the older ones. But you are all faithful 
Lasellians or you would not be here on this 
bleak New England February day, and as such 



I greet you and thank you for coming. I could 
wish you had our sunny Southern California 
climate to make it easy for you to get about, 
but after all the easy things are not always 
the best ! Our sturdy New England has bred 
strong souls as well as bodies, and the fight 
that makes us strong is the thing to be thank- 
ful for. 

There are a good many Lasell "girls" out 
here and I hear from many who are "making 
good". I am proud of them — almost all of 
them. They are women to be proud of, strong, 
fine women, useful as well as ornamental. We 
have our Club Reunion on the second Tuesday 
in March and if any of you chance to be here- 
abouts on that day you would be most welcome. 
Write or phone me and I'll tell you the place. 
Now I'll let you go, thanking you for listening 
so patiently to your old Principal who put his 
life into the old school and who has an undying 
interest in her and in all who can pronounce 
the magic shibboleth — Lasell. 

Cordially 

C. C. Bragdon 
615 Prospect Boulevard, Pasadena, California. 

Phone Fair Oaks 4742. 

Come and see me. 

Write if you feel like it. Don't if you don't. 

Subscribe for the Leaves. 

Betty Aston's daughter called. Who re- 
members Betty Aston ? 

God be with you, every one! 

At the invitation of our President the As- 
sociate Principal, Mr. Charles F. Towne, gave 
a stimulating message referring especially to 
the fine and unique ideals for which our school 
stands. Mrs. Martin closed our program with 
her truly optimistic slogan, "I am well and 
happy, I am well and happy, hurrah !" She 
said, and indeed it is quite true, that she began 
the preaching of her splendid gospel of good 
health and happiness many years before M. 
Coue made his discovery. We were sorry not 
to have a word from our former Registrar, 
Miss Packard '83, but were glad of her pres- 
ence at the reunion. 

An interesting feature of the Reunion was 
the announcement of three additions to our en- 
dowment fund : Miss Harriet G. Scott of the 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Class of 1894 has given her $100 Lasell Bond 
to the Fund of the Class of 1894. The Presi- 
dent of the Alumnae Association, Miss Evelyn 
Schmidt, announced a gift of $100 from mem- 
bers of her class with which to start the Fund 
of 1914. Mrs. Martin brought a check of $25 
which she had received in payment for an 
engagement with the Woman's Club of North 
Conway, N. H., arranged by Josephine Fish 
Pendergast, and promised a further gift of 
$100 with which to start the Blanche C. Martin 
Fund. 

These gifts, together with the pledges re- 
corded below, are a real encouragement that 
our endowment fund will grow. 



PLEDGES FOR LASELL ENDOWMENT 
Class of '98 Fund. 

Emma Aull Duncan 
Class of '99 Fund 

Evelyn Ebert Allen 

Ethlyn Prentice Knight 
Class of '07 Fund 

Clara Nims 
Class of '11 Fund 

Louise Mayer Schein 
Class of '12 Fund 

Florence Jones 

Esther Morey Hain 
Class of '15 Fund 

Susan E. Tiffany 
Class of '16 Fund 

Helen Merrill Strohecker 
Class of '18 Fund 

Ruth Newcomb 

Cornelia Gaty 
Class of '19 Fund 

Mercie Nichols 

Ethel Ramage Fisk 
Class of '20 Fund 

Muriel James Morrison 
Class of '21 Fund 

Marion Bodwell Lesher 

Helen L. Beede 
Class of '22 Fund 

Lucile Pfeifer 
Class of '23 Fund 

Elizabeth Buettner 



Helen Buettner 
Dorothy Chase 
Carolyn S. Colton 
Josephine Curry 
Lucy Fuller 
Florence Gifford 
Ruth Hopkins 
Ida Markert 
Jean Merrick 
Elizabeth Mitchell 
Claire Parker 
Louise Puckett 
FI. Mercedes Rendell 
Evelyn Shidler 
Adrienne E. Smith 
M. Eugenia Swift 
Jessie Watters 

General Endowment Fund 
Mabelle Hamlin Barby 

Guy M. Winslow Fund 
Mrs. G. M. Winslow 
Dr. G. M. Winslow 




Our matrimonial roster is unusually small 
this issue, nevertheless Lasell extends her 
hearty congratulations to the happy quartette. 

Fannie M. Gates '17 became the bride of 
Mr. Maximilian H. Frey on the thirty-first 
of January. 

The wedding announcement of Mary Lillian 
Quick '17 to Mr. Harry D. Dean has been 
received. Mr. and Mrs. Dean will be at home 
at 352 Riverway, Boston, Mass., after the first 
of March. 

The engagement announcement of Helen 
Sanborn '20 to Mr. Harland Stimson Rowe is 
received. 

The engagement of Lilian Wood '22 to Mr. 
Edwin E. Pierce is announced. 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



Evelyn Dunham Mason '15 opens her letter 
with an expressed wish to attend the mid- 
winter reunion, but finds it impossible to leave 
her little son, of whom she gives this vivid and 
fascinating picture: "He is sixteen months 
old, walks everywhere, and loves to investigate 
fireplaces and coal-hods. Nevertheless he is 
a darling and I hope to bring him some day 
to visit Lasell." Evelyn enclosed a most 
charming family group of the three genera- 
tions. 

Kate Whelden Plumb sends to our Principal 
and his wife friendly greetings in acknowl- 
edgment of their Christmas card and. also en- 
closed a charming snapshot of her family. 
Girls of her time will be interested to see 
Kate's fine group of little children, — the oldest 
one is now fourteen years of age and a sopho- 
more in high school, while the youngest is ten. 
Speaking of the approaching Lasell luncheon 
Mrs. Plumb writes, "We all look forward to 
the yearly meeting. We usually have from 
thirty to fifty girls present. Many of them 
were at Lasell in my time. It is such a pleas- 
ure always to have Dr. and Mrs. Bragdon 
with us, I wish you and Mrs. Winslow could 
attend — it would be a treat for us all. I still 
have the picture of your four children — they 
are a splendid quartet." This friendly mes- 
sage brought with it Mrs. Plumb's annual sub- 
scription for the Leaves. 

Katherine Katz was unable to attend the 
Lasell reunion as she is now a full-fledged 
teacher in one of the Vermont high schools, her 
special subjects being English and History. 
She expresses the hope of being with us at 
Commencement time. The invitation to Kath- 
erine was received too late because of her 
changed and to us unknown new address. Let 
us take this opportunity to urge every old girl 
to send her present address and also the new 
addresses of any girls who she chances to 
know have recently changed their places of 
residence. 

Irene Purinton Pierce writes Dr. Winslow 
that she is now substituting as a teacher in the 
Augusta, Maine, high school and her husband 
is finishing his course at Bowdoin College. 



We wish Irene success and thank her for for- 
warding us the address of a possible new girl 
for next year. 

Nellie M. Richards '93 of Groton, Mass., 
sends a most gracious note to Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow. We have begged the privilege of 
quoting a part of her message. She writes, 
"I regret that I cannot attend the Mid-winter 
Reunion to say 'thank you' in person. You 
are always so thoughtful of us really 'old 
girls' and have taken us so whole-heartedly into 
your affection and kind regard that we scarcely 
feel any change from the old days, and it is 
very comforting to be so warmly welcomed 
when we do return. My training at Lasell 
stands me in good stead on many occasions. 
I have often thanked her consciously and un- 
consciously for my share of the heritage." 
Nellie, to our joy, expresses the hope of being 
with us in June. 

We have been looking and longing for a 
sight of dear Alice Phillips Weeks '19 since 
her return from India to New England. She 
has not yet called, but sent to us recently a dear 
little card announcing the birth of a daughter, 
Cornelia Van Marter Weeks. 

Josephine Burt Wright '17 sends her New 
Year's greeting in a unique form, a card an- 
nouncing the birth of little Francis Marion 
Wright III, born January 5th. Our congratu- 
lations to these dear Lasell mothers and 
fathers. 

Emma F. Barker, sister of our Mrs. Fannv 
Barker Coffin '68, writes to Dr. and Mrs. Win- 
slow, "Allow me to express my sister's thanks 
for her Christmas greeting, 'Bound firm by a 
bond unbroken'. Her feeling for Lasell is 
still near and dear to her and she recalls with 
pleasure the happy times she has had there 
during the past years. She has been very ill 
and is now confined to her bed. The sudden 
death of her dear sister recently was a terrible 
shock to her." Most sincerely do we appre- 
ciate this loving and loyal message from our 
alumna. 

Dr. Winslow has learned recently of Mabel 
Harding's serious sickness, from which we are 
glad to say she is gradually convalescing. 



LASELL LEAVES 



/ 
The former head of our Art Department, 

Mary Augusta Mullikin, is having a most suc- 
cessful career in her chosen work in China. 
She sent to our Principal recently a catalog of 
paintings exhibited by her in Gordon Hall, 
Tientsin. The subjects of the paintings were 
wholly Chinese and judging from the long list 
of purchasers must have been very popular 
with those who were privileged to visit the 
exhibit. Among those who were fortunate in 
securing Miss Mullikin's paintings we note the 
names of the Belgian, American, and British 
consuls, also the French consul and ex-presi- 
dent Hsii of China. Four of these fine paint- 
ings are now in the possession of ex-president 
Hsii. We do not wonder that Miss Mullikin 
sends word that her stay in China is indefinite. 
She is fortunate in being at home in Tientsin 
with her sister, Mrs. Lowry. Our congratu- 
lations and best wishes are always extended 
to this gifted artist. / 

We were indeed glad to receive at last a 
message from Cornelia Hemingway '22. She 
writes, "I have often wondered how everything 
is going at Lasell, especially the Missionary 
society." Among several things Cornelia adds, 
"I have been quite busy this winter with vocal 
lessons and am president of our Young Ladies' 
Mission Circle in the local church, so you see 
I am carrying on what I started at Lasell. 
We are so pleased to have Caroline Hoitt 
McAlester and her husband, as neighbors. We 
often compare school news. About two weeks 
ago she invited Minnie Brockett Slay ton '21 
and her darling '21 class baby, "Bud" Birdsall 
'22, Ruth Adler '22, and myself to spend the 
day with her. There certainly never was a 
happier get-together than this one. I hear 
often from Jean Field '22, she is busy taking 
lessons on the harp. I often see Lillian Ter- 
hune just long enough for some "Lasell talk". 
She closed with "Mother, Father, and Sister 
wish to join in remembrances." How natural 
and pleasant it seems to include the whole 
loyal Hemingway family in our school roster ! 

We regret to announce that our instructor, 
Miss Nell E. Woodward '15, has been obliged 
to take a furlough on account of ill health 



25 



resulting as a sort of aftermath of the grippe. 
She is planning to spend some time at her 
home in Denver, Colorado. We feel sure of 
her speedy recovery under the splendid pan- 
acea known as "mothering". 

We all think very tenderly of our school- 
mate, Hazel Small, in her bereavement over 
the sudden passing on of her cousin. 

Dorothy Moore '22, Phyllis Rafferty '22, 
and Josephine Holbrook '22 are certainly 
faithful to Lasell. Every once in a while 
they come home to our delight and apparently 
their pleasure. 

Miss Woodward's work is now being carried 
on by Miss Barbara Fenno from Westminster, 
Mass. Miss Fenno is a graduate of Sargent 
school. 

Several of our faculty have heard recently 
from our dear Miss Tuttle and the latest mes- 
sage was that she had just had an interesting 
call on Miss and Dr. Morgenthaler and had 
just been enjoying a sea plunge. The mes- 
sage was most welcome, especially to those of 
us who received it in the midst of arctic 
scenes. We rejoice that our friend is having 
such a happy, comfortable winter. 

One of Miss Potter's valentines was from 
Katherine Tufts. She was delighted to re- 
ceive it, but wishes that dear Katherine had 
added a few words about herself. 

Genevieve Tiernan '22 writes from Ft. 
Scott, Kansas, that she wishes she could be 
back with the Lasell family, and the day she 
wrote she received the Lasell Leaves and in 
her own words "immediately sat down and 
fairly 'ate up' all the Lasell news." She adds, 
"I can hardly tell you in mere words how 
much I have missed Lasell this year. I have 
been very busy and of course have in a certain 
measure kept myself from being too lonesome, 
but no matter how hard I try there are many 
things which tend to bring Lasell vividly to 
my mind. Soon you will be having your 
Washington's Birthday party ; how I wish I 
might pop in and be with you. Last Sunday 
in church we sang, 'Rejoice, ye pure in 
heart', and it surely made me think of our 
Sunday Vespers processional ; how I do miss 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



those Sunday services. Next week Mother 
and I go to Kansas City to take a darling kit- 
chenette apartment for a few months. I am 
to study at the Kansas City Conservatory of 
Music with Maestro Eldorado Sacherdote. I 
am quite anxious to begin my vocal lessons 
again. I wish I could tell you how much I 
miss you all." Our loving good wishes are 
extended to this clear graduate and her 
mother. 

The last edition of the Conservatory Bulletin 
reports the new officers for the Senior year 
book, the Ncumc, and among the editors we 
find the name of our Eloise Carey '20. We 
are proud of this recent honor extended to this 
graduate. 

Senora Orozco has recently received two 
interesting messages from her former pupils. 
One is from Joe Kenyon '22, written in Cuba, 
and as a part of the message is in Spanish we 
shall have to pass it over. She closes in plain 
English with this remark, "It is wonderful 
here," and sends love to all. Margaret Home 
'22 writes to Senora from Brussels, Belgium. 
Margaret has been a great traveller since her 
graduation and seems to enjoy this changing 
about, but does not forget her Spanish teacher 
at Lasell. 

A newspaper clipping was sent to Mrs. Mc- 
Donald, which announces the marriage of 
Ruth Renwick Dunlop to Mr. Ledlie W. Con- 
ger of Clyde, Ohio. They will make their 
future residence in Europe, and. Ruth's parents 
have sailed to the Old World and will remain 
there until they get the bride and groom set- 
tled in their new home. 

Josephine Burt Wright '17 has received the 
baby book from Dr. and Mrs. Winslow. She 
writes, "My young son is doing well. We are 
all very proud of him. Gertrude Buettner '17 
gives me the Lasell news which she receives 
from her sisters," and closes her friendly note 
with best wishes for Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
and the school. 

Mrs. Martin has very kindly offered to read 
for any of the clubs in which Lasell girls are 
interested, in the interest of the endowment 
fund, it being understood that any net income 



will go to the building up of the endowment 
fund. At North Conway, N. H., Mrs. Martin 
read, "If I Were King", and afterwards gave 
a talk and answered questions under arrange- 
ments made by Josephine Fish Pendergast. 
Any who desire to reach Mrs. Martin can 
reach her at 11 Tetlow St., Suite 31, Boston, 
Mass. 

Lasell girls are growing increasingly enthu- 
siastic over the coming trip to Washington, 
especially as President Harding is the hon- 
orary member of the Senior Class. It is 
hoped that many of our girls will avail them- 
selves of this opportunity of spending Easter 
Sunday in our national capitol. 

A notice appeared recently in the Boston 
Herald announcing the sudden passing away 
of Florence Moulton Schaefer (1875-77). Old 
girls will remember Mrs. Schaefer was the 
daughter of the poetess, Louise Chandler 
Moulton, and we might truly add, the adopted 
daughter of our dear Miss Blaisdell. 

Our Preceptress was delighted to receive a 
message recently from Gertrude Schumaker 
'22. She opens her letter with these words, 
"The Leaves has just come and made me 
'homesick' again for dear old Lasell. I am 
now a college student attending Boston Uni- 
versity, at the College of Secretarial Science, 
a wonderful place, but I do often long to go 
back to dear old. Bragdon Hall so full of 
tradition and memories." Gertrude adds, "Do 
you remember Helen Mason, whom you gave 
into my care the first year at Lasell ? She is 
now a Boston University student and doing 
splendidly. It was such a pleasant surprise to 
find her here. Last Saturday I met a young 
man at my cousin's home who was present and 
heard my "Farewell to Bragdon." He knew 
many girls of 1922 and 1923. What a little 
world this is after all ! Maria Orozco is an- 
other precious link with Lasell whom I occa- 
sionally see." Gertrude's younger sister is 
planning to go away to school and we join 
with Gertrude in hoping that she will come to 
Lasell. Gertrude gives a very pleasant rea- 
son for her wish, "I feel that my sister can 
get so much in a dearer, more intimate way at 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



Lasell than at any other school." We hope 
Gertrude's intention to come home to us will 
soon materialize. 

Helen Gould Balcom '20 writes from Buf- 
falo that she often wishes herself back in the 
school home. She also has a relative whom she 
hopes will be enrolled at Lasell the coming 
year. Since leaving Lasell Helen has been 
staying at home with her family. She has re- 
fused a number of invitations to serve in busi- 
ness and the musical world, feeling that her 
duty is with her family. Helen repeats the 
news which we have recently published in the 
Leaves concerning Julia Rankin '20 and Sarah 
Crane '22. Dorothea Droege was recently 
with Helen for a week-end. She reports 
Dorothea fine and not quite willing to give up 
her old. home in Dunkirk for New York, the 
city in which her family have recently settled. 
She also ventures this bit of news, " 'Peg' 
Russell, way out in California, is teaching 
school, and 'Al' Grimes '20 is studying kin- 
dergarten in Chicago." With you, Helen, we 
feel surprised to think that three years have 
passed since you were graduated. Carry out 
your good promise to come back to Lasell 
soon. 

Lucy Curtis '80 is again spending her win- 
ter in Boston so as to be able to enjoy the 
many fine religious conventions which so ap- 
peal to this devoted church-woman. She sent 
a gracious note to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow ex- 
pressing her appreciation of their courtesy at 
the time of the Reunion and also thanking 
them for the Christmas greeting which so 
touched the hearts of our "old girls". 

Four Lenten meetings under the auspices of 
the Federation of Women's Church Societies 
were held in greater Boston recently. The 
Congregationalist, Baptist, Unitarian, Epis- 
copal, and Methodist women united in these 
community services. Our Preceptress, Miss 
Potter, was the speaker at the first meeting. 



JOKES 



Dentist: "Want gas?" 

Absent-minded Motorist: "How much a 



gallon?" 



"Are you the photographer, Mister?" 
"Yes, Ma'am." 

"And do you take children's pictures?" 
"Yes, Ma'am." 
"How much do you charge?" 
"Seven dollars a dozen." 
"Then I can't have them taken. I've only 
got eleven children." 



Dean (absent-mindedly) writing a dinner 
invitation — "Failure to observe this notice will 
not be excused." 



Our idea of a ventriloquist is one who can 
answer to two consecutive names at roll-call 
and get away with it. 



No girl buries her nose so deeply in books 
that she can't get at it with a powder-puff. 



"You might try our Rip Van Winkle rugs." 
"What is there special about them ?" 
"They have an unusually long nap." 



"Wanna go on a sleighing party?" 
"Whom are you going to slay?" 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



She : "You raised your hat to that girl who 
just passed. You don't know her, do you?" 

He : "No, but my brother does, and this is 
his hat." 



"You want to keep your eyes open around 
here today ?" 

"What for?" 

"Because people will think you are an awful 
fool if you go around with them shut." 



'How did you get all those wrinkles?" 
'From worrying." 
'What did you worry about ?" 
'About getting wrinkles." 



Mr. E. J.: "They call some of these Lasell 
girls human dynamos." 

Mr. Ordway: "Why?" 

Mr. E. J. : "Because everything they have 
is charged." 



A negro was being led to the gallows, when 
he yelled, "What you all running for? Noth- 
ing g-wine happen till ah gets there." 



Freshman (dining for the first time at the 
local Ritz, pointing to French word) : "I'll 
have some of that, please." 

Waiter: "Sorry, sir, but the orchestra is 
playing that now." 



"Do you know our new minister is just 
wonderful? He brings home to you things 
you never saw before." 

"H-m-m. — That's nothing. We have a laun- 
dry man who does the same thing." 



Lady (to guard in prison) — "I'd like to 
speak to Convict No. 312, if he's in." 



Half asleep student in church as he drops a 
coin in the collection box — "North Side trans- 
fer, please." 



Cultured gentleman, proudly— "This chair 
goes back to Louis XVI." 

Young student friend — "What's the matter 
with it?" 



Fond Parent — "What's worrying you, son?" 
Willie — "I was just wondering how many 

legs you'd have to pull off a centipede to make 

him limp." 



Charity: "Will you help the 'Old Ladies' 
Home' ?" 

"Surely, where are they?" 



Student — "Is your Professor satisfied with 
you r 

Fresh. — "He certainly is. Today he said, 
'If all my pupils were like you I would resign 
tomorrow !' That shows he thinks I know 
enough." 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



Miss "What would you say is the Friend — "Make any arrests today, con- 
deepest book you have ever read?" stable?" 

Bobby — "Well — I should say probably Constable — "I arrested two tourists, but, 

'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' !" darn 'em ! — they wouldn't stop !" 



"Little cuts from classes, 
Little work at 'gym,' 

Make your graduation seem 
Very, very dim." 



-, apropos of her last 



Louise to 

poem. — "Nothing but gas !" 

"Oh, I see — something the matter with the 
metre." 



"My dear, have you heard how Mrs. Hooker 
ran over herself? No? Well, she asked Har- 
old to run over to Gardner on an errand and 
it took him so long that she ran over herself." 



"Dicky, sit down and quiet your little sis- 
ter. Tell her a story." 

"I did just tell a story to Dad, and I can't 
sit down." 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



ijf BAKE R'S S 

CARACAS SW.EETI 

CHOCOLATE 




W MADE BV .-SS 
WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

DORCHESTER. MASS. 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 






Established 1780 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



MASKS 
FAVORS 
PUZZLES 
NOISE MAKERS 
NOVELTY BALLOONS 
NOVELTY F&PER HATS 
ETC 



Boston Joke.Trick & Novelty Company 

2Z BromfieIdSt-Boston9,Mass 



Clever Joker Novelties. 

Dance. Dinner and Pai-tu Favors. 

"Your Special Party Colors in Favors toOrder 

Holiday Specialty Favors InTheir Season 



BOSTON JOKER 
DRIBBLE GLASS 
BUZZER LETTER 
MAOSHUAUOW-SNA1CE 
fc COMIC COOK BOOK 

COMIC PLACE CARDS' 
MIMSTREL JOKE BOOK. 
ETC. 



30 LASELL LEAVES 



THE VALLEY RANCH 




BRAND 

HORSEBACK TRIP IN THE ROCKIES 
FOR YOUNG LADIES 

The party leaves New York in private Pullmans on June 30th, arriving in Cody, Wyoming, 
on July 4th for a day of the famous Cody Stampede, an exhibition of the days of the Old West. 

From this point a forty day saddle and trail trip commences through Yellowstone National 
Park, Jackson's Hole, and the Wyoming Big Game Country, returning to Valley Ranch for a 
few days' visit and the Ranch Roundup before returning East. 

The party is on the go all the time through the most beautiful, interesting, and picturesque 
wild country of America. Seven weeks of solid fun and enjoyment. 

From a Recreational and Educational standpoint this trip can not be duplicated. 

For catalogue giving full information, address: 

JULIAN S. BRYAN, Director 

Valley Ranch Eastern Headquarters 

2044 Grand Central Terminal, 70 East 45th Street, New York 

Telephone Vanderbilt 2335 

FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




ax 



Brothers 



(H^axi? i&OBts, HtnUts ««* (®tt\)\b& 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 

CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 

FOR 

REAL SERVICE 

Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 

A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 


STUDENTS! 


WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 

SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 

THINK OF 

— - — g£-o7r-^-^ of Boston J 

THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON [7] SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 


A FRIEND 


L P. Hollander go. 

Established 1848 

NEW ATTRACTIVE 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 


Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 
57 and 58 N. Market St. Boston 


202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 
BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement I 1 l £ South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



3=a 



QUALITY 




« SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



O. S. REED 
HtwUv 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waltham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Hay market 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese. Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH. 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



Gotorite 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON. MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 




Foot 



dHi 



wear ana Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

Thatis always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 



Inc. 



FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 

364 BoylstOn Street ArfintftonStreet 
Established 1858 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 




1923 ^ 



SMART 

WALKING 

SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 

ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON. Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., Boston 

Telephone Rich. 820 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home e:ip e 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 

tone quality and scientific adjustment. 
Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E. J. Moneuse, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 



Skcilla'smin 



— DUTCH — 





CHOCOLft 



Wm. m. flander 

'.8-49 IND3A«TR£I 
BOSTON DISTR1BU' 




_i^ 



-.. ^ 



Ifi piSB 



Invalids 
and 

convales- 
cents 
thrive on 
it 



The 



most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 





'©©©©©ft 



THE ISLAND CAMP FOR GIRLS 

For Booklet address Mrs. Charles F. Towne 
Lasell Seminary, Auburndale 66, Mass. 




LASELL LEAVES 



New York 
394 Fifth Ave. 



Boston 
161 Tiemont St. 
164 Tremont St. 



Philadelphia 
1311 Walnut St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



SEASONABLE and REASONABLE 

GIFTS 



18 inches 






24 " 




Tj ' 


27 " 








30 " 








36 " 

48 " 


n 


Q 


60 " 


IbK 





Prices 
$3.00 
up to 
$100 



IMITATION PEARL NECKLACES 




WRIST WATCHES 
$ 1 8.00 in Gold Filled $30.00 in Solid Gold 

$100.00 with Diamonds 




F. F. DAVIDSON 



n holesa]e"^r^tail , summer st 

JEWELEFb «§s£%» 



F. F. DAVIDSON, Jr. 





Vol. XXXXV1II 



No. 5 



APRIL, 1923 



LASELL LEAVES 



£>ag it tmtly MmxtttB 




(dtjanj* arnmtttfi anltrit^ 



LASELL LEAVES 




Our Shopping Counselor 

will shop with you or for you 

She is a woman of excellent taste and long shopping experience. Address Shopping Counselor, 
Jordan Marsh Company, Boston, or Call Beach 3200 



Jordan 



Marsh C 

Boston 



ompany 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



A specialty store that is 
ideally fitted to satisfy the 
apparel wants of the college 
girl. Everything here is 
authentic in style and de- 
pendable in service. 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




Make Your Rug 
Dollars Count 



Oldest Rug House 
in America 



Linoleum Time Is 
This Is Linoleum 



I" 1 VERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
*—* The same applies to offices and public places in general. 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



tl anA QWt /rv 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




383 WASHINGTON ST 
BOSTON 



&sell Leaves 

Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOS TON, MASS., APRIL, 1923 No. 5 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 



Business Manager 
JOSEPHINE CURRY 



Joke Editor 
LOUISA C. VENABLE 



Assistant Joke Editor 
M. EVELYN SHIDLER 



LIST OF OFFICERS 



Editor-in-Chief 
HELEN L. CHAPMAN 



Local Editors 

MARGARET BUNNELL 
MARY M. DeWOLF 



Subscription Manager 
ARLINE ALLSOPP 



Athletic Editor 
CAROLYN S. COLTON 



Literary Editor 
ELIZABETH BRISTOW 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 



CONTENTS 



FRONTISPIECE • • ■■ • • 

LITERARY 

The Return of Handicraft 

To Travel Hopefully 

Winged Words 

The Drama of Our Days 

Life's Interpretation 

The Family Picnic 

The Lasell of My Dreams 



A. Swope 

■ N. Jaffe 

• ■ I. Varney 

B. Pinkham 

M. Dougherty 

A. Hendee 

E. Hadley 



5 
6 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
13 
14 



Hunting Partridges B. Sweetland 

EDITORIAL 

LOCALS • 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 15 

ENDOWMENT PLEDGES 16 

LOST GRADUATES • 17 

COMMENCEMENT REUNIONS AND PROGRAM 19 

PERSONALS -■ • • 19 

JOKES ■ • 24 




General of the armies 
washington 



November 
Thirtieth 
19 2 2 



Kiss Bertha Krakauer, 

President, Glass of 1924, 
La sell Seminary, 

Woodland Part, 

Auburndale, I'ass. 



lily dear Miss Krakauer: 

Your letter of November 22nd with 
the information that the Class of 1924 at Lasell 
Seminary had elected me an Honorary Member, 
arrived during my absence in the we3t , which must 
explain this delay in acknowledging it. I feel 
very much honored and gratified at the high 
compliment paid me by the Class of which you are 
President, and it gives me a great deal of pleasure 
to accept. Some time when I happen to be in New- 
England I hope it may be possible for me to have 
the great pleasure of meeting the members of the class. 
Meantime, I wish you all every success and nappineus. 



Cordially yours, 



/^X^^^^^-^^. 



\£^. 




THE RETURN OF HANDICRAFT 

It is said that history repeats itself. In the 
days of our grandfathers the handicraftsman 
was before the public eye. He had his own 
work room where he toiled from morning until 
night on some product which bore his own 
personal stamp. In this shop his life was re- 
volving with endless enthusiasm ; it was in 
every way the expression of his own artistic 
temperament. He was an artist in his own 
industry, and responsible for the romantic 
spots in nooks and corners of the town and 
city. He loved his labor, for it was intellectual 
and moral exercise. 

Those were the days in which the customer 
was the critical judge: he went into the arti- 
san's shop as a lover of his wares, seeking the 
elegance of quality ; his choice was regarded 
as a compliment to his own personality ; he 
wanted, to live with the article of his desire and 
become attached to it. It was a part of his life 
and was not regarded as a mere curio for the 
eyes of the shallow and unappreciative. Those 
were the days of the elite ; for there was a 
sense of poetry in industry and a deep and 
sincere regard for its products. In other 
words, "the hoard was small, but the heart 
was great." 

We are beginning to learn that which 
our ancestors never questioned : that beauty 
whether applied to marble, canvas, or a spoon, 
is art. We are ushering true art again into our 
homes : stained glass windows in dwellings are 
regaining popularity ; we are hearing and 
learning about the hand-made and decorated 
candles of old. Much of our interest has been 
awakened by the exquisite work of the Art 
in Trades Club. They have given those who 



are interested, a chance to learn definite things 
regarding interior decorating so that they may 
express their own personality in their homes. 
We are demanding work for the potter and 
silversmith which is distinctive and individual. 

The expression of ideas has always found 
an outlet in mural decorations : on the walls 
of our public buildings today we see the history 
of our people and our country being brought 
into prominence ; with the dawn of history 
ancient Egypt, Nineveh and Babylon covered 
their walls with printed reliefs in marble or 
s one. These depicted the occupations of man 
on earth and his life in the hereafter as they 
conceived it — ; other walls were adorned with 
geometrical designs with flowering borders or 
Arabic inscriptions. In Egypt, Assyria, and 
Persia during the eleventh and twelfth cen- 
turies glazed bricks or tiles were used, modeled 
in relief and covered, with enamels. The Ro- 
mans had a secret preparation of hard stucco 
capable of a marble-like polish on which they 
lavished polychrome decorations. The print- 
ing of wall cloths with dye colors and mordants 
is a very ancient art. During the fifteenth 
century, in Europe, canvas was painted and 
used as an imitation of tapestry. Wall paper 
seems J o have originated in China, which was 
the cradle of many decorative arts. 

In the matter of architecture we give too 
much display to symbols which mean little or 
nothing to us, symbols which in their own time 
represented only the most primitive thoughts. 
On each side of the entrance of one of the 
banks in our city, appears a carved standard 
which the Romans carried in their marches to 
victory. One may be reasonably sure that 
when people enter these doors with their bank 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



books in their hands they never consider them- 
selves on a "march of victory" — and such 
things as the sacrificial skulls of oxen, the 
triumphant Roman shields and lictors' rods 
placed over candy shop windows and millinery 
parlors are neither fitting nor inspiring. 

Recently there has appeared a change in 
the public opinion ; we are facing a restoration 
of ideas in art. Not long ago in a neighboring 
city a huge poster was placed on all bill boards. 
It was a sheet of solid block ; from the bottom 
arose two immensely muscular arms in red, 
thrusting themselves up against two jumbled 
lines of red and blue buildings, furnishing a 
triangle of broken patches of color over the 
two arms. The poster seemed simple enough 
in its design ; that was all there was to it, 
with the exception of the mystic letters "R. 
V. R." But every one understood its meaning. 
The artist had clone his job. He had given the 
public, (those slick haired gentlemen, and lithe- 
some ladies in motley gear and trappings) the 
theme of the play which was to come. No 
press agent was needed. The interesting thing 
about the poster was, it represented Cubistic 
Art, a thing which the public had hitherto 
stamped as utterly mad and utterly silly. But 
here they came upon it with no art prejudices 
in mind and accepted without a quiver the new 
unusual method of "putting across" an idea. 

Ancta Swope. 



TO TRAVEL HOPEFULLY 

Since time immemorial art has been man's 
expression of life. But just as our ideal of 
the expression of youth has been outraged 
through the "Flapper Doll", so has art been 
distorted with its impressionistic "Blue Cow" 
and "Cubist" effects. The quota of admirers of 
such pieces of work is comparatively small 
in proportion to those who have the real con- 
ception of artistic values, though a recent num- 
ber of the "International Studio" does amuse 
in saying, "Day by day, in every way we get 
Russian-er and Russian-er" in our zeal for 
unusual effects. 

The present day artists are showing a touch 
that has seemed to bring art out of war into 



peace : their themes are the result of many a 
battle ; those brave enough to fight and over- 
come once more are awakening dreams in 
us of purple hazes, gray mists, clear azures ; 
inducing visions. 

Americans in their painting as in their litera- 
ture are expressing man's relation to nature, 
with the consequent emotional emphasis that 
the vision — the sense and the romance of it — 
is in his own soul. "Fervidly eschewing 
rhetoric, the artist awakens in us a romantic 
response to the formal beauty of nature." 
This power to express man's joy in nature is 
an intrinsic quality : the delicate touches being 
as curiously rhythmical as in verse. 

"If the public will not come to art, art must 
go to the public", sounds practical as well as 
educational. But it looks now as if the public 
were taking the initiative. The increase in the 
interest of real art is indicated in the annual 
report of attendance at the art museums which 
shows a marked increase in the number of 
people patronizing it. 

To be an artist one does not have to be a 
sculptor or painter : — that is the beauty of the 
thing — a mechanic may be artist as well as 
artisan. An artist is one that can perfect a 
certain kind of work. But the perfect art has 
never been exhibited, which perhaps leads us 
to think of the quotation by Robert Browning : 
"The true glory of art is that it is never satis- 
fied ; always new desires and new aspirations 
arise carrying men higher." 

Naomi Joe Jaffe, '24. 



WINGED WORDS 

Which are you, a Pollyanna or a "Joy- 
Killer" ? 

The cheerful person is glad that she is in this 
joyful world ; she is happy when she can assist 
any worldly creature ; yet she grasps every 
opportunity to play with the fairies. Her ad- 
versary has a different line : he wishes that 
he were not in this melancholy world. He 
does not approve of bestowing assistance on 
anybody ; he is a grouchy companion and re- 
minds one of the dwarfs. He even disap- 
proves of fairy tales. 



LASELL LEAVES 



The fairies in turn dislike any one who 
would put a ban on their merriment. They 
revel in song and dance, and is not that the 
very reason the many exquisite stories have 
such charm for us ? 

The question arises, "What is a fairy tale?" 
The pessimist decries the incidents in such a 
tale as "unnatural, unfitting" : the optimist sees 
that they are artistically prepared and full of 
the joy of her every day. 

The wicked dragons, giants, and witches are 
punished in fairy stories ; so the villain pessi- 
mist will reap as he sows. 

Children detect these situations : tales of di- 
minutive folk who triumph over the wicked 
dragons and pessimists. 

The pessimist asks, "Shall our childlife be 
permitted to believe that there were such hor- 
rible creatures ?" The optimist, who under- 
stands children because she loves them, replies, 
"Don't fool yourself, old fellow, even children 
are wise enough to know that dragons become 
extinct, and as they read about those uncanny 
things they will perceive that there are people 
to-day who attempt to take the joy out of life 
even as the dragons did, and. will be on guard 
when such individuals come their way." 

Will that silence the pessimist for a while ? 
Not for long, for he does like to talk and 
argue. He will soon break forth with, "The 
kindergarten's morality, mentality, and man- 
ners must be protected ; "Cinderella" and 
"Sleeping Beauty," even if destitute of obvious 
perversions, are in subtler ways far more de- 
moralizing ; and "Puss In Boots" glorifies lying 
and trickery." Here he should be checked by 
the cheerful one who could answer, "Cinder- 
ella" is charming and is exquisitely portrayed ; 
it will live for ages as a symbol that virtue 
reaps its own reward." 

Here enters the matter of virtue. Do 
parents hesitate to take their children to the 
motion pictures where they see women smok- 
ing and life in all its pathetic comedy? 

Some people say, "Have a theatre especially 
for the children." Algernon Tassin writes that 
he saw two delightful child plays where the 
few boys and girls in the house had a languid 



air of being educated while the many elders ap- 
peared to be enchanted. A child theatre, if it 
is to be filled with grown-ups, will accomplish 
little. 

Encourage the youngsters to read fairy 
stories. There is scarcely anything which is 
more artistic or mentally stimulating with their 
color, blithesomeness and delicate touches. If 
a child will amuse himself with a fairy book 
he will not only be enchanted, but will also seek 
the real meaning of life. 

Think what it would mean not ever to visit 
the fairy realm! The coming generation 
would never meet Alice in Wonderland. 
Surely we cannot stand for such disillusion- 
ment ! We, as optimists, must keep our al- 
luring fairy tales from disappearing from our 
literature. 

To our words give the wings of the fairies ! 

Isabelle M. Varney. 



THE DRAMA OF OUR DAYS 

Do you think that Shakespeare uttered a 
valuable truth when he said, "All the world's 
a stage" ? If a man with an intellect as. prac- 
tical and as imaginative as his considered each 
of us an important actor in life's drama, need 
we hesitate to acknowledge the power of the 
word "Drama"? 

Even the most care free once in a while 
deliberate on life and its problems yet un- 
solved. What is life? Just a bit of music, 
a dash of melodrama — its comedy played with 
grace, pleasure, and satisfaction if we are wise. 

Try to escape or turn from it, the fact will 
still face you that life is drama surveyed 
through the focus of life's trials, life's sun- 
shine, life's laughter, life's love. 

Does the thought ever occur to you when 
you read the "Dramatis Personae" on a pro- 
gram that every clay of your life you, yourself, 
are playing a far more consequential role than 
the actors that you are viewing? 

Drama means primarily "the true and simple 
portrayal of simple life and character com- 
posed to attract the attention and sustain the 
interest in what is commonly called a play." 

Without doubt the instinct for truth is the 



LASELL LEAVES 



primitive reason of our pleasure in beholding 
the stage. The dramatic instinct exists in all 
of us, each possessing the power of portraying 
the beauty of her life in an individual manner. 

The contemporaries of Shakespeare aided 
his efforts by their feeling for dramatic art. 
Nothing so quickly won his audience as a 
clever, new turn of phrase. It was the art of 
expression that the Elizabethans appreciated. 

Though not as well-known as Shakespeare, 
there came an Elizabethan, Marlowe by name, 
who struck a new chord in dramatic art by 
writing plays in a light, rapid verse. With his 
wonderful lyrical as well as dramatic talent 
he wrote plays which fairly leaped and sang. 

It was not enough that Shakespeare him- 
self should understand his drama : he made the 
very characters in his plays love the art ; his 
Hamlet must see that, "The play's the thing, 
wherein I'll catch the conscience of the King" ; 
in his Merchant of Venice the child of his 
imagination talks, "I hold the world but as 
the world, Gratiano, a stage where every man 
must play a part, and mine a sad one." 

But Shakespeare was not the only artist to 
consider life a "tremendous drama" : Thomas 
Heywood uttered an alarming truth in an 
original manner by saying that "The world's 
a theatre, the earth a stage ; which God and 
Nature do with actors fill." Where Shakes- 
peare believed the world the stage, Heywood 
argued that the world was the theatre, the earth 
the stage. But solve the problem as you will : 
life is drama. 

The "Modern Drama" as it is called, stresses 
this same truth, suggesting the realities of life 
to us rather than declaring the fact, as the 
plays of olden days were wont to do. 

The old time audiences threw themselves 
into the heart of the play as our modern 
audiences have never been capable of doing. 
Perhaps the correct interpretation is lacking, 
yet we do believe that the audiences of today, 
especially American audiences, are more and 
more insistent in their appreciation of the 
simplicity and reality of dramatic art. 

This desire to see ourselves as God means us 
to be is innate. Oliver Goldsmith had a 



wonderful conception of the nature of man 
when he said, 

"On the stage he was natural, simple, affecting, 
'Twas only that when he was off he was 
acting." 

To act our parts naturally will best prepare 
us for the greatest drama of them all, — 
eternity, 

"Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, 
That struts and feels his hour upon the stage 
And then is heard no more." 

Let us act well our parts lest we dream away 
the drama of our days! 

Barbara Pinkham. 



LIFE'S INTERPRETATION 

With the proper setting, costuming and 
music, there is not a flower, animal or char- 
acter that can not be interpreted beautifully, 
mysteriously or humorously as is most ap- 
propriate. 

Art and music have always been looked up 
to as the two great arts. But dancing has just 
as important a place, for after all, it is a part 
of the other two — all in close touch with one 
another. 

Dancing has been defined as moving lightly, 
rhythmically and nimbly as if to music ; leap- 
ing, bounding, quivering and vibrating as with 
excitement. One could scarcely realize by the 
simple definition of dancing that it could 
have so many phases and play so important a 
part in this world. Year by year it is more 
appreciated as an art and as a profession. 

There is not a pageant presented, a popular 
play, or more especially a musical production, 
but has clever dancers on the program, not 
only to furnish a more pleasing aspect, but 
to carry out the plot in a way that nothing else 
could substitute. 

It can be recognized easily that dancing is 
one of the revelations of the beauty of nature. 
How well I remember the day I first con- 
templated this fact. How gloriously alive 
every part of nature seemed, how brimming 
over with vitality and. the very joy and action 
of life itself, from the azure sky in which 
fleecy clouds seemed to be slowly but con- 



LASELL LEAVES 



stantly changing positions to the swaying tree 
tops ; to the very movement of the rippling 
little wavelets of a stream close by falling over 
dusky green and melancholy grey pebbles and 
merrily cadencing on ; — all seemed to be fairly 
dancing with the joy of being a part in such a 
spectacle. 

Dancing — that is it ; everything shows its 
supreme joy and beauty through dancing. 

How particularly true this is of animals ; 
they especially have rhythmical characteristics 
of their own : the scurry of squirrels, the pon- 
derous movements of elephants, the gliding- 
swiftness of the lion, the scamper of the 
mouse, the coil and recoil of the snake, the 
flutter of birds' wings, — all are really per- 
forming a most interesting and attractive dance 
movement. In fact since dancing is becoming 
a more and more intricate art daily, it has been 
recognized that some of the most effective 
dances are the interpretation of such primitive 
sources. 

Is there anything else that could personify 
and interpret such an amazing variety of 
things more perfectly? How naively one's 
moods may be revealed by dancing ; no matter 
how dreary or how gay, each has a motion of 
its own: that half floating, half shimmering 
object, drab of color, gracefully floating- 
through the haze of my thoughts, now growing- 
nearer dipping rhythmically but drearily in 
the movements of a tell-tale despondent mood ; 
that bright and glowingly arrayed figure which 
nimbly and gracefully quivers, leaps and 
bounds can not show plainly enough its joyful, 
rejoicing, jubilant feelings. 

In a very similar fashion may • even all 
weather and seasons be demonstrated ; be it the 
blowiest, snowiest day of winter or the most 
inspiring and beautiful days of spring. 

Every age since primitive man may be por- 
trayed by a special dance : the "war dance" and 
the "dance of the Medicine Man" of the 
Indians ; the weird religious dances of the 
Hindoos and Chinese ; the joyous, care-free 
dance of the Hawaiians: the "Jota" of Old 
Spain ; and the "Highland Fling" so typical of 
the Sctoch; with the graceful minuet of our 



forefathers' days; and the enjoyable "Virginia 
Reel" found so diverting- to hard-working 
pioneers. 

Dancing is not only an art, but a really 
scientific means of counteracting this restless 
age of ours. Charmingly cultivated dancing— 
and no other is classed as such — is a grave 
matter for consideration and truly deserves at- 
tention in its insistent appeal for recognition 
in the world of art. 



O DANCING! 

What a wealth of art 

Is encased in your very name : 

You are a floating maple leaf ; 

The flutter of butterfly wings ; 

You are a happy animal frolicking 

In the woods ; 

You are the incarnation of youth itself — 

Yet how well you signify 

The more sombre aspects of life; — 

Death and Grief. 

You are the keynote 

Of every age and nation. 

You are the graceful guide 

In the many hued garden of art. 

Matilda Jane Dougherty. 



THE FAMILY PICNIC 

Of course you have all been obliged to die 
a slow death varying from a few hours to 
several days, whenever the family has indulged 
in a reunion ; but have you ever attended a 
family picnic? Do you have a large family? 
And have all your aunts large families? And 
have all your well-meaning relatives picked 
you out to care for their particular children? 

I had five under my care one afternoon this 
last summer. Taken separately they are dar- 
ling children, but when they are together! 
Their mothers afterwards assured me that 
they really could have acted much worse, but it 
hardly seems credible. 

First Jimmie got lost. I never did like him 
so well as his brother, and that experience with 
him strengthened my attitude. We hunted 
for him for hours, until even the older people 
got worried. (I will say that he furnished 
occupation for the rest of the brood.) At 
length we found him in the hay fast asleep, 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



with a half-dead frog clutched in one grimy 
little hand. 

Second, Jane stubbed her toe and cut her 
knee, so that I had to use a new colored hand- 
kerchief to bandage it for her. I've always 
had a sneaking idea that she bluffed most of 
the pain. She then treated me as her especially 
appointed slave. 

Next Dick fell into the brook and I ruined 
a perfectly good pair of kid pumps in my 
efforts to fish him out. He and Jane were re- 
spectively king and queen of the whole affair 
and woe unto their unwilling subject. 

Ralph was justly jealous of all this com- 
petition, so he and Jane's older brother, Don, 
had a fight, — a real honest-to-goodness fight. 
When I separated them my hair net was 
torn into shreds and my hair all mussed up. 
But what was a little thing like that to these 
"angel" children? 

All went peacefully for a few moments. 
Then as I was sitting in the hammock reading 
a magazine, I nearly fainted at the feeling of 
a caterpillar thrust down my back. I promptly 
distributed, the young hopefuls among their 
parents. 

We left the grounds, hot and tired, as the 
sun was disappearing behind the hills. Once 
home again I secured some much needed sleep 
far from the sound of infant voices. 

It was only the other day that I heard 
Mother describing the affair to a friend, when 
she said : "We really had a wonderful time. 
It seemed so good, to see all the girls again 
and they all have such beautiful children !" 

I think Mother either has a short memory or 
she is "some" optimist ! 

A. Hcndee. 



IN SPRINGTIME 

"In the spring a young man's fancy 
Lighth r turns to thoughts of love." 
Oftentimes you have heard quoted 
These lines you see above. 

Let me add a verse now timely 
Which may accompany that : 
In the spring a young girl's fancy 
Quickly turns to her spring hat. 



Oh ! the thought and solemn pondering 
On that deep and weighty question 
Of a headgear for the springtime! 
Oh, the searching for suggestion ! 

There's a far more simple method 
To get hats than all the shopping, 
As you rush from store to store, 
Frantically your bundles dropping. 

Now to those who wish a bonnet 
Let me give this good advice, 
Learn to make and trim your headgear ; 
Learn to make a hat so nice 

That your friends will all exclaim 
Full of wonder, full of awe, 
"Oh, my dear ! that charming chapeau 
Is the best I ever saw !" 

And although you never made one, 
And although you think you can't, 
Let me tell you you'll learn 
To make hats most elegant. 

So my advice, again I give, 

In this lengthened little sonnet : 

loin Lasell's swift busy class ; 

Make and trim your new spring bonnet. 

A. Trondsen, '24. 



THE LASELL OF MY DREAMS 

Not long ago, after a conversation with a 
group of girls, I dreamed one night of a new 
Lasell. 

At seven-thirty in the morning a trim little 
maid crept into my room, closed the windows 
and made a nice glowing fire in the fire-place. 
At nine o'clock I was wakened by a waitress 
who brought in an attractive tray with bacon, 
eggs, toast, coffee, griddle cakes and maple 
syrup. After languidly finishing this meal I 
got out of bed, had a shower bath and. by the 
aid of the first maid I managed to slip into my 
navy blue panne velvet gown, silk stockings and 
slippers. It was a rule of the school that no 
girl could take more than three subjects a day 
and it had been thought advisable to eliminate 
chapel lest some girl might feel some stirring 
of discontent. 

The first class opened at ten o'clock. Just in 
time a limousine called for us and took us to 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



the foot of Bragdon hill where we mounted the 
escalator and were carried to the top. 

After attending our three classes we went to 
the dining-room and had our choice of salads, 
sandwiches, ice cream, cake, chocolate, coffee, 
ginger ale and fruit punch. 

Immediately after lunch we were taken back 
to our dormitories. Some of the girls had 
planned to attend the tea-dance which was to 
be held down stairs, while others were dressing 
to take their own cars and go to a matinee in 
town or for a drive in the country. Some of 
the girls could be seen walking about the 
Campus with men, all handsome and well set- 
up. 

At night the dinner was very formal. All 
girls were requested to wear evening dresses 
and elaborate jewelry. The newest and most 
extreme ear-rings and head bands were worn 
and the dining-room was ablaze with sparkling 
light. 

At eight o'clock the men again appeared 
and dancing was~ enjoyed until a late hour, 
when exhausted we wearily wended our way to 
the elevator and were taken to our respective 
floors where a simple midnight lunch of Welsh 
rarebit, hot dogs, and frosted cake awaited us. 

"Ding, dong ! ding, dong !" I opened my 
eyes only to find that it was quarter of seven 
and that I must jump out into my cold room, 
slam down the window, dress for breakfast, 
look over my French verbs and write the con- 
cluding paragraph of my book review of 
"The Fool's Paradise". 

E. Had lev. 



MY ROOM-MATE 

Many a time she calls me down — 

My room-mate. 
Many a time she makes me frown, 

My rocm-mate. 
Many a time, during many a day — 
When I'm blue, my thoughts far away. 
She cheers me up and I want to say 

I like her — my room-mate. 

Many a time she makes me cross — 

My room-mate, 
Many a time she thinks she's boss — 

My room-mate. 



Many a time when I am wrong 
And she is right — we don't get along, 
And it's then she starts to sing a song, 
I like her — my room-mate. 

She forgets my cross words of yesterday — 

My room-mate, 
When "Good-morning" I cheerfully say — 

My room-mate. 
Today is full of other needs 
Than ugly words or evil deeds, 
Today she plants her kindness seeds, 

1 like her — my room-mate. 

Many an errand I do for her — 

My room-mate, 
Many a letter I bring to her — 

My room-mate. 
Many a time she makes me sad, 
Many a time she makes me glad, 
Many a time — Oh, she isn't bad ! 

I like her — my room-mate. 

Many a time she speaks in fun — 

My room-mate, 
She talks before our lessons are done — 

My rccm-mate. 
Many a time she's dreadfully slow, 
Many a time she bothers me so, 
But I want you every one to know 

I like her — my room-mate. 

M. Murray, '24. 



HUNTING PARTRIDGES 

Partridges are birds often heard but seldom 
seen. The average partridge is about ten 
inches long. His feathers are brown and 
black — soft and shiny — sometimes tipped with 
gray or white. 

For two reasons it takes a great deal of skill 
to shoot partridges ; first, because the feathers 
of a partridge, being the color of the trees 
and bushes, act as a camouflage; second, be- 
cause a partridge does not sing, trill or treble 
like most birds ; the only sound that he makes 
is with his wings. But one thing makes the 
partridge more easy to shoot than some birds : 
a partridge never flies farther than two hun- 
dred yards and seldom higher than the tree- 
tops — hence you can easily follow up your 
prize. 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



Pick out a dense woods — although you may 
find partridges in the open, especially near 
water. Start early, preferably after a rainy 
day or night. Walk carefully, so as not to 
snap twigs. Keep your gun raised and your 
eyes alert. 

As I have said — a partridge does not sing, 
but when he flies his wings make a whirring 
sound, like a miniature aeroplane. When a 
partridge makes this sound a hunter calls it 
"putting up." You often hear a hunter say, 
"I put up four partridges this morning, but 
only got two of them," meaning four flew near 
him, but two escaped. 

Soon — with luck — a partridge will "put up" 
near you. Fire instantly. If you miss aim, 
follow, for the partridge will soon light on 
some bough, probably near the ground. 

One day while in the woods with my father, 
who was hunting, I followed two other hunters. 
A very funny sight greeted my eyes. A 
young lad stood in front of a clump of bushes, 
throwing in it, stones and sticks. A partridge 
was there. Soon the bird would "put up," but 
the boy could not pick up his gun quick 
enough to shoot. The other hunter was laugh- 
ing so hard that he was unable to fire. The 
fellow would not listen to us, but kept up this 
manoeuvre. Try to picture him running about 
throwing stones — and his disgust at shooting 
nothing, and you will see how funny it was. 

To hunt partridge with satisfactory results 
you must be alert, patient and keen. Most men 
hunt partridge as a sport and enjoy the pastime 
about as much when they shoot nothing as 
when they bring home three or four birds. 

Many people in the country shoot partridges 
for food. The meat is much like chicken, al- 
though it is a little darker and has to be 



cooked longer. 



B. Szvectland. 



SYMPHONY 

Slowly the audience fills the empty hall, 

The great bell rings ; like ants with great delibera- 
tion 

In swarm the musicians, each one to his place. 

Again the warning rings ; one last flurry of remov- 
ing hats, 



And almost with one sigh of expectation the would- 
be listeners 
Settle in their seats with utmost content. Silence ! 

The leader with arms outstretched now gives a little 

sign, 
When suddenly upon our senses bursts such harmony 
Of sound as ne'er was heard before! 
As though some melody sublime hath for a length 

of time, 
Come down to earth. 

One little ripple of sweet music, of a babbling brook 
In spring, doth hold our ear ; 

Then louder, ever louder 'til a roar of many waters f 
Could the sound of the many waters which are 

eternal 
With all their majesty rush on more grandly? 

Then with a change of rhythm, breaks forth a lively 

tune. 
You now behold with inward eye — 
Which has the power of seeing all — 
Lithe young girls gracefully sway ; 
The neighbors all have gathered round for a gala 

holiday. 
Above, the sky is blue, beneath, the turf is green; 
In festive garb the youths and maidens gay, 
The rollicking call of the music ob2y. 
With a curtsy, quick turn, and a whirl, 
Charmingly they play. 

From this merry tune, we float into another melody, 
Scarce knowing that we listen to a lullaby 
Until we see a mother humming to her little one, 
And listening to her song we nearly lose ourselves 

in sleep. 
But as the music holds us fast we soon are wide 

awake, 
Wondering to ourselves if music could ever be more 

sweet ! 

But wait ! A martial strain comes to our ears ; 

The cymbals clang, the drums do beat an undertone 
of marching feet ; 

There is a boom, the bugle blows, 

What burst of harmony is this ! 

With rapt attention we strive to comprehend, 

It is too deep for us to fathom ; 

Yet we are music lovers, one and all, 

And in the vastness of that hall, each is centered 

On the sound about him 

And knows it beautiful ! 

Elizabeth Frick, '24. 




One of the most popular of the many art 
objects designed by the Woolworth Company 
for the adornment of Harlem Flats is a touch- 
ing little picture entitled "The First Step". At 
first glance it is a simple enough thing : — a 
little child is represented as making an heroic 
effort to cross the tremendous chasm between 
his father and mother. 

Men are accustomed to glance perfunctorily 
at this picture and then to turn to the news- 
paper or the nearest illustrated magazine for 
more art. Women congregate before it, mur- 
muring ecstatically, "Isn't he just too cute 
for words ?" 

But to us the picture has a more serious 
meaning, a deep symbolism. We recall that we, 
too, are stepping out. We look at the picture, 
and see ourselves like the child — utterly alone, 
a difficult and. dangerous path to cross — and 
the goal, after all, only a beginning. 

Have you, gentle reader, considered the full 
force of the suggestion carried by the words 
"Stepping Out" ? To the Junior Class it means 
the beginning of our career and the assuming 
of our responsibilities. Courage ! Persever- 
ance ! 



course. But while you are getting that neces- 
sary foundation you are getting something else 
of vast importance, — true friends, whom you 
will have throughout your lives. 

Every one has a best friend. What does 
yours mean to you ? Is she the only one with 
whom you are confidential or have much in 
common? Don't you think there are others 
with whom you might become better acquainted 
and who would enjoy your friendship? Try 
being friends with every girl. Do you ever 
stop to think that perhaps the reason you can- 
not get along with your roommate, or your 
neighbor, is due to some little failing on vour 
part ? Why not overcome it instead of blaming 
some one who might become a firm friend? 

A true friendship is something which must 
be striven for, and if done in the right spirit 
it will be found. We need nothing today more 
than a friendly feeling towards those with 
whom we come in contact. Be friends with the 
world and the world will be friends with you. 



FRIENDSHIP 

What is the greatest thing in your school 
life? Is what you read in books, or study in 
class that which you will carry away with you 
as the principal reward of your days at school ? 
Is it the school spirit centered around the 
basket-ball or hockey games, or the social 
life that you enjoy best? I wonder how many 
stop to think what a year away from home 
with several hundred sisters means. Why do 
you go to school? To get an education, of 



Just what is the secret of success ? There 
are varied answers to this question. The 
Button says, "Push is the solution. Without 
Push one forever stands outside the door of 
opportunity." 

"Be always up to date," remarks the Cal- 
endar. 

"Find a good thing and stick to it," suggests 
the Glue. 

"Make the best of your good points," ad- 
vises the Compass. 

"Spend a lot of time in reflection," cries the 
Mirror. 

As the Mirror is, herself, a shining success, 
perhaps her answer is the clearest. 




We have enjoyed, an unusual number of 
school activities during the past month. 

The Senior Prom, February 24, was a feast 
of food, music and sociability. The decora- 
tions were exceptionally attractive, — also the 
participants — according to the universal ver- 
dict of the underclassmen who gazed and 
listened longingly through the windows. 

At the last reception of the series of three 
given at Bragdon Hall, March 16, a large num- 
ber of guests as well as students were greeted 
by Mrs. Winslow and Miss Potter, Mr. and 
Mrs. Towne in the receiving line. 

A most pleasing dramatic and musical pro- 
gram was heartily enjoyed, as expressed by 
prolonged applause. Those taking part were 
Helen Schroer, Matilda Dougherty, Barbara 
Pinkham, Louise Puckett, Louise Woolley, and 
Katherine O'Brien. 

The Junior-Senior Dinner Dance took place 
March 17. The decorations and favors were 
most individual, the color combination of the 
two classes, black and white and purple lending 
itself pleasingly to a most artistic scheme, 
transforming the dining-room at Woodland 
into a veritable bower. In the soft shaded light 
the class songs were sung and to the enchant- 
ing music of the orchestra an evening of feast- 
ing and clancing passed, all too quickly. The 
prize in the "Lucky Number" dance was a 
corsage made up of the two class flowers, 
violets and red roses. 

To the strains of the good-night song the 
lights were lowered until all that was visible 
was the illuminated Junior banner, which, 



hitherto concealed, had on this occasion made 
its triumphant appearance to welcome 1923 
at their Junior-Senior dance. 

March 3 the following Seniors gave a well 
rendered and most successful dramatic recital 
for the Senior Endowment Fund, — Louise 
Venable, Mary Ann Miller, Louise Puckett, 
Norma Prentiss, Jean Merrick, Bonnie Orlady r 
Helen Hinshaw and Louise Woolley. 

The Seniors gave a unique "Book Party" for 
their sister class March 10. Each girl came 
representing a well known book. Artistic dec- 
orations, refreshments and dancing added to 
the enjoyment of this "novel" entertainment. 

March 11, Mr. George Grimm led a camp- 
fire vespers, and spoke of how religion should 
be carried out in our daily life. 

One of the most inspiring Vesper services of 
the year was that of March 11, conducted by 
five little chaps from Caney Creek, Kentucky. 
With great earnestness they spoke of their 
ideals and of their efforts to gain an education, 
also of the aid needed to carry on the deserv- 
ing work of these brave, struggling mountain 
schools. Miss Buchanan spoke briefly but most 
impressively of the possibilities of these moun- 
tain people and of their sacrifices to their na- 
tion in the World War. 

Mrs. Martin gave us a most invigorating talk 
in chapel, March 10 ; and on Wednesday even- 
ing, March 21, gave a most enjoyable rendering 
of "If I Were King" to a large and apprecia- 
tive audience. We thank you, Mrs. Martin, 
both "old" and "new" girls. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



Did the Gym ever look so lovely as when 
transformed into a Japanese garden, March 1, 
on the occasion of the Seniors' tea for the En- 
dowment Fund ? The ceiling was latticed with 
wistaria and cherry blossoms ; Japanese lan- 
terns shed soft light ; demure, gaily dressed 
Japanese maids flitted about to alluring music 
dispensing most delicious food at the con- 
stantly filled little tables, decorated likewise in 
true Japanese style. Every one was enthu- 
siastic over the artistic as well as the practical 
results, for which, Seniors, accept our hearty 
congratulations ! 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

Feb. 27. We were glad to welcome Dorris 
Elliott into our home school. Dorris had been 
a day pupil up to this time. 

March 1. Little Anna Moffat's refrain "My 
mother's come to stay !" AVe welcome Mrs. 
Benson. 

We have been spending our Sunday morn- 
ings happily, though the epidemic of contagious 
diseases in the village has prevented our at- 
tending church. A long walk with the teacher 
in charge followed by a "service" of stories 
and music have made the mornings pass 
pleasantly and profitably. We are indebted 
to Mrs. Wagner, who kindly loaned us some 
very fine Victrola records. 

March 7. Three Woodland Park girls had 
places on the program given by Miss Eichorn's 
violin pupils at Bragdon Hall. The Junior 
school was represented in the following 
numbers : 
Allegro Moderato Pleyel 

Dorothy Smith — Gwendolyn McDonald 
Cradle Song Kohler 

Andante et Air de Ballet Daube 

Gwendolyn McDonald 

Told at Twilight Huerter 

Minuet Beethoven 

Dorothy Smith 

March 15. The older group of the students 
of Allen-Chalmers Military School were the 
guests of our Junior High dancing class. 
This class has been unique this year, a dancing 
class of girls only. It has proved very success- 
ful and made the one afternoon's party a real 
treat. 



March 17. Two parties in honor of St. 
Patrick ! The eighth grade entertained the 
lower grades with a play followed by games. 
The living-room is still wearing the pretty 
green and white decorations. 

Miss Johnson of Lasell Latin department en- 
tertained, the ninth grade at her home in Au- 
burndale. The very jolliest kind of party! 
Games and all sorts of brainracking contests, — 
a dainty supper, and the Virginia Reel played 
by Mrs. Johnson. The girls are very grateful 
to Miss Johnson and her mother for their 
gracious hospitality. 

Miss Gertrude Bull of White Plains, New 
York, a former teacher at Woodland Park, is 
the guest of Mrs. McDonald. 

We have had calls from the following "old 
girls" : 

Betty Savage 
Esther Curtis 
Virginia Hendrie 
Dorothy Messenger 
March 23. Mr. Towne and Mrs. Mc- 
Donald received a large number of guests on 
Friday evening, March 23, the occasion of a 
recital at Woodland Park school. The follow- 
ing program was presented : 

Pupils' Recital 

at 

WOODLAND PARK SCHOOL 

Auburndale, Mass. 

Friday Evening, March 23, 1923, at 7.45 o'clock 
Program 

Little Waltz Mathilde Billero 

Mary French 
Cradle Song Albert Locke Norris 

Marjean Himelhoch 

Lullaby Nathaniel Hyatt 

Norma Lambert 

Allegro Moderato (violin duet) Pleyel 

Dorothy Smith— Gwendolyn McDonald 

Chorus : Summer is Coming 

Mandolin Song 
Song of India Rimsky-Korsakoff 

Elizabeth Rhoades 



To a Wild Rose 


Mona Towle 


MacDowell 


Melody (violin) 
Rondo 




Kassert 
Schmidt 



Marjorie Winslow 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



Reading : There are Fairies at the Bottom 

of our Garden A. W. Forsyth 

Gertrude Curtis 

Chorus : Tree Top Duet 

Fisherman's Prayer 

Marche Mignonne 

Helen Parker 

Valse in G-flat Major 

Gwendolyn McDonald 
Improvisation 

Katharine Braithwaite 
Fantasie in D minor 

Victoria Jackson 
The Clock 

Julia Larrabee 
Chorus : The Sandman 
Pippa's Song 



Poldini 
Chopin 
MacDowell 
Mozart 
Kullak 



PLEDGES FOR LASELL ENDOWMENT 

Class of '89 Fund 

Susan Hallock Couch 
Class of '94 Fund 

Harriet G. Scott 

Jennie M. Rich 
Class of '98 Fund 

Emma Aull Duncan 
Class of '99 

Evelyn Ebert Allen 

Ethlyn Prentice Knight 
Class of '03 

Mary Goodwin Olmstead 
Class of '05 

Ida R. Jones 
Class of '07 

Clara Nims 
Class of '09 

Louise Funkhouser Colegrove 
Class of '11 

Louise Mayer Schein 

Mary A. Ordway 
Class of '12 

Florence Jones 

Esther Morey Hain 
Class of '14 

Mildred Hotchkiss Girvin 
Class of '15 

Susan E. Tiffany 

Class of '16 

Helen Strohecker 



Class of '18 

Ruth Newcomb 

Cornelia Gaty 

Helene Davenport Bowman 
Class of '19 

Mercie Nichols 

Ethel Ramage Fisk 
Class of '20 

Muriel James Morrison 
Class of '21 

Marion Bodwell Lesher 

Helen L. Beede 
Class of '22 

Lucile Pfeifer 

Leilya K. Barkman 

Iverna Birdsall 

Class of '23 

Elizabeth Buettner 
Helen Buettner 

Florence Boehmcke 

Dorothy Chase 

Carolyn S. Colton 

Josephine Curry 

Lucy Fuller 

Florence Gifford 

Ruth Hopkins 

Helen Hinshaw 

Ida Markert 

Jeannette Mer rick- 
Elizabeth Mitchell 

Claire Parker 

Louise Puckett 

H. Mercedes Rendell 

Evelyn Shidler 

Adrienne Smith 

Mary Eugenia Swift 

Ruth S. Throm 

Jessie Watters 
General Endowment Fund. 

Mabelle Hamlin Barby 

Ethel B. Hook 

Gertrude Gleason Shepard 

Julia Funkhouser Mellin 
Chicago Club Fund 

Bertha Hax Auld 
Guy M. Winslow Fund 

Mrs. G. M. Winslow 

Dr. G. M. Winslow 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



THE REGISTER OF GRADUATES 

LOST: GRADUATES. Can you help us find them? 

We are still in need of the present addresses of the following graduates and shall greatly 
appreciate receiving the desired information. The printing of the new Register is waiting for 
these addresses. 

Married Name 



Year Maiden Name 

1858 Alary C. Penniman 

1859 Mary D. Lane 

Mary Jane Wood.ward 

1860 Mary M. Vermilye 
1862 Helen M. Barker 

Mary Emma Mann 

1864 Mary S. Thaxter 

1866 Blanche Chandler 

1867 Josephine Bates 

1868 Isabel Treadwell 

1869 Annie R. McCreary 
Sarah E. Saxton 

1870 Anna A. Corbin 
Fannie H. Crosby 

1872 Mary E. Lincoln 

1877 Eva Newman Bragdon 

1878 Annie Holbrook White 

1879 Irene Gertrude Sanford 

1885 Lydia Starr 
Jennie Coe Williams 

1886 Cornelia Maria Williams 

1887 Florence Eveline Bailey 

Mary F. Noyes 

1889 Leah Thomasine Couts 

1890 Malvina Harper Sherwood 

1891 Sara Belle Harvey 



Marie Shellabarger 



1892 Desdemona Milliken 

1893 Eva L. Couch 
Nellie Gertrude Davis 
Elizabeth Ewing 

1894 Julia West Anderson 

1895 Mary Gertrude Bucknum 
Anne May Dickson 



Mrs. L. N. Gilbert 
Mrs. J. C. Bright 

Mrs. Benj. Dore 



Mrs. E. B. Denison 
Mrs. J. W. James 



Mrs. H. A. Fuller 
Mrs. Thos. Gilchrist 

Mrs. F. F. Judd 



Dorothy Marianna Manning 
1896 Katherine Josephine Bucknum Mrs. A. H. Mueller 



Last Address 
Upham's Corner, Mass., 

82 Magnolia St. 
Ware, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
E. Windsor Hill, Conn. 
Brookline, Mass., 32 Centre St. 
Brookline, Mass., 

29 Harvard Ave. 
Portland, Me., 66 Deering St. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mrs. Dempster Towne Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hyattsville, Md. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Webster, Mass. 
West Roxbury, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md., 448 Eutaw PI. 
E. Orange, N. J., 

40 Shepard Ave. 
Brookline, Mass., 8 Kilsyth Rd. 
Los Angeles, Calif., 
Rampart Apts. 
Mrs. Francis M. Taber Chicago, 111., 232 E. Walton PI. 
Mrs. Don C. Brainard Berkeley, Calif., 

2726 Elmwood Pk. 
Mrs. Woods Hutchinson N. Y. City, 38 E. 49th St. 
Mrs. S. D. Dorman Vera Cruz, Mexico, 

Finca de la Florencia 
Mrs. F. L. Starrett Los Angeles, Cal., 

4823 Cimparron St. 
Mrs. W. P. Anderson Weather ford, Texas. 
Mrs. W. C. West Painesville, O.. 314 State St. 

Mrs. C. W. McChesney Brooklyn, N. Y., 

1011 Lincoln St. 
Oakland, Calif., 

406 First Nat'l Bank Bldg. 
Brookline, Mass., 49 Alton PI. 
Round Pond, Me. 
Chicago, III, 428 Elm St. 
Atchison, Kan., 703 N. Third St. 
Paris, France, 

194 Malesherbes Blvd. 
Denver, Colo., 788 Marion St. 
Kansas City, Mo., 

1726 Independence Ave. 
Yonkers, N. Y., 

488 Van Cortland Park Ave. 
Manilla, P. I., 

San Fernando de Union. 



Mrs. A. S. Crowder 

Mrs. J. L. Bevans 
Mrs. W. L. Abbott 



Mrs. C. H. Willems 

Mrs. John Acors 
Mrs. J. S. Adsit 

Mrs. G. E. Mathews 



fi 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



Helen May Holman 
Blanche Linwood Kelley 

1898 Gyda Emilie Andersen 
Ada Cadmus 
Edith Torrey Grant 
Mary Pierce Johnson 

1900 Rhoda Porter 

1902 Joanna Frances Deering 
Joel Jeanne Lapowski 
Sarah Eleanor Hughes 
Callie Isahelle LeSeure 

1907 Marjorie Gunn 

Bess Gould Judson 
1909 Elsa Rheinstrom 
1915 Helen Lucile Benson 



Katherine Adelaide Hoag 
1916 A. Helen Overholser 



1918 Florence Adele Chaffee 



Mrs. L. P. Moore 

Mrs. William Gibson 
Mrs. E. A. McCoy 

Mrs. R. M. Whitney 
Mrs. E. S. Witbeck 

Mrs. C. C. Kirk- 
Mrs. A. D. Forbes 
Mrs. E. B. Tiffany 

Mrs. Percy Wicks 
Mrs. L. J. Kopald 
Mrs. A. F. Lofo-ren 



Mrs. N. F. Norgren 



Mrs. S. M. Higgins 



GIFT TO LASELL IN MEMOxRY OF 
IDA CAPRON COOK, 1 863 

There was graduated, at Lasell in 1863 Ida 
Capron of Mendon, Mass. In 1866 she was 
married to Mr. Ira Barton Cook and for some 
time lived in Rhode Island, but later the family 
moved to Chicago, and in 1899 to Evanston, 
Illinois, which has been the home of many of 
our distinguished Lasell girls. Just recently 
our Principal received a most interesting mes- 
sage from Mrs. Cook's daughter, Mrs. Olive 
Cook Connor. Its contents seem of such im- 
portance that we have asked the privilege of 
quoting it in our Leaves. 

With the letter came a tribute which ap- 
peared in the Evanston paper at the time of 
Mrs. Cook's death in April, 1922. We quote a 
few words from this message. "Mrs. Cook's 
interests were far-reaching. She was a mem- 
ber of the Universalist Church, but she also 
lead for years a Bible class for young women 
and girls in the First Presbyterian Church of 
Evanston. She belonged to the following or- 
ganizations : The Evanston Woman's Club, 
the Chicago Woman's Club. Bryant Circle, 

Pierrian Circle, Universitv Guild and Drama 
Club." 



Evanston, 111., 914 Hinman Ave. 

Everett, Mass., 201 Linden St. 

Medford, Mass. 

E. Orange, N. J. 

Summit, N. J./ 100 N. E. Ave. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Pasadena, Calif., 

16 S. Raymond Ave. 
Saco, Maine. 
Abilene, Texas. 

Lowell, Mass., 418 Wilder St. 
Streator, 111., 117 W. Wilson St. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 

4408 Chestnut St. 
Galesburg, 111. 

Hamilton, O., 5 Crescent Apts. 
Minneapolis, Minn., 

Waldorf Apts. 
Chicago, 111. 
Pasadena, Calif., 

690 S. Grand Ave. 
Minneapolis, Minn., 

2240 Stevens Ave. 




MRS. IDA CAPRON COOK '63 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



The letter, which contained a generous gift 
of $200 to the Lasell Endownment Fund from 
the family of this alumna, is as follows : 
"M y dear Dr. Winslow : 

"The enclosure is sent to Lasell Seminary in 
memory of Ida Capron Cook, who passed away 
April 21, 1922. Mrs. Cook's years at Lasell 
never ceased to be a vital part of her existence, 
as the impelling desire to study and learn, with 
which she was inspired at Lasell, continued 
increasingly through her long life. Although 
during her married life of fifty-six years, 
seven children were born to her, bringing with 
them a strenuous domestic existence, her am- 
bition and interest in study never flagged. Her 
great wish she herself expressed in one of the 
last sentences she wrote: T have always meant 
to grow and progress according to Eternal 
Purpose and whenever I get new light, I'll 
gladly "carry on" '." 

Signed, in grateful remembrance, 

For Ira B. Cook and Family, 

By Olive Cook Connor." 



COMMENCEMENT REUNIONS 

Commencement comes this year on June 
I2th. Please note the date because it is a 
change from the time stated in the catalog. 
We hope that as in recent years the classes 
which have been out five years or some mul- 
tiple will observe their anniversaries. For this 
year those classes would be : 1858, 1863, 1868, 
1873, 1878, 1883, 1888, 1893, 1898, 1903, 1908. 
1913, 1918.* 

While our resources are limited, we are 
always glad to do anything possible to help in 
securing rooms for those who plan to come. 

The program of Commencement Week will 
be mailed to every graduate as soon as printed. 
We suggest that the permanent secretaries 
and class presidents co-operate to bring us a 
good attendance for the class reunions. 

Of course, all former students are wanted 
every year. 

G. M. W. 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 
FOR 1923 

Saturday, May Twenty-sixth 
8.00 P.M. Glee Club Concert (Tickets neces- 
sary). 
Thursday, May Thirty-first 
2.30 P.M. River Day. 

Saturday, June Second 
4.30 P.M. May Fete. 

Wednesday, June Sixth 
8.00 P.M. Commencement Concert. 
Thursday, June Seventh 
2.30 P.M. Woodland Park School Recital 
and Closing Exercises. 
Friday, June Eighth 
2.30 to 3.00. Swimming Exhibition. 
3.00 to 9.00. Art Exhibit, Studio. 

Home Economics Exhibit, Carter Hall. 
Saturday, June Ninth 
8.00 P.M. Senior Reception. 

Sunday, June Tenth 
10.45. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Mcllyar Hamilton Lichliter, D.D. 
6.15 P.M. Commencement Vespers. 
To be announced. 
Monday, June Eleventh 
8.00 P.M. Class Night Exercises (Cards 
necessary). 

Tuesday, June Twelfth 
10.45 A.M. Commencement Exercises. 

Address by Rev. Ernest Graham 
Guthrie. 
2.00 P.M. Reunion of the Alumnae and 
Former Students. 




Our Editor of the Personals intends always 
to place first things first and surely no news is 
of greater interest than the wedding and en- 
paeement announcements. Here they are ! ! 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Helon James became the bride of Mr. J. 
Henry Davis, recently. Mr. and Mrs. Davis 
will be at home at 2929 Lipscomb St., Ft. 
Worth, Texas. 

The fourteenth of February was the wed- 
ding day of Marjorie Morrison '17 and Mr. 
George Sewall Coburn. 

Ruth Johnson and Mr. Paul G. Barry were 
united in marriage on the eighth of February. 
Mr. and Mrs. Barry will live in Muscatine, 
Iowa. 

Bernice Lyon '20 became the bride of Mr. 
Jule M. Herrmann on the eighth of March. 

The engagement announcement of Edith 
Boadway '21, and Mr. James Lowell McAdam 
is received. 

The engagement of Grace Warner '21, and 
Mr. Merton H. Strickland is announced. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Lillian Lafrey '17, and Mr. Louis Allen Scott 
is received. 

Bertice Carter is actually on the Chicago 
Tribune staff, having had some preliminary 
preparation in the Northwestern University 
School of Journalism. To Dr. Winslow she 
writes, ''I am now working on the Chicago Tri- 
bune, spoken of at times as the 'world's 
greatest newspaper'. I took two examinations 
at Northwestern and passed them so I left a 
good record behind me. I can return if the 
spirit moves. The experience simply fascinates 
me. It is a great study of human nature and, 
even though I am fresh at the work, I've come 
into contact with every type of person and 
every side of life. Helene Grashorn is ap- 
plying Friday for a position in the same line 
of work, so Lasell may be represented also by 
her. We both hope to come on to Lasell for 
Commencement." Bertice encloses a news- 
paper clipping from the Ft. Worth Star-Tele- 
gram giving a charming account of the "beau- 
tiful wedding" when Helon James became the 
bride of Mr. J. Henry Davis. 

Thirza Abrams '21 is certainly off on a 
wonderful and unusual journey, having sailed 
to South America, and is now the guest of her 
dear sister, Carolie Abrams Painter. We are 
hoping daily to get some descriptive letter from 



this dear graduate which we will gladly share 
with the readers of the Leaves. 
' Very recently our Principal received a letter 
from far away Nellie Choy Wong. We share 
a bit of this little autobiography. She writes, 
"Many and many a time I have wanted to 
write to you since my return to China, but 
letter writing seems impossible, because I have 
been busy getting myself adjusted to condi- 
tions and studying my native language at the 
same time. Things seemed very hard to me at 
first and everything is so different from what I 
have been used to in America, but now I have 
adjusted myself and I really enjoy life here 
and love my work immensely. I have seen 
Miss Mulliken many times in Peking and Mae 
Chan Lam was here last fall. I am now the 
manager in a drug store, the only Chinese 
woman working in an office. In this drusf' 
store there are two Chinese doctors, one from 
Harvard and the other Columbia. The busi- 
ness is getting better every day and I hope to 
open another branch this summer up Pai Tai 
Ho (a big summer place)." Nellie closes with 
an expression of what Lasell and our Principal 
did for her. Our best wishes follow her in 
her unique and far away field./ 

Katherine Foster is some distance from her 
Iowa home and sends a most fascinating card 
to our Preceptress from Granada, Spain. We 
can well believe she is having a "wonderful 
time and experience." 

Viola Sullivan 21, too, is on the wing and 
wrote Miss Potter from Bermuda. She is 
not only enjoying the trip, but finding it true 
that travel is a delightful educator. 

A large circle of loving friends will be sad- 
dened to learn of the passing away March 12. 
of our dear Sarah Ransom Hazelet (1875-9). 
For several months Mrs. Hazelet had been a 
sufferer, but was tenderly ministered to by 
her devoted daughters, Martha Hazelet Crooks 
TO, and Elizabeth Hazelet Weis. Lasell's 
tenderest sympathy is extended to this 
bereaved family and their friends. 

Susan Stryker '10 will be off again this 
summer on a transcontinental tramp. Her 
friends mav remember that in 1913 she had 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



six months of wandering" through the English 
Lake district. Now she proposes to enjoy the 
delightful highways and byways of Cornwall 
and Devonshire. At present she is far from 
her Duluth, Minnesota, home. She is with 
her parents in Augusta, Georgia, and writes, 
"The city is beautiful and already the flowers 
are in bloom and the birds singing their over- 
lure to spring." We do hope she will carry 
out her intention to come to Lasell before sail- 
ing. 

Marjorie Watkins Lucey (1908-10) has 
moved to Baltimore. She writes inquiring if 
there are any Lasell girls who may be in her 
new neighborhood and adds, "My Lasell 
friends always meant much to me while I 
lived in the vicinity of New York." 

On they come, these dear little Lasell Easter- 
tide children, receiving from us a most loving 
welcome. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Herbert D. Kynor (Madel- 
elene Halberstadt), a daughter, Edith Moore 
Kynor. 

To Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Leahy (Fern Dixon 
'07), a daughter, Ann Leahy. 

To Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Weeks (Alice 
Phillips '19), a daughter, Cornelia Van 
Marter Weeks. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jenson, Jr. 
(Helene Sweney), a daughter, Jean Marie 
Jenson. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James H. Rough, Jr. 
(Edna Crane '17), a son, James Henry Rough 
III. 

She came, we heard, and she conquered ! 
Lasell is still stirred -with Mrs. Martin's op- 
timistic message given of late to our school 
body and especially enthusiastic over her 
splendid presentation of "If I Were King". 
We are leaving the write-up to the local editor, 
but just now we have in our hands a fine 
tribute to Mrs. Martin from Josephine Fish 
Pendergast of North Conway, N. H. She 
writes : "Ever since Mrs. Martin was so en- 
thusiastically received by our Conway Club I 
have wanted to advise the girls through the 
Leaves to avail themselves of her generous 
offer to read 'If I Were King' for 



the benefit of the Endowment Fund. 
We have had very fine readers and 
lecturers, but many of our people said 
that Mrs. Martin was the best that we 
have ever had. Her interpretation was wonder- 
fully rendered and the short talk which fol- 
lowed was instructive and. kept the audience 
in good humor." As Josephine makes this 
practical suggestion some of us may not be 
able to contribute materially to the Endow- 
ment Fund, but we can in this practical way 
interest others to engage Mrs. Martin and in- 
directly augment the good cause. Josephine 
gives a fascinating word picture of their pro- 
posed summer on the farm. She and her 
husband are certainly enthusiastic over the 
open and even the practical side of farming. 
Josephine reports that Isabelle, '20 is having a 
delightful visit in Beaufort, South Carolina, 
enjoying the rest after a busy winter in the 
office of the Royal Typewriter Company. 

The latest word from Dr. Bragdon is, "The 
Southern-California Lasell Club had a fine 
meeting on March 13, forty-three there and a 
'homey' time. Emilie Kothe Collins '00 will 
send you a detailed report." With Dr. Brag- 
don's letter he sends a number of messages 
which he had received from his Western girls, 
also a fine group picture of the Omaha-Council 
Bluffs Lasell girls, with the suggestion "that 
a picture be made of this group for the Leaves, 
and mention its monthly meeting to sew for 
Lasell. It might set others to work." The 
Leaves did print a fine picture of this club a 
year ago, but we are delighted to spread abroad 
the good, news of their philanthropic activities. 

In this surprise package of Dr. Bragdon's 
was also a photograph of Grace Allen 
Clarke's ('95) three stalwart sons, each one 
over six feet tall. The Editorial Staff are 
still undecided as to which is the handsomest. 

Katherine McCoy '01 sends to our Prin- 
cipal Emeritus her regrets that she was unable 
to attend the Pasadena luncheon and writes 
further, "Remember me to all the girls I 
know. You see I still call them girls. The 
small daughter of a friend of mine said, 
'Mother, when do women stop being girls?' 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



My Lasell friends will always be girls to me. 
I met Kitty Clemens at Reading last fall where 
I went to attend the State Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs. She reported, that she and Isa- 
belle '01 were both at home. In February I 
spent a week with Marion Mann Miles '02 at 
her attractive home near Philadelphia. Her 
daughter is quite a young lady and attends 
Miss Laywood's school in Overbrook. Father 
is eighty years old and although he is well and 
active he needs my presence and care." She 
closes her letter with best wishes for the 
luncheon and kind remembrances to Dr. and 
Mrs. Bragdon. 

Edith Sisson Whipple had her reservations 
made for returning to New England the day 
before the Southern California Lasell Club 
luncheon. It was too bad. She writes to Dr. 
Bragdon, "I should enjoy being there and 
meeting the girls. I have some pleasant mem- 
ories of Lasell days. I have driven through 
your beautiful city of Pasadena several times. 
Mr. Whipple and I are enthusiastic over Cali- 
fornia. We spent two wonderful days this 
past week camping out in the desert at Palm 
Canyon, a sight never to be forgotten. Please 
remember that Binghamton, N. Y., always 
means the Sisson girls and you'll find a wel- 
come there." 

One of the interesting letters which Dr. 
Bragdon shared with us was from Fraulein 
Adele Roth, formerly on the faculty of Lasell, 
but now a professor in the College of the Pa- 
cific, San Jose, California. We would be glad 
to quote the entire letter but do not quite 
dare to do so. However, we will venture to 
repeat her fine tribute to our Principal Em- 
eritus. She opens her message with : "I am 
writing with my sister's pen and as Katharine 
Orton remarked very wisely in her last let- 
ter, 'How can anybody write with a borrowed 
pen !' I am visiting at present with my sister 
Emma in San Francisco. She was really a 
Lasell girl, and you know the old saying, 
'Once a Lasellian always a Lasellian'. She 
has been in educational work in San Francisco, 
has a sunny little apartment; and her home 



cooking is very good. I am returning to San 
Jose soon. Mrs. Ham (Pauline Collins) I 
saw at Saratoga in a beautiful villa. Her 
mother lives with her and the two children 
are a charming girl of fifteen or sixteen and 

the nicest little boy, as good as well, 

as a girl. He must be eleven. Harriet Sawyer 
Holden also has a charming daughter on the 
threshold of womanhood. She is living in 
Nappa, has a very fine husband and seems cor- 
respondingly happy, as happy as her sister 
Mabel is in the East. This is all the Lasell 
news I have, but I can never romance until 
it is time to go to sleep and it is now eleven 
A.M., and the sun is shining as brightly as 
if it were coming down on Pasadena. As for 
myself, last and not least in loyalty to Lasell, 
I began as you well know by teaching German 
and French — taught French during the war — 
French and German after it and it looks now 
as if I might end as I began. My dear Dr. 
Bragdon, I do not write often, but I think of 
you, of your dear ones, and your good work 
which will last forever. I think of your ever- 
widening circle of usefulness and so do the 
daughters, grand and great granddaughter of 
Lasell, God bless you." 

We close Dr. Bragdon's excerpts with this 
gracious word from the President of our La- 
sell Alumnae Association sent to him at the 
time of the California Reunion, — "I hope you 
are enjoying the best of health and that sun- 
ny California appreciates you half as much as 
Massachusetts misses you." 

Catherine Howe '22 and Laurestein Foster 
were among our latest and dearest "old girl" 
visitors. Laurestein is enjoying, as we knew 
this scholarly girl would, the advantages of 
Smith College, but every once in a while turns 
aside to visit Lasell and is always kind enough 
to declare her devotion still to our school. 
Catherine Howe spent her Eastern vacation 
in New England. She declares she is enjoy- 
ing immensely her work as assistant physical 
instructor at Penn Hall, Chambersburg, Pa. 
Certainly her looks verify her declaration. 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Somehow while Catherine was with us we 
all felt "well and happy". 

Dorothy Barnes '18 writes to our Prin- 
cipal from Los Angeles, first of all thanking 
him for the unique Christmas greeting, asks 
as to the dates of the coming Commencement 
festivities as she hopes to have a goodly com- 
pany of eighteeners back for their fifth an- 
niversary. We trust this efficient president 
to "put across" a successful reunion. 

Mrs. R. V. Meyer (Irene Wallace) brought 
to us the sad tidings of Edna Mai's sudden 
death, which occurred in the late fall. She 
was at the time on the way to Albuquerque, 
New Mexico, for the winter. 

We always expect a live wire message from 
Betty Stephens '20 and certainly she sent just 
that kind of a word to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, 
thanking them for their Christmas greeting 
and her appreciation of their kindness. She 
speaks of the lonesomeness of their summer 
camp since the passing of dear Martha Has- 
kell Clark '05, who summered at the same 
place. Betty was at home this winter for the 
first time in years and then and there tried 
successfully, her dietetic training. She writes, 
"I visited Caroline Lindsay Haney '20 re- 
cently and Richard is just the nicest baby 
ever. We sure did chatter about the days 
when we were all together at Lasell. I wish 
if you ever come to Rangeley you would hunt 

up npip l/'andy 

■*■ op * ■*-itchen, and if you 

ever come to Rumford you would not forget 

Betty Stephens". 

Norine Burroughs Dillingham '97 has just 
returned to Newton from a visit in her home 
town in Illinois. She writes : "I have been in 
Edwardsville, Illinois, to help my father and 
mother celebrate their golden wedding. I am 
sorry to have missed the mid-winter reunion, 
but will try to be on hand for the June Com- 
mencement time. I am enclosing another 
check from Anna P. Warner to be added to 
our 1897 Class Endowment Fund". 

Lois Nichols Arnold '18 writes: "We have 
a Lasell prospect in our family now, little Lois 
Lee Arnold, who arrived last May and when 
I come East this summer we hope to call at 



Lasell. In the fall we called on Miss Rand, 
who is at Hiram College, not far from our 
home." We will look for you, Lois, with that 
clear baby some fair summer day. 

Dear Katherine O'Brien, no one is more 
generous in sharing her special gift than this 
former Lasell girl. She came to us at our 
recent reception and sang a group of beautiful 
songs. We are glad to take this opportunity 
to express our appreciation of her kindness. 

Betty Stephens '20 paid a visit recently to 
Evelyn Madden Baker and together they came 
to Lasell. They looked the picture of health 
and happiness. 

The same day Helen Crawford '22 dropped 
in and the three girls lunched at their old 
school home. We were "mighty glad" to see 
them and did not let them go until they had 
promised to return at Commencement time. 
Louise Jackson '22 literally ran in and out 
again. We could not forgive the shortness of 
her stay had she not promised to come later 
and stay longer. 

Florence Louise Myers has recently re- 
turned from her unusual and splendid service 
in the Near East Relief work. Through one 
of the secretaries of the Y. W. C. A. we 
learned that she was in New York, and sent 
post haste an invitation for her to "come 
home" and tell us all about her relief work ; 
but unfortunately, although we sent the let- 
ter by special delivery it did not reach her 
until she had returned to her home in Hins- 
dale, 111. She writes, "You were nice to ask 
me to talk to the girls at Lasell and had I 
been coming to Boston I should have done so 
gladly. Please remember me to Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow and any others I may know." We 
trust Florence will enjoy her well-deserved 
furlough. 

Dear Dorothy Burnham '20 has evidently 
had for her motto "Forward" for, although 
she was graduated but three years ago, she is 
now assisting in correcting English papers in 
the State University Extension work. 

Ruth Hay den '20 and Kathryn Ladd '21 
recently paid us a visit. We were all very 
glad to see them. 




^-a £ 




"Write a poem," it's easy to say, 

But it takes a long, long time ; 
And somehow I never can seem to make 

The second and fourth lines rhyme. 

For hours I sit at my desk and think, 

Then write down a line or two, 
But hurriedly scratch them out because 

They never seem quite to do. 

Four lines I've written, just what do they mean? 

Not a single thing to me ; 
How Longfellow wrote such hundreds of them 

Is more than I can see. 

A dream I've had in mind for years, — 

I aspired a poet to be ; 
But now I've changed my mind, I fear 

The task is too hard for me. 

"Write a poem." Yes ! it's easy to say 
But it takes such a long, long time. 

Yet I do declare I've juggled the words 

'Til the second and fourth lines rhyme. 

Louise Straits, '24. 



He — "Why is 'because' a woman's reason ?' 
She— "Because." 



A green little boy, 

In a green little way, 

A green little apple devoured one day! 

And the green little grasses now tenderly wave 

O'er the green little apple boy's green little grave. 



"What is the difference between restrictions 
and an aching tooth?" 

"One requires mental, the other dental, at- 
tention." 



FOR THOSE WHO WALK IN DARKNESS 

"What's this Lamp they're always talking- 
about?" 

"Say, haven't you ever heard of modern 
Lit. ?" 



"What became of that pin?" 
"The last I saw of it, it was pointed one 
way and headed, the other." 



I woke to look upon a face 

Silent, white, and cold 
Oh ! friend, the agony I felt 

Can never half be told. 

We'd lived together but a year, 

How terrible to see 
Those gentle hands outstretched and still, 

That toiled so hard for me. 

My waking thoughts had been of one 
Who now to sleep had dropped, 

'Twas hard to realize, oh, friend, 
My Ingersoll had stopped. 



She thinks of dropping Latin, 
All of her friends concur. 

For knowing her, they quite agree, 
One tongue's enough for her. 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



When the clock struck twelve the other 
night, Father came to the head of the stair- 
way and in rather a loud voice asked, "Young 
man, is your self starter out of order?" 

"It doesn't matter," retorted the young 
man, "so long as there is a crank in the 
house." 



"What are the lower classes?" 
"The ones that get the upper berths in the 
Pullman sleepers." 



First Junior — "Did you get the second 
question in arithmetic?" 

Second Junior — "No." 

First Junior — "How far were you from the 
correct answer ?" 

Second Junior — "Five seats." 



"Say, if I planted an electric light bulb, 
what sort of thing would sprout?" 
"Current bushes, probably." 



"Why are shoes always seen in pairs?' 

"Dunno." 

"Because each has a sole-mate." 



There was a ycung lady named Trounce 
Who really weighed many an ounce 

She neglected her lessons 

For the delicatessens 
And for this she got the grand bounce. 



Pinkie— "What's the trouble?" 

J. T. — "Modern History. I have to pre- 
pare a table of the rulers. It's all right as a 
'Senior sport,' but I personally have given it 
up." 



"Cicero certainly had some line." 
"I'll say— Cataline." 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



mm^mmmm 



-:;.-■ BAKER'S * 

CAR A CASi.S W.E ET 

CHOC'OLATE 



SUB 




3£ MAD E BY ./'«. -v 
.WALTER-BAKER, & CO. LTD, 

T>OHCHE5TER>MAS5. 



M 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate i3 very sustaining, 
C3 it contains more nourishment 
t.ian the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER 8l CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



A, T\ ADDY M cjACR'S 



MASKS 
FAVORS 
PUZZLES 
NOISE MAKERS 
NOVELTY BALLOONS 
NOVELTY PAPER HATS 
ETC 



Boston Joke,Trick.& N.ovelty Company "^^ • 
22 BromfieIdSt:-Boston9,Mass 



Clever Joker Novelties. 

Dance. Dinner and Party Favors. 

Your Special Party Colors inFavois toOrder 

Holiday Specialty Favors InTheip Season 



BOSTON JOKER 
DRIBBLE GLASS 
BUZZER LETTER 
MAPSHMALLOW-SNAKE 
. COMIC COOK BOOK 

COMIC PLACE CARDS 
MIMSTRE.L JOKE BOOK 
ETC. 



26 LASELL LEAVES 



THE VALLEY RANCH 




BRAND 

HORSEBACK TRIP IN THE ROCKIES 
FOR YOUNG LADIES 

The party leaves New York in private Pullmans on June 30th, arriving in Cody, Wyoming, 
on July 4th for a day of the famous Cody Stampede, an exhibition of the days of the Old West. 

From this point a forty day saddle and trail trip commences through Yellowstone National 
Park, Jackson's Hole, and the Wyoming Big Game Country, returning to Valley Ranch for a 
few days' visit and the Ranch Roundup before returning East. 

The party is on the go all the time through the most beautiful, interesting, and picturesque 
wild country of America. Seven weeks of solid fun and enjoyment. 

From a Recreational and Educational standpoint this trip can not be duplicated. 

For catalogue giving full information, address: 

JULIAN S. BRYAN, Director 

Valley Ranch Eastern Headquarters 

2044 Grand Central Terminal, 70 East 45th Street, New York 

Telephone Vanderbilt 2335 

FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




ax 



Brothers 



TtoWSTS 

t&\\rx\tt Smsra, liolpta an* (irrljt&fi 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 

CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



27 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 



FOR 



REAL SERVICE 



Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Chatter 
and Russell's Chocolates 



A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 



BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Aubumdale 



A FRIEND 



Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 



HOTEL SUPPLIES 



57 and 58 N. Market St. 



Boston 



STUDENTS! 

WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 

SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 

THINK OF 




THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 



PEMBERTON l7j SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 



L P. Hollander Co. 



Established 1848 



NEW ATTRACTIVE 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 



202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 I l o South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 






QUALITY 




mMf SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



O. S. REED 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waltham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

That is always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH, 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 

perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 

Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON. MASS. 
Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 

Inc. 

FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 

364 BoylstOn Street ArlingtonStreet 
Established 1858 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



T.E 



SMART 



J647)f nosfcLEY ( ri9Jil 



•Q» 



WALKING 

SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Randy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 

ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON. Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., 

Telephone Rich. 820 



Boston 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Recipe 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 
78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 

tone quality and scientific adjustment. 
Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H Huot, Treas. E. J. Monetise, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURN DALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



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i _ ii Y ',»!'^ : *' 




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<soin>iD><sll" 



THE ISLAND CAMP FOR GIRLS 

For Booklet address Mrs. Charles F. Towne 
Lasell Seminary, Auburndale 66, Mass. 




LASELL LEAVES 



New York 
394 Fifth Aw. 



Boston 

161 Tremont St. 
164 Tremont St. 



Philadelphia 
1311 Walnut St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



SEASONABLE and REASONABLE 

GIFTS 



1 8 inches 

24 

27 

30 

36 

48 

60 




Prices 
$3.00 
up to 
$100 



IMITATION PEARL NECKLACES 




WRIST WATCHES 
$ 1 8.00 in Gold Filled $30.00 in Solid Gold 

$100.00 with Diamonds 




11 fiolesale , »' 1 ReL 

UEWELERd 



39«4I 

SUMMER ST 
BOSTON 

HUT DOM 

C.M«£Y4«ft 



F. F. DAVIDSON 



F. F. DAVIDSON. Jr. 





Vol. XXXXVIII 



No. 6 



MAY, 1923 



LASELL LEAVES 



£>ag it tmtlj 3\tmttB 




(Eijarg* arrmntia aoltrtt^ 



LASELL LEAVES 



Scientific Cold Storage for Furs 

Furs last longer when subjected to expert blown air process 
of cleaning, and then kept in dry cold storage vaults during 
the warmer months. Telephone to us — or send a 
postal — and one of our representatives will call for Furs 
or other goods you wish to have stored. 

Our Cold Storage Equipment is second to none — Our 
Reputation is back of our Assurance of Satisfaction 

The cost is but 3% of a reasonable valuation, including 

cleaning and insuring. 



Jord 



an Marsh Company 



Boston 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



A specialty store that is 
ideally fitted to satisfy the 
apparel wants of the college 
girl. Everything here is 
authentic in style and de- 
pendable in service. 



E. T. Slattery Co. 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




Oldest Rug House 
in America 



m 



Linoleum Time Is 
This Is Linoleum 



EVERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. 
The same applies to offices and public places in general. 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. 
There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 

An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the floor. This you may 
entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



t% f*A WAllTy 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



Basell Leaves 

Vol. XXXXVIII LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., MAY, 1923 No. 6 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 

LASELL LEAVES STAFF '23 AND '24 

Editor-in-Chief Business Editor 

JOCELYN TONG EMMA SMITH 

Assistant Literary Editor 

ESTHER PALMER 

Local Editors 
Assistant Editor ANNA H£NDEE 

HELEN SCHROER ^ ^.^ ELIZABETH NOWELL 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 
MARIA PARRY 

Literary Editor Athletic Editor 

DORIS WOODRUFF EDITH HADLEY 

TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 

CONTENTS 

LITERARY 

Modern Fiction L Markert 4 

The Crime of Sylvester Bonnard H - Chapman 

The Cathedral Mary Ann Miller 5 

Chinese Chinoiseries ........ 

Kilauea. B. Novell 12 

Dreams Mary Ann Miller 12 

Eventide M. Saunders 13 

EDITORIAL 14 

ENDOWMENT PLEDGES 15 

LOCALS 17 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 21 

PERSONALS ' " 24 

29 

JOKES 



v>^ 




MODERN FICTION 

It sometimes seems difficult to recognize 
a real distinction between two periods of 
literature because there is usually so gradual 
a transition from the one into the other. 
And then too, we discover the same charac- 
teristics with only shades of difference. 
However, there are certain changes which 
come in the approach of the writer to the 
reader and in the methods and purposes of 
authors. 

The chief purpose of the Victorian Age 
was to moralize. Writers saw the serious 
side of life and tried to depict it in such a 
way as to draw some lesson from the stories 
presented. People were awaking to even a 
deeper knowledge than during the Roman- 
tic Period, of democracy, social equality, 
liberty, and of arts and sciences. Because 
people were striving for these things, much 
more attention was paid to the matter of 
education in order that coming generations 
might become better citizens and more in- 
telligent participants in the world's affairs. 
It is true, this was an age of doubt and 
questioning and people seemed less opti- 
mistic than they appear to be today ; the 
evolution of science would explain the basic 
reason for such a tendency. Therefore we 
find prose and poetry writers alike seeking 
to explain things and to find some source 
for them. This led to moralizing; but most 
of the doubting and pessimism resulted in 
a happier and firmer faith than one might 
anticipate in the light of the earlier con- 
fusion. 

Modern-day writing seems like a transi- 
tion period which is leading to a finely de- 



veloped modern school of writing. Today 
realism is the key-word. But somehow we 
do not get at the truth in the right way, 
particularly in the novel. There is so much 
superficial depicting of the baser motives, 
of the less noble qualities in man. There 
is an endeavor to discover the truth but we 
have not yet reached the core of the prob- 
lem. There is a spiritual earnestness, a de- 
sire to discover the spiritual forces at work 
in the world, an acknowledgment that there 
is a divine power back of everything; but 
we seem to find no real solution for the 
disturbances. It would appear that readers 
expect to have their attention held without 
much effort in order that they may be en- 
tertained with up-to-date presentation of 
life, a picture much too often far from ideal. 
We are forced to admit that there is little 
depth and that we feel dissatisfied when 
the book is finished, even though our hopes 
may have surged high during the reading 
of portions of it. Many times we tire of the 
reading long before the conclusion is reach- 
ed ; often we are too impatient to "wade 
through" much meaningless nothing and so 
we simply hurry over enough of the story to 
find out its plot and its ending. Sometimes 
we are told that a book is "the best seller 
and the best written book of the year." 
Perhaps there is something radically wrong 
with us because we fail to appreciate such 
literary value. So while the fiction of the 
present day may fascinate us and hold 
momentary interest, yet we must place the 
major portion of current novels in the class 
of "light reading." 

Ida Markert. 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE CRIME OF SYLVESTER BONNARD 

Anatole France 

In "The Crime of Sylvester Bonnard" we 
find a character so delightfully genuine and 
so filled with love for his world that it is 
a joy to meet him. His world is bounded by 
the four walls of his home which are bul- 
warks of books and manuscripts ; the at- 
mosphere about his universe is Paris and 
the Seine and the suburban forests. Stars in 
his firmament are people and objects that 
he loves. His relation to them is so sweet 
and generous, his devotion so unselfish that 
they impress us not as passions of his life, 
but as consecrations of his years. He has 
a tender regard for others ; the mother of 
the new-born child in the attic, the young 
orphan in her unfortunate circumstances, 
and the fire-side cat are all recipients of his 
generosity. He seems to live without 
malice, in serenity, but not without color, 
for his life is anything but drab. His de- 
light and satirical wink at the fresh eager- 
ness of youth and his faith in the old, are 
as typical of the bachelor as is his absent- 
mindedness, his horror of spinsters and his 
love of good viands. He shows an utter 
disregard, even ignorance of law and con- 
vention when his principles of right and 
wrong are being violated. 

The old man clings to life and we are 
glad because he is good to life and it is, 
to him. Because he has the resources of a 
philosophic mind and the fancy, imagination 
and appreciation of the incessant reader, 
even the most familiar sights, incidents and 
sounds are subjects of new comparison, 
wells for new creative thought and bring 
in a flash, the joys of youth and former days. 

Thus we see him, in reverie or conversa- 
tion through his diary, so intimately written 
that we feel as though we were eaves- 
dropping. We see him sitting at his fire 
or on the banks of the Seine, viewing the 
harmony of his colorful life ; and forgetting 
our lives of rush and confusion we catch this 



glimpse of enjoyment and envy him whole 
heartedly, his life content with his world. 

Helen Chapman. 



THE CATHEDRAL 

By Hugh Walpole. 

Who can read "The Cathedral" without 
bowing in deference before Hugh Walpole's 
talent ? He so cleverly weaves the plot, plans 
■ the destruction of the Archdeacon, and reveals 
to the reader the character of his opponent, 
Canon Ronder, so vividly pictures the little 
town with its petty gossip and enthusiasm too 
readily swayed, and over it all casts the domi- 
nant shadow of the Cathedral that the book is 
one of powerful force. 

As the story moves toward the climax you 
are irresistibly carried along half against your 
will, dreading the inevitable tragic outcome. 
In a sense, however, the ending is not tragic ; 
the prolonging of Brandon's life could have 
been a benefit to no one and his death was 
indeed a blessing for his daughter. But your 
svmpathies are changed and twisted and you 
are always conscious of the overhanging 
majestic Cathedral. You love it for its beauty, 
you hate and fear it for its domination, but, 
you never once are allowed to forget it. 

You can fairly see the Archdeacon, once so 
confident and strong, crumble and degenerate 
into a man of floundering wits and of no 
physical strength. I know of nothing more 
pitiful in fiction than this man, who had once 
thought himself on a par with God, losing him- 
self, faltering, hesitating and finally falling. 
I do not mean that I sanction his attitude; 
he was utterly wrong to be so self-centered, 
but when I stop to consider the mental agony 
he suffered and the staggering blow to his 
pride, it seems so pitiable. 

Then, too, he was not personally conceited, 
he seemed as innocent as a child in his mis- 
taken ideas. He believed himself superior 
through no merit of his own but only as a 
perfect human being so created by God. He 
truly believed that in all his actions he was 



6 



LASELL LEAVES 



serving his Maker and when his charge was 
taken from him and people whom he had 
looked down upon from his lofty position 
hated him, he was stunned by the shock. 

When he realized how wrong he had been 
and how thoughtless, he tried to make amends 
to his neglected wife, but it was too late, for 
he had also incurred her hatred. 

She fought a valiant fight. In her drab, 
cold, useless existence she tried in vain to 
reach the heart of her son, but he like his 
father had learned to disregard her. 

The son, Falk, had a high-strung active 
temperament and the courage of his convic- 
tions. He wrote the details of his runaway 
marriage and future plans rather than tell 
them because he dreaded to see the hurt ex- 
pression he knew it would bring to his father's 
face. 

And there was the daughter, Joan. Her 
world was narrow but happy until respon- 
sibility made a woman of her. She lived un- 
noticed by her family, not blaming them, but 
thinking herself to be unattractive and dull. 
Suddenly she is admired and all her thoughts 
center on this new love. She craves to do 
something for her family, no matter how small, 
if she can only feel as though she had some 
aim or importance in life. Finally when the 
Archdeacon is crying aloud for comfort, when 
he is alone and strange, Joan is ready to meet 
his every need, to sacrifice her own happiness 
that she may be of service to him. She de- 
fends him and has a burning hatred for his 
enemies, chief among these is Canon Ronder. 

When Ronder first came to the village of 
Polchester, Brandon reigned supreme. No one 
dared oppose his word or action. His mascu- 
line beauty and unswerving decisions had 
held sway for years, and he was "strutting 
in his pride." The world was a fair place to 
him, his life was complete, God was good. He 
was master of the Cathedral, and superior to 
all men. But with Ronder's coming all things 
changed. By his crafty wit and art of reading 
character he soon won the hearts of the 
villagers and the applause of the Church au- 



thority. He caused a gradual but sure under- 
mining of Brandon's power. He managed 
things in so cold-blooded a manner that every- 
thing that stood in the way of his success 
must be banished, regardless of circumstances. 
At times he believed he felt sorrow for certain 
deeds, but at these times he was not true to 
himself. Every action, every thought had as 
a motive his betterment. Brandon recognized 
in Ronder his opponent, and attributed to him 
all the blame for his misfortunes. Was Ron- 
der really the cause or was it, as the drunken 
artist hinted, the mysterious force of the 
Cathedral, outraged with this human who 
dared believe he had mastered it? 

In the final struggle for dictatorship over 
a church matter Brandon lost. He was crush- 
ed in his defeat, for he had not fully realized 
before, his waning authority. He cried aloud 
that God was being betrayed, but the others 
knew it as but the raving of his shattered 
mind. He rose to leave, with something of 
his old dignity, but staggered and fell among 
his enemies. His son had failed him, his wife 
had failed him, his God had failed him, and 
at last his heart failed him too. 

So we are left to contemplate the work 
of the Cathedral — that enduring edifice that 
crushes anything if it dare to assume power 
over its towering greatness and solemnity. 

Mary Ann Miller. 



CHINESE CHINOISERIES 

FOREWORD 

To a Chinese Coolie : 

"If those grim artisans in other lands 
Who fret and shirk .... 
Dropping their chosen tools from 
listless hands, 
Could see you work !" 



"A CARAVAN FROM CHINA CAME" 
One of the popular fads in literature is 
Chinese poetry, although it does not savor of 
the spectacular by which the public is most 
often caught. Instead we have found it to 
be so subtle that it will elude many. 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



In presenting" "Fir-Flower-Tablets," Amy 
Lowell gives us a rare treat, having gathered 
the frail stuffs out of which Chinese poetry is 
made. Unique in color and design, equipped 
with alluring notes of authentic theme, it is 
full also of the purely imaginative that has 
the "tang" of the real Chinese Art with the 
rich setting of its ancient literature. 

Miss Lowell's verses have vim and pungency 
about them : they pervade our senses ; paint 
live, colorful pictures. Though the subjects 
may seem at times fantastic, they must stir 
our imaginations and make us visualize the 
beauty and glory of China's share in world 
literature. 

Sylvia C. Starr. 



*Nita: 

Impish black eyes ; 

And coal black hair, 

Cut in bangs 

That are stringy, 

And always in her eyes ; 

Dirty hands ; 

And no shoes 

At all; 

A make-shift dress, 

Gaudy beads — 

Gold, scarlet, black — 

Coal black 

To match her eyes ; 

A chin with a tilt, 

A funny mouth 

That sputters 

Her only 

Precious 

American word 

f'AIlo-keed !" 
*A Chinese baby-friend of mine. 
t(Hello kid) 

Mary M. DeWolf. 



Myriads of Temples : 

With their curving eaves and gleaming yellow-tiled 

roofs 
In beauty of line and brilliancy of color unexcelled ; 
Each holding long memories of past glories. 

The gray doves are cooing beneath the carvings of 

the colored eaves ; 
Within, kneeling before the monster idols, 
Priests and worshippers are enshrouded in thick 

incense 
Which is burning in faded green hars, before the 

sacred images. 



From ruler to beggar come gifts of gold. 

That these holy sanctuaries may be upheld or re- 
stored ; 

From far and near 

The same devout spirit of ancestral worship all- 
pervading. 

The refuge of the traveler, 
Yes, even the weary wayfarer, 
Regardless of race or creed, 
Never fails to find welcome. 



Helen Schr, 



oer, 



The China that lies dormant now, 
Worshipping its past, 
Seems like a silent Sphinx 

To us — 
Who do not understand, 
We think its smiling Buddhas strange— 
Who do not understand. 
The writhing dragons are bizarre 
But still this old pagodad land, 
Like everything, 
That has a past, 
Has all the future, too. 

Sylvia Starr. 



Temples of marble laboriously wrought, 
Carved with images, be jeweled with thought 
Tablets of bronze preserving traditions, 
Alluring, mystic;, symbolic of ages. 

Dorothy Redman. 



China ! Golden and purple, 
Deep in misty traditions, 
Incense and stately altars inside, 
Frail white blossoms without. 

Elizabeth Anderson. 



An Enchanting Land ! 

Pink petals floating gently through the air, 

Clear crystal water bubbling over pebbles, 

The soft note of the birds, 

And outside a coolie passes, 

Bent with his load of rice. 

Catherine Brown. 



The sun has set on the hillside, 

The valleys are growing dim, 

And now the waters are gently flowing 

In the old Hwangho River. 

Alice McCaghey. 



There is a land far away : 

A land of golden hours; 

A country of myths, 

Which harbors a philosophical race; 

A country of future-mansion builders ; 

A pleasure-loving group ; 

Prideful, dignified. 

A people who possess individual liberty; 

A delightful nation indeed. 

Ah!" Where is that beautiful land 

Of smiling cherry blossoms, 

That Oriental feast of dreams? 

Isabel Varney. 



* 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



The clouds are laden with color: 
Mist, lavender, and gold tint the sky. 
The crystal lake is redundant with its hues. 
The solitary boatman rows his battered craft, 
Weird, battered, viking-prowed. 
In slender silhouette, the Jade Fourtain Pagoda, 
A lonely sentinel, points ever heavenward. 
Alone it stands. Once rulers and emperors wor- 
shipped at its shrine. 
But that is gone. It is as solitary as the boatman 
With memories alone of past glories. 



The color fades, 
Shadows of darkness fall- 
All is dark. 



C. Vicary. 



Over the hills and mountains, 

Winding its way through the valleys, 

Grim, 

Forbidding, 

Unrelenting, 

Having taken its toll of human life, 

It stands there — 

The Great Wall of China. Peggy Hall. 



During the long, still night, 

Moonbeams shyly peep through white clouds, 

Covering the damp land 

With a mystic blanket of chilling dew. 

A cool wind blows, 

Bringing the odor of wistaria. 

Clmrlotte Sims. 



A land so fair to human eye : 

Such beauty, such glory, such absolute harmony 

As Shantung — the Eastern paradise : 

The bloom in profusion, and rarest of colors, 

Blossoms of marvelous sweetness ; 

The golden moon swinging from heaven, 

Sheds its splendor in radiant beams 

On this, the earth's masterpiece ! 

Discordant Chinese melodies. 

Gods of rarest Chinese jade; 

Softly padded feet ; 

Prayers 

Offered by a trusting race. Lucile Norris. 



TO A CHINESE BOY AND GIRL 

The Chinese boy — small and almond-eyed, 

In satin garments and little fibre shoes, 

Walks down the narrow road, watching the people. 

The Chinese girl — tiny — with little feet, 

Her silken hair drawn in a tight knot, 

Shuffles through the streets, unnoticed, unheeded. 

The Chinese boy watches the Chinese girl 
Until she slowly lifts her eyes, 
Then the Chinese girl blushes with shame, 
And shuffles on again. 

The Chinese girl watches the Chinese boy 

As he struts along the road. 

The Chinese boy turns and looks at the Chinese girl, 

But she shyly bows her head. 

M. L. Chase. 



INSIDIOUS INTRIGUE 

Is it strange that a province holding the 
commercial and industrial position which 
Shantung possesses should be much coveted 
by other nations? 

Although it is true that in 1897 two Ger- 
man missionaries were murdered in Shan- 
tung, 'twas but a pretext for German inva- 
sion : this affair offered the Germans a long- 
hoped-for opportunity ; her war-ships were 
stationed in the harbor and by this move- 
ment succeeded in frightening the simple, 
unsuspecting Chinese, and in seizing the im- 
portant province. 

The Kaiser was much ridiculed for this 
act, even in Germany : A German Socialist 
newspaper published a satirical picture of 
the Kaiser saying, "If only my missionaries 
hold out, I may become Master of China." 



HEAR YE, OH, HEAR YE! 

One looks at the cold stars overhead, at 
the infinite void around him : it is almost 
incredible that all this emptiness should be 
vibrant with human thought and emotion ; 
the wonder grows when we consider the 
millions that hear the distant voice at the 
same time, and that half a continent is con- 
verted into a huge auditorium. 

Radio in its broadcasting aspect is a 
powerful instrument of appeal to the masses 
even signalizing its own immense advan- 
tages over the telephone, the telegraph, the 
steamship and the railway for molding 
Oriental opinion. Its closest competitors 
are the newspapers and the motion pictures, 
but even those it promises to eclipse simply 
by the numbers that are simultaneously af- 
fected. Radio surpasses the most ruthlessly 
flamboyant newspaper, because it is alive ; 
its dullest reports win interest because they 
come directly from human lips. 

To the Oriental and other races mystical- 
ly inclined, the radio will be less astonishing 
than it is to us : the belief in thought trans- 
ference is there more deeply rooted ; and 



LASELL LEAVES 



transmitters and receivers will seem but 
the means of communicating mentalities. 

Radio broadcasting may even compel the 
Orient to learn one of the major European 
languages. Speech has already been trans- 
mitted by radio between Arlington, Vir- 
ginia, and Honolulu and between Washing- 
ton and Eiffel Tower. When broadcasting 
becomes more pliable but little power will 
be required to project the voice of Einstein 
or Sir Oliver Lodge or the President of the 
United States to the furthermost parts of 
the earth. 

Remembering that the potentialities of 
radio broadcasting lie in mass appeal, we 
naturally inquire what its social effect will 
be in the Orient. Similar changes will be 
wrought as were brought about in Europe 
by the invention of printing, steam locomo- 
tion and electrical means of communication. 

Communication means organization : ra- 
dio, particularly in its broadcasting aspects, 
will prove to be the most potent unifying 
influence that has appeared since the rail- 
way and the telegraph were invented ; im- 
proved communication means the breaking 
down of language barriers. 

The Japanese now have one of the most 
powerful radio units in the world at Har- 
anomachi, the receiving station, and Tomio- 
ka, the sending station. No doubt it will 
drive home the Japanese point of view to 
millions on the mainland. Six radio broad- 
casting stations will do more to secure the 
hold of the Japanese on northern China 
than six armies. We have only to think 
of the world effect produced by President 
Wilson's expositions of democratic ideals, 
dropped behind the German lines during the 
war, to realize what an astute Japanese 
government can do with radio in molding 
Chinese thought and opinion. 

The development of radio in the Orient 
is so inextricably bound up with interna- 
tional politics, treaty rights, spheres of in- 
terest, leases and concessions that it will 
take more than one Conference of the 



Powers to clear up the muddle: with China, 
the Japanese and the principal western 
governments have done very much as they 
pleased, with little regard for China's sov- 
ereign rights. 

China is threatened with a swarm of small 
and large competing radio companies. At 
the instance of Elihu Root and Senator 
Underwood a resolution was finally adopt- 
ed which expressed the view that the radio 
stations, erected by legations, were merely 
"suffered" by the Chinese Government, and 
that China had not surrendered her right 
to demand their removal or transference to 
herself. 

The Chinese government, realizing its 
own inability to erect a station sufficiently 
powerful, has contracted with the Radio 
Corporation of America and the Federal 
Telegraph Company of California to pro- 
vide adequate facilities for radio communi- 
cation. 

The stations are to be completed in two 
or three years. With powerful broadcast- 
ing stations of its own, directed by educated 
natives, China will in turn attempt to reach 
out to European and American minds. And 
by this projection of thought the abyss that 
now separates the Orient from the Occi- 
dent will be bridged. In radio lies the 
realization of a world point of view. 

What may not the West learn from the 
East when radio becomes a medium of in- 
tercontinental communication ! The temple 
bells of the East — who knows but we may 
hear them in Chicago ; whatever the Orient 
can translate into the spoken Word or into 
music, the West will hear; it will then 
learn to understand something of the emo- 
tional and intellectual life of a mystical and 
mighty civilization ; there will be a meeting 
of minds through eloquent voice instead of 
by cold impersonal type. 

And whole nations shall give to "her' > 
audience. 

Alice E. McCaghey. 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



CLASHING CYMBALS 

"The smallest worm will turn if trod- 
den on," says the proverb: for a century or 
two the world's faith in the proverb has 
been shaken; it saw the mighty dragon, 
symbol of China, trampled upon by one 
nation after another with scarcely a stir on 
her part; the cruelties inflicted upon her 
seemed to have dazed her into unconscious- 
ness. 

But men of vision have feared her awak- 
ening: "China is a sleeping giant," said 
Napoleon, "wake her not, for, once awake 
she will move the world." She is awake, 
although it has taken her a long time to 
arouse herself. Large bodies not only move 
slowly, but also waken slowly. After they 
are once aroused, the world is aware of 
their being awake. 

In fact during these last ten years, China 
has become very much alive ; having leaped, 
in a single bound, from extreme autocracy 
to modern democracy is surely no sign of 
a nation in its death-throes ; when within 
her cities and towns, along the coast and 
in the interior, we behold her teeming 
masses of sturdy, industrious, frugal, in- 
telligent people, part of the four hundred 
millions that comprise the nation, four-fifths 
of the entire yellow race, nearly one-fourth 
of the population of the whole earth, we 
seem, indeed, to see the giant of whom 
Napoleon spoke, which, in the not far dis- 
tant future, will doubtless be able to move 
the world. 

Everywhere we see her preparing her- 
self for that future ; her schools crowded 
with eager learners, ranging in age from 
childhood to maturity ; her railroads, tele- 
graphs, and telephones stretching in all 
directions ; factories converting large masses 
of her inexhaustible natural resources into 
products for the world's mart. 

While other nations have been making a 
specialty of the pursuit of warfare, China 
has cultivated the arts of peace. Her civil- 
ization reaches back farther than that of any 



other nation now in existence. There was 
a time many years ago when China was the 
foremost country in the world : she invented 
paper and ink, and the art of printing; she 
was the first to produce porcelain, silk and 
lacquer; the first to make a science of agri- 
culture ; the first to introduce irrigation and 
cold storage; she invented the compass; 
discovered gunpowder ; introduced the deci- 
mal system ; and furthermore produced the 
first encyclopedia ever known. Thus we see 
that China had her "Golden Age." 

In her guilelessness she placed no ob- 
stacles to the coming of the European mis- 
sionary. Sad as has proved the treatment 
which China received at the hands of the 
Germans, that which she suffered at the 
hands of Japan has been the most cruel of 
all : the smallness of her own area, and the 
vastness of that of China ; the fertility of 
the soil ; the varied climate ; the wealth of 
her mines ; the safety of her spacious and 
land-locked harbors, incited Japan's greed. 
Having, under European tuition, fast be- 
come a military power, and being situated 
close by, she could easily gratify that greed. 
Accordingly she waged cruel war against 
China and inflicted upon her a defeat so 
crushing that, but for the interference of 
certain European nations, she would have 
annexed all of China to her own territory, 
as she annexed the Peninsula of Korea. 

The World War proved another ordeal 
to China : no sooner had it started than 
Japan joined the Allies, invaded the Prov- 
ince of Shantung, which Germany had ex- 
tracted from China ; next, knowing that the 
Allies could not afford to break with her 
during the critical days of the war, Japan 
forced upon China what are known as "The 
Twenty-one Demands," to (which China, 
under threat of immediate war, was obliged 
to agree, and which, but for the loud out- 
cry on the part of the United States and 
other nations, would have reduced China to 
the condition of a vassal to Japan. 

After all these wrongs, China, under the 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



pressure of Japan, was made to enter the 
World War, while Japan busied herself only 
with stirring up trouble between Northern 
and vSouthern China, with the aid of Japan- 
ese gold. 

In vain China tried to get a hearing at 
the Paris Peace Conference : the representa- 
tive of Japan was one of the Council of 
Five, who dominated the Conference. A 
little better fate awaited her at the Con- 
ference at Washington at which a way was 
opened by President Harding for her to 
speak to all the world. She has spoken and 
has been heard ; she has submitted to the 
world her "Bill of Rights" ; she has made 
her "Declaration of Independence" ; she has 
pronounced her "Ten Commandments," and 
asked for the right of sovereignty over her 
own land and people; she has asked for a 
restoration to her of what is her own. She 
has asked for nullification or rectification of 
all grants, treaties, pledges, leases, privi- 
leges, that were extorted from her. 

During the World War, when Japan laid her 
claim on Shantung, the question as to whom 
it rightly belonged became national. There- 
fore the province was designated as one of 
the problems which should be solved by the 
Peace Conference, at the conclusion of 
which, on the noon of December 10, 1922, 
the province of Shantung was restored to 
China. 

People are beginning to realize that 
China, rich in all things needed by man- 
kind, if treated justly, can be of infinitely 
greater benefit to the nations of the earth 
than when trampled under foot. She is no 
longer asleep. She is wide awake. She 
is no longer weak. She is growing stronger 
each day. Her day of self -emancipation is 
at hand. The ills from which Chinese are said 
to be suffering are vastly exaggerated ; the 
remedy is within the grasp of their intelli- 
gence and the power of initiative is almost 
within their control. 

Arlene E. Longee. 



VALES AND VISIONS 

Let us think for a while in a lighter vein 
and turn from the restlessness and troubles 
of China. 

It is said that people are affected by their 
surroundings. Who would be able to resist 
the appealing atmosphere of a Chinese gar- 
den, with delicate wistaria hanging from the 
branches of the trees and the narrow flower- 
bordered paths, miniature artificial lakes ly- 
ing beneath the shade of the mulberry or 
maple trees, and odd little rockeries en- 
circling it? In these fascinating places, all 
beauty, place a tiny Chinese lady, dressed 
in sapphire blue and yellow satin, making 
a striking and brilliant spot against the pale 
background of the garden. We may then 
account for the reason that so many of the 
Chinese poets write about rivers, flowers, 
gardens, and ladies. 

There is no nation in the world which 
is fonder of its gardens and flowers than 
quaint China. These Oriental people spend 
much of their time in their gardens and each 
home has its own shrine usually set in the 
center of a lovely garden. On both sides of 
the paths leading to the altar, one can see 
cherry-trees laden with their fragrant blos- 
soms forming a wonderful setting for the 
odd-shaped, stone shrine. 

Their little low gray houses are grouped 
together and every one is well acquainted 
with the affairs of his neighbor. Many 
small structures of quaint design are erected 
in the gardens. The lives that the people 
themselves have led for centuries account 
for many of these curious things. The most 
frequently seen are the "lous" : one may 
not call them summer-houses, nor pavilions, 
nor cupolas but a little of all three com- 
bined. 

In this land of rare loveliness, walls and 
fences are unknown, the various properties 
being divided merely by low ridges or hills. 

Each country provides for a similar place 
where its people may sit and enjoy the won- 
ders of nature, but none can quite compare 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



with the exquisite beauty and oddity of 
these Oriental structures which have always 
meant so much to the Chinese people. 

Katharine C. Webb. 



ENVOI 



". . . better to go silently 

To yon bridge-high trysting place, 

Where, in silence for a space, 

You may look with upturned face 

On the face of Beauty, reading 

From her lips, and learning, heeding 

That, beyond the compassings 

Of teakwood toys and glistening things 

Shine those rarer, fairer themes — 

Of Love, and Life, and Dreams. — " 



KILAUEA 

Early one morning as we left the Volcano 
House, on the island of Hawaii, we stood for 
some time on the outer brink of one of the 
most active and interesting volcanoes in the 
world. Above, the great cliffs of black lava 
projected like huge walls ; the bottom seemed 
miles below us ; far off near the horizon gray 
clouds of smoke curled skyward. 

Quickly we began our descent, but it was 
an hour or more before we finally reached our 
first destination. The ground was covered 
with hard black lava that crumbled beneath 
our feet. Painted white stones marked the 
rough path and stood out like desolate beings 
lost in a desert. For miles around no trees 
grew ; all we could see was the black, rough 
lava. Soon we reached the real edge. About 
three yards down, an immense fire of brilliant, 
red-hot lava boiled gayly. The fountains as 
they broke through the thin half -cooled crust 
made a rumbling roar like the distant sound 
of thunder. "Crash! Crash!" it went against 
the sides of the pit. Now and then as the 
hot lava dug its way under the ledges, huge 
pieces of the cliffs surrounding the pit fell in 
with a tremendous crash and were submerged 
almost immediately. The incessant roaring 
nearly deafened us, but the magnificent color- 
ing and fascination of the wonderful miracle 
held us spellbound. Slowly the great mass of 
red moved in circles around the pit, then all 



would be covered with the thin black crust 
until the boiling came to such a point that 
geysers broke through and leaped high in the 
air carrying with them thin blue lines of 
smoke. These fountains played for about 
ten minutes and then again all would cease 
except the distant roaring. 

This great fire wonder called Kilauea has 
been active for hundreds of years, but never 
in its history has any one been known to be 
injured while visiting it. 

Beth Nowell. 



DREAMS 

"That's the stuff dreams are made of." 
Who has the right to make any such asser- 
tion? How is any one in this world in a 
position to judge dream material? It's not the 
sort of thing we can wrap up and take home, 
or have sent, for that matter. Nor can we 
price it, though in the end we usually pay 
for having too much or too little of the fragile 
dream goods. 

Dreams are varied and come in many styles, 
but not to order. There are no illustrated 
fashion books from which we may choose a 
nice sweet dream of sunshine and success ; 
such are only wished to us by well meaning 
friends. We must patiently wait for the fabric 
sent to us, to unfold before our brain. 
We have absolutely no choice as to whether 
the dream is to be bright and glimmering, or 
of a dull, dark, muddy hue. Indeed they 
often come in futuristic styles and seem to be 
the handiwork of an overstrained, outraged 
imagination. Weird, fantastic creatures dash 
through them and scenes change with such 
rapidity that they seem a jumble of over- 
waxed Batik, dipped in the wrong dye. 

But these are dreams of the subconscious 
mind — dreams that come when the body and 
reasoning power are off duty and have sur- 
rendered their places to the fantastical. In 
spite of evidence by Coue, Francois, and emi- 
nent psycho-analysts, I believe this region to 
be ungovernable. 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Of all dreams, day dreams are the best. 
These we can choose and fashion after our 
own hopes, ambitions, and plans for the future. 
There is no blind grasping of "dream stuff" 
here ; these are carefully thought over and 
mentally fitted before they are accepted or 
discarded. And once a perfect one is found, 
our desire is known and we strive our very 
best to attain this wonder dream. It is a re- 
flection of our own personality, tinted to taste. 

So you see, there can be no generalities in 
"stuffs that dreams are made of." 

Mary Ann Miller. 



EVENTIDE 

Have you ever been on the coast of Maine 
at eventide, when the sun has left but a dull 
red and golden glow in the west, and the 
birds are saying their "good-nights" to one 
another? If you have you will realize with 
me the beauty and wondrous splendor of the 
place. 

I am thinking especially of a tiny, grey 
cottage resting on a ledge of rocks which slope 
into the sea. On the piazza stands a young 
girl ; I will try to picture to you the world 
which she sees. In front of her the ocean 
splashes upon the rocks and rushes back with 
a drawing sound, as if to take with it the 
rocks and sands. Not far from the shore lie 
two small islands, their trees standing out 
sharply against the dark sky, while in the dis- 
tance, one can scarcely distinguish the bits 
of land lying surrounded by the ever moving 
waters. They appear blue, deep, deep blue, 
with here and there a light flickering, far 
away. Beside the cottage the woods are still 
and quiet, except for a distant peep from a 
mother bird calling her young ones to sleep, 
or a shrill piercing cry from a hawk calling 
to its mate. Darting in and out, among the 
trees, the fireflies flit with their tiny, glowing 
lanterns, first hiding entirely from human 
view, then suddenly flickering as though to 



assure one of their presence. Now and then 
a cricket chirps, then all is still. The dull red 
glow in the west fades into gold, and the 
dark shadowy clouds pass by it as specters or 
phantoms, taking weird and crude shapes. A 
dull uneven line marks the path of the river, 
while among the trees glimmer the lights of 
the cottages along the banks. The young wom- 
an on the piazza, contented with the comfort 
and beauty of nature, turns to open the door of 
the house, when she is suddenly stopped by the 
sound of oars dipping in the waters. She 
walks slowly to the edge of the piazza and 
waits for the coming sound. Then a boat 
slides along the bank into her view and she 
sees, in the dim light, an old man, his shoulders 
bent, his hair long and gray, steadily and 
evenly guiding his dory through the shadows 
of the coming night. He glances up and cries 
out a resonant "Halloo" and the boat slips 
again out of sight bearing the old fisherman 
to his home. The girl turns, silent, awed, at 
the beauty of the night, and 
"Leaves the world to darkness and to me." 

Mary Saunders. 



MY FAVORITE 

Some people like the winter, 
When the snow is on the ground; 

They like to find a frozen pond 
And skate around and round. 

Some people like the autumn, 
When the harvest time has come; 

They like the old corn huskin', 
And they like to tote a gun. 

Some people like the summer, 

When the swimmin's mighty fine, 

Or to go a berry pickin', 
And to cast a rod and line. 

As for me, I like the springtime, 
When there's fragrance everywhere, 

And the little pushing flowers 
Give their secrets to the air. 

E. Piszini. 











Now that the end of the year is here, I 
think that all of us Juniors realize pretty well 
how much we owe the Seniors. They have 
carried on their shoulders the responsibility of 
the entire student body. A problem comes up, 
we see what the Seniors do and the problem 
is solved. They are the example for the whole 
school and a mighty good one, the class of '23 
has been. 

Shall we next year without their leader- 
ship and support be able to "carry on" ? When 
I peep through the door and see what lies 
ahead for next year I feel as a helpless child 
might who takes his first step alone. 

But we should not hesitate ; the class of '23 
stands before us, proof that a Senior Class 
can, by following faithfully the ideals placed 
before them, by living up to the expectations 
of faculty and underclasses, succeed in over- 
coming all difficulties, petty and big, and win 
the everlasting respect and love of the school. 
Let us, the members of '24, prove to '23 our 
appreciation and love by doing all we can to 
follow in their footsteps. 

Make just one more friend before you leave 
school this June. Perhaps at the present 
moment we are likely to feel that we have 
made enough friends for this year. Do you 
really know your next door neighbor? Have 
you given her half a chance to become ac- 
quainted with you? There are just a few 
days left in this school year. Get busy and 
make the best of your time. Be a "good fel- 
low" to every one and thus help develop more 
strongly that wonderful democratic feeling so 
characteristic of Lasell. 



Byron says somewhere, "The best of proph- 
ets of the future is the past." Fellow-suf- 
ferers, think well in the closing days of this 
year and tremble. Does an imposing array of 
past indifference mount up? Banish pessi- 
mism ! After all we are still "young and 
rich and handsome" ; good intentions can be 
carried out if vigorously shoved by determina- 
tion ; if we have the stupendous total of some 
twenty years more or less behind us, we have, 
nevertheless, the staggering possibilities of a 
whole life before us. If there have been mis- 
takes, we are so much the wiser for them, 
and surely there have been many fine things 
accomplished too. There is the "pollyanna- 
lytical" method of chirping, "Everything's go- 
ing to be all right." A certain amount of 
faith and hope is decidedly essential, but nev- 
ertheless, the best way of making everything 
all right, of blocking out a future worth hav- 
ing, to become a past, is by throttling in- 
difference and buckling down to work. The 
best time to decide to work is the present 
moment. Let the idea germinate during the 
summer months and when the new school 
year begins, surprise your friends and your- 
self by blossoming forth from the placidity 
of a vegetable into a hardy perennial, de- 
pendable year after year. Then the future 
will hold no terrors, for the past will have 
no regrets. 



UP AND DOING 

How are we girls of Lasell going to stand 
and rate in this hustling world? It is already 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



filled with men and women who are achieving 
great things, or who are patiently and con- 
scientiously doing the little things of life ; 
making it easy for some one else to accomplish 
the larger tasks. Each one of us will have to 
struggle, work, and laugh, if we desire to gain 
a place above the common level — 

"We can make our lives sublime, . . ." 

It seems that this must be a challenge ! In 
the hurry of everyday tasks and pleasures, 
we often forget that there are greater things 
ahead ; let us remember — 

"Life is real ! Life is earnest !" 

We do not know what the future will bring 
to us, or rather, what we shall make of the 
future. Hazily we dream of the coming years ; 
it depends entirely upon ourselves whether 
we are happy and successful in the remaining 
years spent at Lasell, in college, at home, or 
in a vocation of our own choosing. Could 
we but realize it is our duty and our pleasure 
to live to our full extent, hour by hour, and 
day by day, and that each act of the present 
fashions the future. — 

"Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant ! 

Act — act in the living Present !" 

If our desire to amount to something in 
the world is great enough, we shall be wide 
awake physically, mentally, and spiritually. 
When we lack one of these qualities, we shall 
find we are off on a little dirt road instead 
of on life's great highway. And let's have 
a happy spirit which can triumph over any 
misfortune. Let us go on — 

"Still achieving, still pursuing," 

We also must remember that Lasell, or the 
world, wants no one who plays the game half 
way ; whatever we are doing, let's throw our- 
selves in with a will — 

"Let us then be up and doing!" 

Each day we should try to better ourselves 
and others. What is the use of being like 
a merry-go-round? The world needs you and 
me. It is for us to make each thought and 
deed worth while, knowing we are doing the 
things that will carry us along life's highway ; 



and incidentally boost the world, — so let us 
". . . Act that each tomorrow, 
Find us farther than today!" 



PLEDGES FOR LASELL ENDOWMENT 

Class of '57 Fund 

Frances Sykes Davis 
Class of '61 Fund 

Caroline Hills Leeds 
Class of '93 Fund 

Jessie Gaskill Wheelock 
Class of '94 Fund 

Harriet G. Scott 

Jennie M. Rich 
Class of '96 Fund 

Josephine Chandler Pierce 
Class of '98 Fund 

Emma Aull Duncan 

Clara Davis Lounsbury 

Jane Myrick Gibbs 

Caroline Kendall Putnam 
Class of '99 Fund 

Evelyn Ebert Allen 

Ethlyn Prentice Knight 

Alice Jenckes Wilson 

Elise Scott Mackintosh 
Class of '02 Fund 

Edith McClure Patterson 

Clara McLean Rowley 
Class of '03 Fund 

Mary Goodwin Olmstead 

Bertha Hayden King 
Class of '05 Fund 

Ida R. Jones 
Class of '06 Fund 

Helen Carter Marcy 
Class of '07 Fund 

Clara Nims 
Class of '08 Fund 

Lizzie W. Morrell 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



Class of '09 Fund 

Louise Funkhouser Colegrove 

Class of '11 Fund 

Louise Mayer Scheim 
Mary A. Ordway 
Gladys Lawton 

Class of '12 Fund 
Florence Jones 
Esther Morey Hain 
Annie Merrill David 

Class of '14 Fund 

Mildred Hotchkiss Girvin 

Class of '15 Fund 

Susan E. Tiffany 

Class of '16 Fund 

Helen Merrill Strohecker 
Maude Hayden 

Class of '17 Fund 
Jessie Shepherd 

Class of '18 Fund 
Ruth Newcomb 
Cornelia Gaty 

Helene Davenport Bowman 
Dorothy C. Barnes 
Lydia Adams 
Barbara McLellan 

Class of '19 Fund 
Mercie Nichols 
Ethel Ramage Fisk 
Carolyn Kuhn Feffer 
Deborah Ingraham 

Class of '20 Fund 

Muriel James Morrison 

Class of '21 Fund 

Marion Bodwell Lesher 
Helen L. Beede 
Leonora Conklin 



Class of '22 Fund 
Lucile Pfeifer 
Leilya K. Barkman 
Iverna Birdsall 

Class of '23 Fund 

Elizabeth Buettner 
Helen Buettner 
Florence Boehmcke 
Dorothy Chase 
Carolyn S. Colton 
Josephine Curry 
Lucy Fuller 
Florence Gifford 
Ruth Hopkins 
Helen Hinshaw 
Ida Markert 
Jeannette Merrick 
Elizabeth Mitchell 
Claire Parker 
Louise Puckett 
H. Mercedes Rendell 
Evelyn Shidler 
Adrienne E. Smith 
Winnifrede A. Stackpole 
Mary Eugenia Swift 
Ruth S. Throm 
Jessie Watters 

General Endowment Fund 
Mabel Hamlin Barby 
Ethel B. Hook 
Gertrude Gleason Shepard 
Julia Funkhouser Mellin 
Susan Hallock Couch 

Chicago Club Fund 
Bertha Hax Auld 

Guy M. Winslow Fund 
Mrs. G. M. Winslow 
Dr. G. M. Winslow 




On March 7, Miss Anna Eichhorn, teacher 
of violin at LaselL gave a most delightful 
recital and many of us were surprised at the 
brilliant playing of our classmates. Our 
Woodland Junior School friends deserve spe- 
cial praise for the excellent rendering of their 
selections. 

PROGRAM 

Allegro Moderato Pleyel 

Dorothy Smith, Gwendolyn McDonald 

Melody Kassert 

Rondo Schmidt 

Marjorie Winslow 

Reverie Carsc 

Jessie Watters 

Cradle Song Kohler 

Andante et air de Ballet Danbe 

Gwendolyn McDonald 

Air and Variations Dancla 

Sing mir Dein Lied Greene 

Donald Winslow 

Berceuse Godard 

Louise Puckett, Elsie' Duffy 

Told at Twilight Huertcr 

Minuet Beethoven 

Dorothy Smith 

Canto Amoroso Sammartini-Elman 

Kujawiak Wieniawski 

Ave Marie Bach-Gounod 

Doris Lougee 

Mrs. Brown and four boys from the Alice 
Freeman Palmer Memorial School of North 
Carolina led the vesper services, April 15. 
They sang charming old negro melodies and 
Mrs. Brown's talk on the present condition 
of her race was very convincing. It seems 
hardly possible that any white person could 
so despicably use the negroes. Certainly some- 
thing should be done to make their life more 
tolerable. 



April 22, Mr. Phen, a Chinese Harvard stu- 
dent, talked to us at vespers. His English and 
his comparisons of Chinese and American cus- 
toms were very interesting. He emphasized 
the difference between the girl from China and 
our American girl by giving vivid observations 
of his own. 

Wednesday evening, April 25, the Trustees 
were guests of the school for dinner and the 
Orphean Concert. Before dinner they had 
their annual meeting. 

The Orphean Concert was certainly a credit 
to its Director, Mr. Henry M. Dunham. The 
singing showed long and faithful practicing. 
The Lasell girls were assisted by several art- 
ists who showed remarkable musical ability. 

PROGRAM 

Rest Thee on this Mossy Pillow Smart 

Ninon Tosti-Harris 

Ye Sons of Israel Mendelssohn 

Orphean Club 
Soprano Solo 

a. Nocturne Pearl Curran 

b. Piper of Love Carew 

c. He Loves Me ' Chadwick 

d. Floods of Spring Rachmaninoff 

Miss Hatchard 

Salve Regina .Dunham 

Love Will Find the Way Brahms 

Orphean Club 

'Cello Solo 

a. Impromptu Dunham 

b. Tarantelle David Popper 

Miss Fraser 

Dream Visions Galbraith 

Orphean Club 



-* 



18 LASELL LEAVES 

Dr Winslow spoke to us on Porto Rico, Ten Thousand Men of Harvard. .Putnam and Taylor 

- TT , . . , , • Good Night, Ladies 

April 28 and May 5. He has visited this part Glee Club 

of the country many times, so his descriptions Fair Harvard 

. J , . , Glee and Mandolin Clubs 
of the fruit orchards and the scenery among 

the limestone hills were especially vivid and Their concert was especially enjoyed not 
his stereopticon views gave us a clearer idea 0% because of the fine rendering of clever 
of the picturesque beauties of the island, selections but of the novelty of at least two 
Dr. Winslow told of many odd native customs of the numbers. A "jazz-band" and a "cake- 
besides the general conditions existing among walker" added an unusual "collegiate flavor" 
the people and stated that teachers are sorely to the evening. The Seniors afterwards acted 
needed to educate the great number of illiter- as hostesses in the drawing-room, 
ates swarming this thickly populated island. Dr. Butters was unable to take charge of the 

Very often people confuse Porto Rico with vesper service May 6, so each house had its 

the Philippines— they are only seven thousand own informal prayer-meeting. In the parlors 

miles apart. The island is easily found on at Bragdon, Miss Potter conducted one of her 

the map of the Caribbean Sea, in the West "sual helpful services ; and in the Blue Room 

Indian group south of Florida, while if one an inspiring service led by Mrs. Furlong was 

decides to cruise down there, the palm trees held for Woodland and the Junior School, 

and warmth of the tropics insure a most A Glee Club picnic was planned for May 

delightful vacation. 9, down the river in canoes, but on account 

The Dramatic Club generously has taken of stormy weather the girls enjoyed their pic- 
a page in the Lamp and the rest of their nic supper instead in P. K. 
money is to be given to the Senior Endowment Dr. and Mrs. Winslow had the Seniors as 
Fund. The entire club went on a picnic down their guests at a delightful informal recep- 
tee river May 4, with Miss Stackpole as chap- tion on May 11. There was a most enjoyable 
eron. They were gone from four to seven and program given by the Commonwealth Trio, 
the girls are very grateful to Miss Stackpole It was a great pleasure for the Seniors to 
for the good time they had. be together with Dr. and Mrs. Winslow and 

The Harvard Freshman Glee Club gave the children for a last informal Lasell family 

their services again this year on May 5, for gathering before graduation. 

the benefit of the Endowment Fund. The pro- Our own Congregational minister, Dr. 

gram was as follows : Drew, led the service May 13, and among 

PROCRAM other topics spoke very appropriately about 

■□ • -r, j aij c . 1 it 11 c Mothers' Day. A hearty welcome is always 

Bonnie Dundee Old Scotch hoik Song J J J 

Mister Moon Smith and Bowman extended to Dr. Drew by the Lasell girls. 

On to Plattsburg ^ ...".. . .Herbert W. Lowe ° ne of the best lectures this term was given 

Rose of the Rio Grande Warren and Gorman by Mr. Towne when he told US of his first 

Instrumental Specialty" 30 ^ experiences in teaching. How he treated bul- 

Jazz Band lies and started a student government were 

^hfsl«r d ::/:.v.'.v::.-::.':.F i eid A 'a , „d M M"S p* rt of his — ^ ™*>* » * <=»>•** 

Glee Club school, and mavbe some of us "future teach- 

Sa^V.-.V:.V.V.-.V.-.V."V.V.-.-. I S d & B 0*3 erS " wiU Use his experiences ,o good advan- 

Mandolin Club tage when we begin to teach. 

Quartet Specialty „, ,. . . , , , „ . , , 

Portfolio, Schacht, Combs and Hill L he chck of castanets, a bold Spanish youth 

Football Medley Williams and Fletcher and a song to a fair damsel in the balcony! 

Journey's End Harry Tierney r^, ~ . , , , „ , . 

Banjo Club * he Spanish play is on ! So natural is every- 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



one in it that in our imagination we are in 
Spain, witnesses of the love scenes, the duel 
and the dancing. All the performers certainly 
deserve a great deal of credit — "Congratula- 
tions to you, Senora ! To you we are indebted 
for a most enjoyable evening." 

Tuesday night, May 15, we all went to the 
Congregational Church to hear Ferri Felix 
Weiss talk on "The Trail of the Spy." He 
has been an inspector of immigration for many 
years in the port of Boston and is now a 
secret service agent. He told many thrilling 
and weird stories connected with his profes- 
sion. Mr. Weiss' main statement was that 
America needed alertness because of the dan- 
gerous ideas of today and also a greater and 
deeper patriotism. A remarkable drill by the 
Scouts of Newton, followed by a delightful 
solo by Mrs. Harper and a duet by Mr. and 
Mrs. Harper, concluded the evening. 

The May breakfast was all that Miss Pot- 
ter promised. It isn't always that we can 
enjoy good food and still feel that we are 
helping the missionaries ; but that's what we 
all did Wednesday morning, the sixteenth of 
May. Fresh strawberries, bacon and eggs, 
coffee and doughnuts certainly were a big 
treat for us. And we are 100 per cent willing 
to help the missionaries next year ! 

A charming buffet supper was held by the 
French Cercle in the Green Room at Wood- 
land, early in May. Fifteen girls enjoyed 
delicious food of all sorts and French con- 
versation followed. 



THE WASHINGTON TRIP 

The Washington trip this year was indeed 
a happy experience with our dear Miss Potter 
as a most delightful chaperon. The mem- 
bers of our party were Margaret Bullock, 
Ethel Cole, Adrienne Fontaine, and Ruth Hop- 
kins, — the Seniors in the party ; and Natalie 
Albury, Elsie Duffy, Jean MacKay, and Mar- 
garet Niday,- — the underclassmen. There 
were also with us, the mother and sister of 



Jean MacKay, Maude Tait, Helen Libby, '22, 
and Julia Noyes. 

Six members of our party left Bragdon 
Hall at 5:13 P.M. in a racing taxicab for 
the 5:15 train to Boston, the other members 
of the party joining us at the South Station. 
We were accompanied, by way of the Fall 
River Line to New York, by Marjorie Gifford, 
'22, and several other Lasell girls. 

We arrived in Philadelphia about eleven 
o'clock, so there was time for a short tour 
of the Quaker City before having luncheon 
at the Rittenhouse. In Independence Hall the 
most interesting things were the table on 
which the Declaration of Independence was 
signed, and the historic Liberty Bell. We 
also visited Betsy Ross' house, the birthplace 
of Old Glory. 

Washington was reached in a biting gale, 
in time for a late dinner at the Raleigh, our 
pleasant home for four days. 

Easter morning we attended service at the 
First Congregational Church of Washington, 
where the singing and sermon were unusually 
fine. One of our number was ushered into 
the pew of Vice-President Coolidge. 

On our pleasant drive, the afternoon of 
Easter Day, we saw the municipal buildings, 
the United States Treasury, the estate of Gen- 
eral Sherman, the White House, the War 
Risk-Insurance Building, residences of sen- 
ators, foreign embassies, the old home of 
Admiral Dewey, the Carnegie Institute, and 
the Scottish Masonic Temple; we drove 
through the National Zoological Park, saw 
the residence of Ex-President Wilson, and 
caught a glimpse of Mrs. Wilson and her 
brother. The residence of Secretary Hoover 
next attracted our attention, then more homes 
of notable people, and the Weather Bureau 
building and grounds, where there was the 
greenest grass we saw in all that chilly city. 

On our way to Arlington Cemetery, we 
passed through Georgetown, and saw the 
building in which George Washington made 
his headquarters while surveying the District 
of Columbia. 



P 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Arlington Cemetery is a sad but beautiful 
place, — sad because of the thousands of sol- 
diers buried there, and beautiful because of 
its imposing situation and magnificent struc- 
tures. 

Monday morning we began sight-seeing in 
earnest. We went first to the office building 
of the Representatives, where we met the 
private secretary to Representative Luce of 
Massachusetts, who kindly guided us to other 
parts of the capitol. The little subway car 
which carries senators quickly from the cap- 
itol to their office building is unique ; one of 
our girls described it as "a large installment 
of an old-fashioned wood basket." We met 
Senator Fletcher of Florida, who was very 
gracious, Senator McNarey of Oregon, and 
several others. 

The capitol building was wonderful. The 
decorations, done by Bromici in 1850, were 
being retouched by Mr. Whipple, the artist 
of the capitol. We were interested in the 
frieze of the dome, the latest section of which, 
representing the entrance of America into 
the World War, is the work of Mr. Whipple. 
In the President's room most of us took 
advantage of the opportunity to sit in the 
chair where presidents have sat when signing 
many important documents. Later we had 
luncheon at the Restaurant of the Senators. 

Monday afternoon we enjoyed a boat trip 
up the picturesque Potomac River to Mount 
Vernon. The simple tomb of Washington 
guarded by a faithful old darky, black as the 
shades of night, impressed us with its gran- 
deur, and we all loved the stately old man- 
sion with its many historic associations. Re- 
turning from Mount Vernon, we passed the 
church which Washington used to attend. 
Some of us were not too tired after dinner 
to attend a fine concert by the Amherst Col- 
lege Glee and Mandolin Clubs, given at the 
First Congregational Church. 

After waiting more than an hour for the 
elevator, and then climbing to the top of 
Washington Monument, we had on Tuesday 
morning, an excellent view of all Washing- 



ton, and especially of the impressive Lincoln 
Memorial. The Pan-American Building 
seemed very different from other structures ; 
we revelled in its beauty, but the patio pleased 
us most of all. The famous paintings and 
sculptures in the Corcoran Art Gallery were 
specially interesting to those of us who have 
been studying history of art this year. 

Tuesday afternoon we visited the Bureau 
of Engraving and Printing, where we saw 
stamps and paper money in the process of 
being made. We also saw the Ford Theatre, 
where Lincoln was assassinated and visited 
the house in which he died. During the re- 
mainder of the afternoon we had an oppor- 
tunity to visit the Washington shops. 

In the evening Miss Potter and three for- 
mer Lasell girls : Edith Vance Nicolson, '19, 
Phyllis Rowe, '19, and Marion Eaton, '20, 
enjoyed a most delightful dinner party. We 
were glad to meet these successful young 
women. 

Wednesday morning at ten o'clock, Secre- 
tary Weeks received our party in his private 
office, in the Department of War. He was 
most cordial and arranged for us to see a 
cloak, scarf, and spurs, connected with the 
attempted escape of Jefferson Davis; also the 
pistol with which Booth killed Abraham Lin- 
coln, and other things associated with the 
assassination of our martyred president. 

The White House was being re-decorated, 
so we were able to enter the annex for only 
a few minutes, then we went on through the 
beautiful grounds to the Treasury. The 
other important places which we visited that 
last day were the National Museum, where 
we saw the Roosevelt Collection, and the 
Congressional Library, where we enjoyed the 
wonderful pictures and beautiful architecture. 
Through the courtesy of the Librarian we 
saw the intricate method used in this library 
for transferring books from stacks to reader. 

We left Washington, on the morning of 
April 5th, going straight through to New 
York where a few of our party left us, the 
rest going on a sight-seeing trip through the 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



great metropolis. We left New York in the 
late afternoon. Our Washington trip was 
ended and the universal verdict voiced by one 
of the underclassmen, "We have had a per- 
fectly divine time !" 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

March 24. Woodland Park girls were a 
very enthusiastic part of the audience at the 
Senior play at Bragdon Hall. 

March 25. Miss Edith Woodman of Bos- 
ton entertained us at the Tea Hour in the 
living room at Junior House. Miss Wood- 
man sings very beautifully and gave us a gen- 
erous program. Dr. and Mrs. Winslow were 
among our guests. 

March 26. We enjoyed the Gymnasium 
Exhibition given by Lasell students at Gard- 
ner Gymnasium. 

During the Easter holidays Miss Hemme- 
on's younger sister, Catherine, was a guest 
at Woodland Park. Together with the girls 
remaining for the holiday they had several 
pleasant excursions. "Robin Hood" and "Dis- 
raeli" were the plays attended. One day was 
spent in Cambridge visiting the Widener Li- 
brary and different museums, and lunching 
at the "Cock Horse," the home of Longfel- 
low's "Village Blacksmith." Another day 
was given to the Boston Art Museum, the 
Boston Public Library, and the Women's 
College Club. 

April 3. We are glad to welcome Eleanor 
Zimmer who came to us from Watertown, 
New York, and whose credits allow her to 
finish our Eighth Grade this year. 

We have been glad to welcome several 
school visitors this term. Among them were 
Miss Wing of the Brookline Public Schools, 
the Principal of the Waban School and the 
Educational Representative of the Red Book. 

April 19. We have tried every plan by 
which we could view the Marathon Races and 
not omit a school session. This year's plan 
was most successful — the Marathon viewed 
till 2 :39 P. M. and the usual afternoon session 
scheduled from 2 :30 to 4 :30 P. M. 



April 20. The very first time Woodland 
Park girls attended an evening theatre in Bos- 
ton ! We were very proud to be a part of 
the Lasell group and to hear "Disraeli." The 
tickets sold were a benefit — the 1923 Class 
Endowment Fund. 

Visiting Parents : 
Mrs. Braithwaite. 
Mrs. Parker. 
Mr. Coombs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Hambleton. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Curtis and son, 

Harold. 
Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Lawrence. 
April 26. Mrs. Ellery, wife of Dean Ellery 
of Union College, Schenectady, New York, 
and Miss True of Lasell, dined with Mrs. 
MacDonald and the Junior School. 

April 27. Woodland Park School was "At 
Home" to the Faculty and Students of Lasell. 
The occasion was also a Reunion of Wood- 
land Park "old girls." Mary Cowles, Ruth 
Dunning, Louisa Mueller, Elinor Chase, Dor- 
othy Palmer, Dorothy Messenger, Catherine 
and Jane Brown came in to see us. Letters 
or cards were received from Miss Huson, 
Pauline Lyon, Elizabeth Retan, Miss K. Da- 
vis and Katharine Leatherbee. Mrs. G. M. 
Winslow, Mrs. Towne, Mrs. E. J. Winslow 
and Mrs. Furlong kindly assisted in serving. 

April 29. Mrs. McDonald, Victoria Jack- 
son, Julia Larrabee, and Gwendolyn McDon- 
ald attended Paderewski's concert in Sym- 
phony Hall. 

May 5. We were very much honored at 
our Tea Hour when Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Cobb and Mr. and Mrs. Dean Hanscom were 
our guests of honor. Mrs. Cobb told sev- 
eral of her stories in her inimitable way, and 
Mr. Hanscom delighted us with two groups 
of songs. Miss Bunting also played for us 
and accompanied Mr. Hanscom. Several 
guests enjoyed the hour with us. 

May 6. A very jolly evening at the Har- 
vard Freshman Glee Club Concert at Brag- 
don Hall. We young people very much enjoy 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



the custom of selling sweets and other light 
refreshments during the programs. 

May 7. No one of our group (except Lucy 
Hopkins from the West Indies) understood 
a word of the Spanish play! But we enjoyed 
the action, the costumes, the songs and danc- 
ing, and the pretty scenery. 

May 12. Mrs. Ernest Cobb entertained the 
Junior School — a picnic at her farm in New- 
ton Upper Falls. On account of the rain the 
party was held in the house. Mrs. Cobb told 
us several of her unpublished stories. Lunch, 
charades and other games made a perfect 
day. 

In the evening we attended the Junior play, 
"Daddy Long-Legs," at Bragdon Hall. 

May 13. Mr. and Mrs. Trueworthy White 
spent Sunday, May 13, at Woodland Park 
School. 

With our closing only three weeks distant, 
we are busy, — music (piano and violin), 
May-pole dance, final examinations, Chorus 
— all to be prepared for June 7th. We would 
like to have you all with us at 2 :30 P. M. on 
that day ! 

OUT OF DOORS 

We had been watching impatiently for 
spring, ever since the sunshine of March had 
melted the snow banks and her winds had 
swept and dusted clean every bare place. 

At last she fulfilled winter's promise and 
in soft green robe came with crocus, violet, 
arbutus and pussy willow. Out of doors 
she lured the children and they answered the 
call, drinking in the sunlight, clambering up 
the side hill to gather pink and white rock 
blossoms, sniffing now faint, now stronger 
wafts of fragrance, swinging up into cool 
green leaves, amid soft shadows, — one with 
the breezes, the sunshine, the breath of spring 
flowers and clear bird calls. Some call it 
"Out of Doors" and others call it — God. 



The roofs of May's house all happily welcome 
The leafy, small buds on the branches that swing, 

And the early arbutus that makes the soft carpet 
Seems to wake up and cry, " 'Tis spring, oh, 'tis 



'TIS MAY! 'TIS MAY! 
There are hard little buds on the joyous boughs, 

And, coaxing, the sun seems to say, 
"Come out, come out, and flower and leaf, 

Come out, brighten up, for 'tis May!" 



spring 



The small feathered minstrels are singing their 
sweetest, 
To tell every one, as they join in the lay, 
That the long winter's past, and spring's again with 
us, 
With fragrance and sunshine, " 'Tis May ! 'tis 
May!" 

Marguerite Gillespie (13 yrs.) 



SPRING TIME 

I have been watching, 

Watching all day, 

A quick little carpenter 

Whose name is May. 

He is building a house ; 

Its foundation is roots 

Of trees that will soon 

Bear the promise of fruits ; 

The floor is of oak 

With a carpet of grass, 

That will soon bear footprints 

Of laddie and lass; 

The walls have for tapestries, 

Beautiful flowers 

That yield sweetest fragrance 

Through day and night hours. 

Such music I never have heard before 

As I pause a moment at opened door 

To listen to songs only wild birds can sing, 

'"Tis spring! 'tis spring! 'tis spring!" 

Gwendolyn McDonald (11 yrs.) 



SPRING 

Spring ! Spring ! 

Jubilant Spring! 
From where do you come 

With your joyous ring? 

You cover with grass 

The hills and plains. 
You bring back the birds 

And refreshing rains. 

Over the hilltops 

Soft breezes blow, 
Down in the valley 

The violets grow. 

Spring to me is very dear, 
For it brings so much of cheer. 

Birds are singing, blossoms swinging, 
Spring ! Sweet Springtime's here. 

Dorothy Smith (13 yrs.) 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



IN BLOSSOM TIME 

Clothed in green are all the trees. 
Leaves all flutter in the breeze. 

All the birds sing songs we love, 

From the leafy green above. 
Fruit trees now their blossoms bear, 
Fragrant apple, peach, and pear. 

Spring is here in beauty fair, 

One can't wish for scene more rare. 

On the marshy, swampy land 
Yellow cowslips are at hand ; 

Primrose, pretty, pink and sweet, 

Violets around our feet. 
Tiny brooklets rushing by, 
With a fairy, tinkling cry. 

On the banks on every side, 

Flowers, sweet, and ferns abide. 

Gertrude Curtis (12 yrs.) 



THE VIOLET 

Oh, modest little violet, 

With your pretty face, 
Gazing up towards heaven 

Dainty, full of grace. 

When the dawn is breaking 

And the robins sing, 
You uncurl your petals 

And in the breezes swing. 

When the sun is setting, 

And the shadows fall, 
Then you curl your petals tight, 

And silence reigns o'er all. 

Hazel Lawrence (14 yrs.) 



TO SPRING 

Sweet Spring, you bring us gladness, 
Your beauty dispels all sadness ; 
You bring us birds and honey bees, 
You bring us flowers and leafy trees 
That stand and rustle in the breeze. 
Oh, Spring, we're always full of glee 
When after winter we welcome thee. 

Eleanor Zimmer (12 yrs.) 



SUMMER 

Oh, dandelions in the grass, 

Are you bits of sunshine, only brighter? 
You stretch your skirts to catch more sun, 

And make sad hearts seem lighter. 

You gild the lawns and gardens, 
Where your cheerful face is seen, 

And brighten up the poor back yards, 
Till they're gardens fit for a queen. 



The sun, creeping through the branches, 

Makes a pattern on the lawn, 
The sky is a dome of heavenly blue 

And all the clouds are gone. 

There are cool little breezes blowing, 
That rumple through your hair, 

And the smell of green things growing 
Seems to meet you everywhere. 

Marguerite Gillespie (13 yrs.) 



ROBIN TELLS US — 

Now the spring has come, 

Robin tells us so; 
We see the yellow daffodils 

Bloom and nod and blow. 

Trees are budding, sunbeams are flooding, 

Everything with golden light; 
Bees are humming, woodpeckers drumming, 

Everybody's happy and bright. 

Maxim Lawrence (13 yrs.) 



CORRECTION 

The editor of the Leaves thanks Mr. Fred- 
erick J. Ranlett for the following correction : 
We certainly wish to give "honor to whom 
honor is due" and take this opportunity of 
thanking Miss Dike most sincerely for her 
generous gift to Lasell. 

Auburndale, Mass., 
May 17, 1923. 
Miss Helen L. Chapman, 
Editor of Lasell Leaves, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

My dear Miss Chapman : 

I fear that the very kind allusion to me in the 
editorial in your March issue might be construed 
as giving me too much personal credit for the gift 
of books from Mrs. Dike's estate. 

By the terms of Mrs. Dike's will these goods 
passed to Miss Sarah M. Dike (Mr. Dike's sister) 
who directed me as executor to offer them to the 
Lasell library. I admit that this commission was 
very gratifying to me — but the gift should be re- 
garded as Miss Dike's. 

Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Frederick J. Ranlett. 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 





Wedding bells are ringing and lo — in imag- 
ination — a charming company of Lasell brides 
and grooms are marshalled into line. Here 
they are ! 

Helen L. Coons, '21, became the bride of 
Mr. Miles Miller Zoller on the fifth of April. 

The fourteenth of April was the wedding 
day of Winifred Tracy, '18, and Mr. William 
Green Wheelock, Jr. 

Gertrude Buettner, '17, and Mr. Fred 
Janusch were united in marriage on the 
twelfth of April. After the first of June 
Mr. and Mrs. Janusch will be at home at 406 
Roslyn Place, Chicago, 111. 

The tenth of April was the wedding clay of 
Eloise Bordages and Mr. William Edward 
Masterson. Mr. and Mrs. Masterson will be 
at home at 639 South Vermont Ave., Los An- 
geles, California, after the first of September. 

Lilian Wood, '22, became the bride of Mr. 
Edwin Elmer Pierce on the fourteenth of 
April. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce will be at home 
at 22 Second Street, Taunton, Mass. 

Miss Georgie Seely (our former nurse at 
Woodland Park) and Mr. Everett James 
Chambers were married on the thirty-first of 
March. 

The eighteenth of April was the wedding 
day of Doris Brown, '21, when she became 
the bride of Mr. Frederick Jordan Ranlett, 
Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Ranlett will be at home 
at 71 Woodland Road, Auburndale, Mass. 

Marion ("Jack") Frost and Mr. Charles 
E. Hughson were united in marriage on the 
eleventh of April. 

The announcement of the engagement of 



Helen Kirkpatrick, '20, and Mr. John Wil 
Ham Welch is received. 

The engagement announcement of Virginia 
Emmott, '22, and Mr. Andrew Stewart Orr 
is received. 

Cards have been received announcing the 
engagement of Helen Brooks, '20, and Mr. 
Charles Louis Brown. 

The engagement of Olive Chase, '19, and 
Mr. George William Mayo is announced. 

The engagement announcement of Thirza 
Abrams, '21, and Mr. Harold Wilton Arrow- 
smith is received. 

The engagement of Eunice E. Perkins and 
Mr. Herbert Eugene Hill is announced. 

Our Principal, Dr. Winslow, recently sailed 
away to his possessions in Porto Rico. Aside 
from the joy of the trip he gathered most 
interesting information and took some splen- 
did pictures which he shared later with our 
school. Already the girls are hoping that 
some day he will take a personally conducted 
party to visit that tropical, faraway land. 

"Sis" Loomis, '22, opens her lively message 
by telling us that not for one moment has she 
forgotten Lasell and Lasell sends back the 
answer, "the same to you." She further adds, 
"I have been quite the busy girl this year. 
From October till February, I attended a busi- 
ness college in Chicago. Early in February 
obtained a position as an assistant secretary. 
Like my work immensely and enjoy being 
able to do something useful. The other night 
I had a telephone call from Margaret Greg- 
son Barker (1909-13). She wanted to know 
the date of River Day, for she is counting 
on going back. She has three adorable chil- 
dren, the youngest being only a few months 
old. Lasell spirit is glorious ! Marjorie Lewis 
and I are planning to return to our Lasell 
home for Commencement. This is just the 
time of year when the tennis courts are so 
popular and study hour not quite so popular ! 
I fancy Crew practice is in full swing. I 
don't need to tell you how tickled I was when 
I came home and found the Leaves. While 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



in school I '11 admit I more thoroughly appre- 
ciated The Meow, but to a 'grad,' the Leaves 
is a gold mine. Just think, in a month I'll 
he back with you all," and we all will be de- 
lighted to see you, "Sis." 

There has come into the possession of the 
Personal Editor of the Leaves a fine tribute 
to our Prof. Henry M. Dunham from one 
of the leading musicians of New York City. 
The writer pays tribute to Mr. Dunham's gift 
as a composer. This musician was recently 
called upon to play a composition of Mr. 
Dunham's at Carnegie Hall and expresses his 
appreciation in these words : " 'Aurora' is in 
my opinion an inspired musical conception. 
Any composer would be proud to have written 
it. It reflects so well the colors of my coun- 
try. I congratulate you upon your fine work." 

Maude Hayden '16 is now a woman of af- 
fairs. In a charming note sent to our Princi- 
pal she enclosed her pledge for the Endowment 
Fund expressing her great appreciation of the 
Leaves and tells us that she has a position as 
secretary in a real estate office. Maude had 
recently received the Round Robin class let- 
ter in which she finds the announcement of the 
arrival of Dot Brate McPherrin's '16 daugh- 
ter, Jean, born on St. Patrick's Day. She also 
adds "thirty of our class are married and there 
are fifteen little children who have come to 
gladden the homes of these Lasell mothers." 
We are sorry that Maude cannot join her 
father and mother and sister Ruth '20 as they 
come on their annual visit to Lasell at Com- 
mencement time. 

During the Lenten season Reverend Per- 
cival M. Wood, rector of the Episcopal church 
in Auburndale, gave a most inspiring talk at 
Lasell. Reverend Wood had just returned 
from a conference held in Nashville, Tennes- 
see, having gone as the representative of the 
Episcopal church in New England. 

The unfailing kindness of our poet friend, 
Dr. Denis A. McCarthy, was manifested in the 
gift to a number of us of a charming Easter 
greeting. We take the liberty of quoting one 
of his poems. 



"Easter-time and flowers upspringing 
Easter songs in rapture ringing 
Easter-time and Christ-adorinp- 
Souls from sin and sorrow soaring." 
It is many days since we have looked into 
the dear faces of the Davis sisters, Gladys 
and Marjorie, from Contoocook, N. H., and 
even after their pilgrimage back to the school 
home some of us failed to see them. Come 
again, dear girls, if possible at Commencement 
time. 

Louise Titus has recently had a visit from 
her sister, Miss Grace Titus. Seldom have we 
enjoyed a visitor more than this dear girl 
and we have, without her permission, adopted 
her into our Lasell family. 

Dear Thirza Abrams '21 we thank you for 
your message sent from faraway Chili. Thir- 
za is now the guest of her sister, Carolie 
Abrams Painter. She is charmed with South 
America but "dear little white dove" don't 
let those fragrant southern roses and the gra- 
cious hospitality of your sister and brother 
win you away permanently from the States. 
Thank you for the beautiful picture of the 
Palace of Fine Arts at Santiago, Chili. 

How those western people do flit to and 
fro in their splendid cars over ideal roads. 
Dorothy Barnes '18 writes our Principal that 
they are just back from a winter spent in Cali- 
fornia. While there she attended the Southern 
California Lasell Club Luncheon and gives 
this voluntary contribution, "I did not know 
many of the guests but enjoyed them all and 
some of the oldest graduates are most interest- 
ing and very good looking" (hear! hear!). 
Dorothy adds "Amy Phillips '18 was at the 
luncheon and along with Edith Holman we 
were at the one small table and had a good 
time. Amy, by the way, is an art decorator 
and has certainly made good. She has quite 
an establishment in Los Angeles which she 
and her partner proudly exhibited to us. She 
has done some beautiful work in and around 
the city — a great many of the buildings down- 
town as well as churches and residences have 
been decorated by these young artists. Amy is 



f 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



very capable and efficient and her partner is a 
charming girl from Georgia. I am writing 
every member of our class about our fifth re- 
union to be held in June. We all hope to be 
there. This June will be my father's fortieth 
college class reunion and he and mother are 
planning to return to Ohio to attend it." Doro- 
thy closes with kindly remembrances to Mrs. 
Winslow, Miss Witherbee and Miss Potter. 

Helen Balcom '20 writes to our Principal 
that "a cousin is considering Lasell seriously 
for next year," and Lasell hopes the cousin 
will decide to come our way. Although not 
able on account of home duties to give extra 
time to her music, Helen is still devoted to 
her art. She closes her letter with, "I very 
often recall our talk about my future and am 
fully convinced that whereas a public career 
would be worth while, yet the supreme satis- 
faction would be pleasing the home circle and 
the enjoyment in years to come for one's self 
would mean more than anything else." 

Among the three candidates for the Queen 
at the annual May pageant at Northwestern 
University, we find the name of our Marguer- 
ite Stearns. 

That was a dear card Marian Crawford '22 
sent to our Preceptress. She is still talking 
about it but wishes the sender had added a 
bit of news about her own dear self. 

Jean Woodward, president of the class of 
1922, has been granted the unusual privilege 
of extending to her classmates an invitation 
to attend the wedding of Marjorie Gifford '22 
and Mr. George W. Grimm, Jr. The cere- 
mony will take place at the Lake Hopatcong 
Yacht Club, Lake Hopatcong, New Jersey, on 
Saturday afternoon, June 23, 1923, at four 
o'clock. A pleasant rumor is abroad that 
many of the old girls are planning to be pre- 
sent and Marjorie is hoping that many more 
will accept this informal but cordialinvitation. 

Dr. Winslow is very grateful to Emilie 
Kothe Collins, '00, for her report of the South- 
ern California meeting. The report came in- 
formally addressed in the form of a note to 
our Principal. She writes, "My dear Dr. Wins- 



low : On Tuesday, March the thirteenth, the 
fifteenth annual luncheon of the Southern Cal- 
ifornia Lasell Club was held at the Mary Lou- 
ise Tea Rooms, Los Angeles. We are particu- 
larly fortunate in having Mr. Bragdon with us. 
His personal interest in each and all of us, 
brings back the happy Lasell days as nothing 
else could. We were sorry that Mrs. Brag- 
don and Miss Ransom were unable to be with 
us. We enjoyed your letter telling us about 
the girls who have been at Lasell since our 
time, and the splendid work some of them are 
doing. There are probably many changes since 
J have seen the school, and I hope I may be 
able to visit Lasell again — but Auburndale is 
far away from Los Angeles. Those present 
at the luncheon this year were : 
Dr. Bragdon 
Belle Bragdon Kelsey '95 
May Church Cottle (1886-87) 
Lilian Douglass '07 

Leona Benner Brotherton '08 v 

Lela Goodall '08 
Mildred Goodall Campbell '10 
Esther Starr Powers (1906-08) 
Carolyn B. Moore '14 
Lucy Muth Kinney (1898-99) 
Elizabeth Ewing '93 
Ava Rawleigh Chapman (1891-93) 
Louise Whitney Weaver (1890-93) 
Elizabeth Lum '01 

Fannie Dillrance Couts (1878-79) 
Emilie Kothe Collins '00 
Marguerite Miller Eggers 
Mary Seaman (1891-93) 
Winifred Conlin Clarke (1892-95) 
Charlotte Lesh '12 

Caroline Thompson Moore (1897-98) 
Kate Wheldon Plumb '02 
Annie MacDonald Muir (1907-08) 
Martina M. Miller (1901-02) 
Nellie Briggs Sandos (1895-6) 
Louise Wadleigh Bedall (1902-03) 
Helen Cleaveland Coleman (1892-93) 
Isabelle Bowers Church (1900-01) 
Laura Chase '02 
Catherine Kendrick Cole '02 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



Jessie Ground Barnett (1899-00) 

Ina Scott Bryant '01 

Ellen Chase Wood '02 

Elizabeth Castner (1921-22) 

Verda Huntley '22 

Nell Smith Voorhis (1889-90) 

Bertha Gray Richards (1887-88) 

Marion Southwick Wolfe (1900-01) 

Edith C. Holman (1915-16) 

Dorothy C. Barnes '18 

Amy Phillips '18 
Dear Phyllis Maple '22 writes from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin "Perhaps I have seemed 
neglectful ; not for a moment have I forgotten 
Lasell but I am kept busy in this University. 
Mother just forwarded the Leaves and I have 
read it from cover to cover and now I am 
so homesick for Lasell I cannot do another 
thing until I write you. I like the University 
ever so much, but naturally it is very different 
from our Lasell school home. Lately I met 
Marian Crawford '22 returning from her 
spring vacation. I do not think I have ever 
been so glad to see any one. I will not be able 
to visit Lasell at Commencement time. I ex- 
pect to stay home next winter and some time 
during the year am coming to Auburndale." 

Seldom has Lasell been more shocked than 
upon receiving the sad tidings of the sudden 
passing away of the father of our dear Mayno 
Seltzer '22. Mr. and Mrs. Seltzer had fre- 
quently visited our school and endeared them- 
selves in an unusual degree to those who had 
the privilege of meeting them. 

Our tenderest thoughts are also turning to 
our dear Senior, Anna Bullock, who is pass- 
ing through like sorrow in the death of her 
splendid father, Mr. William D. Bullock, who 
passed away after a serious illness. 

The latest sorrow which has come to one 
of our number was the passing away, on May 
9th, of the father of Eleanor Parsons '24. We 
have not yet learned the facts but feel sure 
this great bereavement came as a great surprise 
to the family. 

Dr. Winslow recently received a most 
beautiful but sad message from Mrs. Alice 



A. Votaw, the mother of our Eunice Votaw 
'14. To our great surprise and grief Mrs. 
Votaw told of the passing away of her daugh- 
ter April 8th. Since leaving Lasell Eunice 
had been Supervisor of Art in the Barre, Ver- 
mont, schools. In the early spring she be- 
came ill but her condition did not seem alarm- 
ing. Mrs. Votaw writes, "I was in Texas at 
the time and was telegraphed for, by a friend, 
who saw that Eunice was then in a very criti- 
cal state. She rallied for a short while, then 
slipped quietly away." Mrs. Votaw expressed 
her gratitude to Dr. Winslow and the school 
for their good care of Eunice while a student 
here. She said they often spoke fondly and 
with appreciation of Lasell. 

Our tenderest and most heartfelt sympathy 
is extended to these bereaved schoolmates and 
their families. 

Alberta Whitmarsh came home recently. 
Dear little Alberta, she seemed the same 
charming and vivacious Lasell girl, but since 
leaving us she has received a diploma from 
ber high school and is now completing a course 
in normal school and has accepted, for next 
year, a fine position as teacher in one of the 
Vermont schools. We wish her deserved suc- 



cess. 



Charlotte Ryder '08 writes to Dr. Winslow 
the delightful news that it "looks now as 
though a good part of our class is to be at 
Lasell for a reunion in June. I am just back 
from a wonderful trip. Was with Maria 
Riker Hume '09 in Kentucky, was with 
Sophie Mayer '08 in Hamilton, Ohio, and stop- 
ped for a few days with Julia DeWitt Read 
TO in Newark, New Jersey. We are expect- 
ing Leona Benner Brotherton '08 to be back 
in June, also Grace Emerson Cole '08." That 
is good news, Charlotte, and we hope that your 
plans will all come to pass. 

Of all the charming photographs received by 
our Preceptress recently is the one of Lela 
Goodall '08, taken with her little nineteen 
months' old niece, Constance Goodall Camp- 
bell. Lela writes on the back of the card "a 



y 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



future Lasellian." The picture was taken in 
California. 

Marjorie Loomis '21 made quite a detour 
in order to visit the school and we greatly 
appreciated her coming. She was East for 
Dot Ely's '22 wedding and gave us a charm- 
ing description of this dear Lasell bride's wed- 
ding. 

Maxine Perry '22 was also at Lasell on her 
way home from a wedding, having been the 
Maid of Honor of Lilian Wood Pierce '22 of 
Taunton, Mass. She left with us a very de- 
lightful picture of the event. 

Dorothy Chandler of Detroit came into our 
neighborhood recently and kindly ran in once 
or twice to visit us. She had spent the winter 
in Florida and spoke of frequently seeing 
"K" Rice '20 in social functions at home. Al- 
though they had never met she felt acquainted 
because of hearing of "K's" accomplishments 
while at Lasell. 

One of our Lasell brides, Mildred Hotchkiss 
Girvin '14, sent a most interesting letter from 
her "castle in Spain." She writes "My hus- 
band works all hours of the day and night, 
in fact, I never know when to expect him 
home. He is in charge of starting operations 
in the reverberatory furnaces for the manu- 
facture of electrolytic copper. It is situated 
about a mile and a half from Cordoba. There 
is quite a little settlement here at the "Fabrica" 
as the plant is called ; there are about one hun- 
dred houses, varying in size and quality from 
the one-room accommodations of the laborers 
to the house of the director. We have one of 
the medium sized houses, everything new and 
up-to-date and not at all typical of the city 
of Cordoba. Cordoba is one of the oldest 
and most unprogressive cities of Spain. It 
was once an ancient Moorish city and traces 
of their occupation are still visible. The "Mez- 
quita" is the attraction which most tourists 
come to see. Originally it was a Moorish 
Mosque but at the time of the Roman invasion 
of Spain was rebuilt and converted into a 
cathedral. Traces of both periods of architec- 
ture still remain. Another interesting sight 



is the bridge built by the Romans which spans 
the Guadalquier, the river on which Cordoba 
is situated. Beneath the bridge are ruins of 
some ancient Moorish mills. Cordoba is dirty 
beyond description — when I first came I could 
not rise above the smells and the dirt and see 
the beauty of anything, but lately I have suc- 
ceeded in overcoming that feeling and have 
learned to appreciate this corner of the old 
world a little more. We have a very cosmopol- 
itan community here at the plant. There are 
Spanish, a few French, Swiss, German, Rus- 
sian, one Italian family, and one American 
family besides our own. When we came nei- 
ther of us spoke a word of Spanish. I shall 
never forget our trip up from Gibraltar when 
we were not even able to find out whether we 
could get anything to eat. But it has come 
to us gradually and I can now talk to my 
maid without drawing pictures and making 
ludicrous gestures. I pay Paca exactly 45 
pesetas a month, which is about $7.50 in 
our money. This will give you some idea 
of the Spanish wage standard, for that is 
just double what her sister who works in a 
Spanish family gets. There is much pitiful 
poverty among the people, also much ill- 
ness and very poor medical attention. The 
doctors learn their profession by the appren- 
ticeship system and when they think they 
have had sufficient training they branch out for 
themselves. About fifty per cent of the chil- 
dren die before reaching the age of five years. 
The customs are very peculiar. No lady may 
go about alone and even when accompanied 
she will be followed by exclamations on the 
street. A Spanish woman considers herself 
complimented by this, but to an American 
woman used to going about as she pleases, 
it is very annoying at first. I am hoping to 
come back to my tenth reunion in 1924." 

Our Preceptress is still enthusiastically talk- 
ing over that surprise dinner party in Wash- 
ington, D. C. Her hostess was Phyllis Rowe 
'19 and the other guests were Marion Eaton 
'20 and Edith Vance Nicolson '19. Two of 
the girls came all the way from Baltimore and 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



Edith actually separated herself from her 
adorable baby for several hours in order to be 
there. Miss Potter declares she never listened 
to a livelier questionnaire than the one pre- 
sented by these Lasell graduates whose charm 
and enthusiasm bore an abundant testimony to 
their deserved success in public and private 
life. Blessings on their generous hearts and 
dear heads ! 

Dorothy Barnard is back from her sunny 
South and came promptly to Lasell to our 
great joy. We were delighted to see her once 
again enjoying her usual good health and were 
more than delighted when she gave a two- 
thirds' promise that she would return to La- 
sell next year and enter our Senior class. 

It is quite safe to venture to say that the 
happiest old girls of whom we are to report 
are the four little mothers whose special cause 
for rejoicing is given below : 

To Mr. and Mrs. E. Harrington Tilton 
. (Elizabeth Stiles) a daughter, Nancy Tilton. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Doonan (Mary 
Lumbard TO) a daughter, Madge Lumbard 
Doonan. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Frances E. Allen (Doro- 
thy Stewart T7) a son, Stewart Ellwood 
Allen. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Kingman P. Cass (Mary 
Fiske) a son, Donald Chandler Cass. 

The sisters, Amy Tuthill Smith '18 and Ruth 
Tuthill, did not come our way, but sent an en- 
voy extraordinary in the person of their dear 
mother. Mrs. Tuthill tells us that Amy and 
her husband are spending the summer in Min- 
neapolis. Professor Smith is on a government 
errand, using his expert knowledge in connec- 
tion with the commissary department of the 
navy. Ruth and her husband are still in 
Washington, D. C, where he is connected with 
the patent office. 

Just twenty years ago Louise Wadleigh 
Bedall and Lucia Parcher Dow were students 
at Lasell. Back they came one fair May day 
accompanied by their husbands. Louise's home 
is in Los Angeles. She gave us a delightful 
report of Bessie Price Hunt (Mrs. C. B.), 



whose home is now in Rapid City, South Da- 
kota. Bessie is the mother of three beautiful 
children, one daughter and two sons. Lucia 
is one of our loyal New England girls who 
reports at Lasell often but not quite often 
enough. 



JOKES 



(In History class) 'And what was the 
reform of Penal code?" 

C. C. "Oh, wasn't that a reform in the tele- 
graph system ?" 



Long, long hours of dreaming; 
Not a moment of serious thought; 
Crew and tennis and gossip, 
Make spring what it ought. 



"Did you know that all the fishes were ar- 
rested?" 

"No, why?" 

"Because they disregarded the dry laws." 



(In History class) "Tell something about 
Bonar Law." 

Lasell student — "Oh, that was passed in 
1860." 



I've often stopped to wonder 
At Fate's peculiar ways. 
For nearly all our famous men 
Were born on holidays. 



Red — "The American college forgets the 
fundamental part of living." 

Redder — "The mental? Yes, they forget 
that, but the fun, they remember all the time." 



A — "This picture of the horse is good but 
where's the wagon ?" 

B — "Oh, the horse will draw that !" 



Customer — "This muskrat coat is very fine. 
Will it stand the rain?" 

Salesman — "Madam, did you ever see a 
muskrat carrying an umbrella?" 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



"I sent a quarter to a man who advertised 
to tell you how to take out wrinkles in the 
face." 

"And did he tell you?" 

"He did. He said 'Walk out in the open 
air at least once a clay and the wrinkles will 
go out with you'." 



"The next person who interrupts the pro- 
ceedings will be sent home," declared the irate 
Judge. 

"Hurray" yelled the prisoner. 



Algy — "What do you mean by telling Joan 
that I'm a fool ?" 

Percy — "Heavens, I'm sorry. I didn't know 
it was a secret." 



"Have you any opening for a bright, ener- 
getic college graduate ?" 

"Yes, and don't slam it on the way out. " 



'Got a doggy seat in Zoology lecture." 
'What is it?" 
'K 9." 



Mr. Newlywed — "This coffee is awfully, 
weak, dear." 

Mrs. N. — (looking into coffee pot) "I see 
no grounds for your saying so, darling." 



He — "May I be the light of your future 
home?" 

She — "Yes, if you don't go out every night." 



Oh dear ! oh dear ! 

I feel so queer — 

I know not what to write ; 

A composition I must have, 

That, too, this very night ! 

I've pondered long, oh very long, 

And many subjects tried, 

But dull! oh very dull were they, 

And I cast them all aside. 

The fragrant air perfumes the vale, 

The birds sing sweetly, too, 

And toads are hopping round about — 

Oh! dear! what shall I do? 

A. Hendec. 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



* BAKE R'S S I 

CARACAS. SWEET 
CHOCOLATE 




Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 



Established 1780 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



APi>Y £rtjACR'S 



MASKS 
FAVORS 
PUZZLES 
NOISE MAKERS 
NOVELTY BALLOONS 
NOVELTY PAPER HATS 
ETC 



Boston JokeXrick & Novelty Company " 

22 BromfieldSt-Boston 9,Mass 



Clever Joker Novelties. 

Dance. Dinner and Party Favors. 

Your Special Party Colors in Favors toOrder 

Holiday Specialty Favors InTheir Season 



BOSTON JOKER 
DRIBBLE GLASS 
BUZZER LETTER 
MAR9HMALL0W-SNAKE 
. COMIC COOK BOOK 

COMIC PLACE CARDS' 
MIN5TREI. JOKE BOOK 
ETC. 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



THE VALLEY RANCH 




BRAND 

HORSEBACK TRIP IN THE ROCKIES 
FOR YOUNG LADIES 

The party leaves New York in private Pullmans on June 30th, arriving in Cody, Wyoming, 
on July 4th for a day of the famous Cody Stampede, an exhibition of the days of the Old West. 

From this point a forty day saddle and trail trip commences through Yellowstone National 
Park, Jackson's Hole, and the Wyoming Big Game Country, returning to Valley Ranch for a 
few days' visit and the Ranch Roundup before returning East. 

The party is on the go all the time through the most beautiful, interesting, and picturesque 
wild country of America. Seven weeks of solid fun and enjoyment. 

From a Recreational and Educational standpoint this trip can not be duplicated. 

For catalogue giving full information, address: 

JULIAN S. BRYAN, Director 

Valley Ranch Eastern Headquarters 

2044 Grand Central Terminal, 70 East 45th Street, New York 

Telephone Vanderbilt 2335 

FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




r ax Brothers 

Centre Eases, Itobta an* Wttty'xbs 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 



Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 



44 TEMPLE PLACE 



BOSTON 



CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431. 6432 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 

FOR 

REAL SERVICE 

Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 

A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 

BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 


STUDENTS! 

WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 

SCHOOL 

SUPPLIES 

THINK OF 

^-~~~~G*o7 r 7r~^^ of Boston J 

THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON lU SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 


A FRIEND 


L P. Hollander Co, 

Established 1848 

NEW ATTRACTIVE 

SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 


Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 
57 and 58 N. Market St. Boston 


202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 
37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 
BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 1 % South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



QUALITY --, 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



O. S. REED 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waliham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

ilumr Drain's 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

Thatis always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 
That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese. Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH. 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



Gotorite 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 



Inc. 



FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 



364 Boylston Street 



Near 
Arlington Street 



Established 1858 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 




1923 ^ 



SMART 

WALKING 

SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear* 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 

ALBERT P. SMITH GILBERT O. EATON, Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Tumbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 




PURE PRESERVES 

Made by ourselves from Home Recipe 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 
78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., 

Telephone Rich. 820 



Boston 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 



Costumers 



6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E.J. Moneuse, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 




cents 
thrive on 



The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Are. 161 Tremont St. 1311 Wain* St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



GRADUATION GIFTS 



24 inches 
30 " 
36 " 
48 " 




$10.00 
$25.00 
$50.00 
$75.00 



INDESTRUCTIBLE PEARL NECKLACES 

Also, Necklaces in Genuine Amethyst, Crystal, Onyx, Lapis, 

Jade, Topaz and Amber 




NEW WRIST WATCH 

The Case is 18K White Gold — Hand Engraved. The Movement is the reliable 
Bulova — one that we have sold for years and given splendid satisfaction. 

Price of Watch with Diamonds $ 1 00 
Price of Watch without Diamonds $50 




WhoIesale^Retail summer si 



JEWELER? 



BOSTON 

(~\ NEXT DOM 



F. F. DAVIDSON 



F. F. DAVIDSON, Jr. 



MM 



W/5Z 




^^ 






, wconrfncmmT /AN 




LASELL LEAVES 



i>ag tt twttlj 3Umu?r0 




(EJjarg* ammttta anltrifrd 



LASELL LEAVES 



Have You Visited Our 




Mi 



isses 



Sports Shop 

It is a delightful place — just flooded with 

sunshine — on the Third Floor 

of the Main Store 



Jordan Marsh Company 



Bost 



o n 



E. T. Slattery Co, 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



A specialty store that is 
ideally fitted to satisfy the 
apparel wants of the college 
girl. Everything here is 
authentic in style and de- 
pendable in service. 



E. T. Slattery Co 

Tremont Street, Opposite Boston Common 



LASELL LEAVES 




SSHS5 



Oldest Rug Home 
in America 



Linoleum Time Is Here 
This Is Linoleum Place 



FT" VERY year we sell more Linoleum. It is becoming more essential in making the house snug and sanitary. ^~ 

■*— ' The same applies to offices and public places in general. all 

Inlaids are growing in favor for home use, including parquetry effects, tile patterns and geometric designs. cJU 

There are patterns suitable for every room in the house, especially for kitchen, pantry and halls. 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Blouses, Skirts, Silk 
Petticoats, Sweaters 



an 



d F 



urs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 



t% TRA QVALlfy 




Collins & Fairbanks Co. 



Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



H5 



An important feature is the laying of Linoleum. It should be cemented to the floor. This you may BJU 

entrust to us. We manufacture our own cement and employ skilled workmen. [= 

— =^_ == I 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. f 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 10 [=[ 



&sell Leaves 

Vol. XXXXVIH LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, B OSTON, MASS., JUNE, 1923 ~N^~7 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at tiro Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 

LASELL LEAVES STAFF '23 AND '24 

Editor-in-Chief Business Editor 

JOCELYN TONG EMMA SMITH 

Assistant Literary Editor 
ESTHER PALMER 

Assistant Editor - Local Editors 

HELEN SCHROER ANNA HENDEE 

Joke Editors ELIZABETH NOWELL 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 
MARIA PARRY 

Literary Editor Athletic Editor 

DORIS WOODRUFF EDITH HADLEY 

TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $1.00. Single Copies, 15 cents. 

CONTENTS 

COMMENCEMENT 

Baccalaureate Sermon Mclllyar H. Lichliter, D. D. 4 

Vespers /. Edgar Park, D. D. 6 

Class Night 7 

Prizes and Certificates 17 

Commencement Address Rev. Ernest Graham Guthrie 19 

Alumnae Reunion 23 

EDITORIAL -25 

LOCALS 27 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 29 

ENDOWMENT PLEDGES 32 

MR. WALTER R. AMESBURY 35 

PERSONALS ■ •• 35 

JOKES ..... 39 



COMMENCEMENT 



BACCALAUREATE SERMON 

Mcllyar H. Lie Id iter, D.D. 

From the 26th chapter of Matthew, the 
46th verse ; "Arise, let us be going, for he that 
betrays me is at hand." What a strange text, 
you say, for this day of triumph. This is 
Baccalaureate Sunday, you remind me. Why 
lead us into the shadows of Gethsemane ? Why 
darken a day of joy with the memory of a 
day of tragedy? I confess to you that it does 
seem a bit out of place, and my subject seems 
even more out of harmony with such an oc- 
casion — the road to trouble — and trouble is 
the last thing we want to think about on this 
day, but I hope to be able to convince you 
that there is no text more appropriate and no 
subject more vital than this, even on a Bac- 
calaureate Sunday. It is Jesus that is speak- 
ing, "Arise, let us be going, for he that be- 
trays me is at hand." The words are quiet — 
not the slightest break in his voice. It is 
hard to appreciate the absolute calmness of 
spirit under tremendous stress. In this age we 
are so apt to be melodramatic. In this case 
there was every justification for excitement, 
and the Master is calm. It was at this time that 
he came closest to the elementary emotions. 
He faced the alternative : flight or surrender ; 
the way into the wilderness is open ; in the 
darkness he could save himself. That was not 
Jesus' way — the cup was his, and he meant to 
drink it; he had fought his battle and was calm. 
He chose the way down the road to trouble. 
He would make the case of Judas appear 
like a bit of cheap vaudeville. 

The road to achievement is the road to 
trouble. This may be learned from the col- 
lege campus. If athletes tell the truth the 
coaches are not given to over-much coddling. 
A man who goes out for team or crew is hunt- 
ing for trouble, and he gets it ; but he gets 
something else — iron in his blood, splendid dis- 
cipline from team play, and he discovers what 
achievement really means. Some of you are 
going to be tempted to forget that. Life has 
been made comparatively easy for most of 



you. You have been sheltered just so far as 
human love and thoughtfulness could shelter 
you from the fury of the storm. It is pos- 
sible to grow so accustomed to that, that any- 
thing else would seem intolerable. The alter- 
native is ending the sheltered life and start- 
ing out on the road to trouble, and you will 
have to choose. When you face that choice, 
remember the message of Baccalaureate Sun- 
day — the road to achievement is the road to 
trouble. You cannot be both safe and victori- 
ous ; you can't have ease and success. "Safety 
First" is a very splendid motto for railroads 
and automobiles, but very poor for the human 
mind or human soul. No one marches at the 
head of the procession who is unwilling to 
pay the price. 

In every community there is to be found a 
type of young woman who, in my opinion, has 
absolutely no place in modern life — the woman 
who is nothing more nor less than a social 
parasite, — the woman who takes every thing 
and gives nothing. She has always received 
money from home and continues to do so. 
She accepts an allowance, and it never occurs 
to her whether her father be rich or poor, or 
that she owes it to society to make some 
definite contribution and to receive from so- 
ciety some remuneration for her services. She 
spends her mornings in bed ; afternoons at 
matinees or bridge ; and evenings at the theatre 
or dances. This is the special temptation of 
the privileged girl — the temptation to become 
a social parasite. 

There will be the temptation to look upon 
the training here at Lasell as an endowment 
rather than as an investment. A father in a 
Western city once said to me, using a more 
or less modern phrase, "My daughter has been 
to a finishing school." She had. That was 
all that one could say about her. She was 
worth absolutely nothing — in the church, her 
home town activities or anything vital in her 
own home. Why ? She had never learned to 
take the road to trouble. I think that some 
day the State will probably speak in a very 



LASELL LEAVES 



stern way to such people as these, living lives 
of decorative leisure in the world, and say that 
those who do not work shall not eat. Until 
the State does that we shall have to appeal to 
the conscience. I agree with many that every 
girl, no matter how privileged she be, should, 
at the close of her school life, earn her own 
living, or its full equivalent. I speak as the 
father of a daughter who next week will stand 
where you stand — between two educational 
preparations. When you have finished col- 
lege, prove your usefulness by being able to 
earn your own living and to make some definite 
contribution to life; and the one who will 
stand back of you most heartily will be that 
splendid father who knows just what it means 
to take the risks that have made strength and 
achievement possible. Go back home from 
Lasell in this spirit — to prove the training you 
have received. 

And even if there should open that beauti- 
ful door which is called love, be strong enough 
to refuse to enter that door until you have 
made some definite contribution to life. One 
is a very much better daughter and wife who 
has taken the road to trouble. She lives ; while 
those who refuse to go that way, are already 
dead. 

Mr. Emerson pictures that stinging indict- 
ment on wasted opportunity which character- 
izes all of us at times : 

"Daughters of Time, the hypocritic Days, 

Muffled and dumb like barefoot dervishes, 

And marching single in an endless file, 

Bring diadems and fagots in their hands. 

To each they offer gifts after his will, 

Bread, kingdoms, stars, and sky that holds them all. 

I, in my pleached garden, watched the pomp, 

Forgot my morning wishes, hastily 

Took a few herbs and apples, and the Day 

Turned and departed silent. I, too late, 

Under her solemn fillet saw the scorn." 

Do you feel that I have stressed unduly this 
business of making a living? I have done it 
for one compelling reason. I do not know 
of any other way to discover the higher joy 
of comradeship. It is only those who do the 
work of the world who understand what 



friendship really means ; only those who walk 
the common road who understand the splendid 
secret of the common life— the road to trouble 
is the path to comradeship. 

Why need have some law to compel you to 
face your duty to society? Why not today as 
you face this triumphant close, feel the thrill 
of the kinship of the world, and say, "I am 
a part of all life and I want to know it in- 
timately and personally. I want to be in the 
very heart of my home; to understand its 
stress and storm, where my young life can be 
thrown into the breach. I want to put into 
it all that I am, all that I have." I wish you 
might all read this summer "The Middle of 
the Road," by Sir Philip Gibbs. The most 
beautiful figure in that story is the picture of 
the Russian Princess, Nadia, lovely and simple. 
What Nadia worked out in the story we 
must all work out in life if Jesus' dream of 
brotherhood is to come true. The optimism 
that I feel about the state of the world at this 
moment is the fact that the students of the 
Old World have seen this vision and risen to 
it. They are pledged against war and pledged 
for justice and friendship among the nations. 
I covet for the students of America that same 
solidarity ; that same purpose ; that same 
dream of a world brotherhood of men of the 
loving heart. 

If you have the courage to think in new 
terms ; if you have the courage to be different, 
to refuse to drift with the current, to be brave 
enough to think of life as an appeal to the 
best in you, then I say to you, you will find 
beautiful companionship along this road to 
trouble : Frances Willard walks with you ; 
turned aside in her student days in order that 
she might lead the women of the world. Alice 
Freeman Palmer, a beautiful and reliant spirit, 
never thinking of herself — always of other 
people, so that the motto of Wellesley is, "Not 
to be ministered unto, but to minister." It was 
trouble that Florence Nightingale found, sore 
trouble, in Crimea. Edith Cavell faced trouble 
in the darkness of the morning, but the light of 
the martyr was shining in her eyes. They have 
named a great mountain for her, but that peak 



LASELL LEAVES 



is not so beautiful as her spiritual conquest. 
Words would fail me if I attempted to recall 
them all : Mary Lyon, Anna Shaw, Clara 
Barton, Jane Addams, Mary Antin, Marie 
Curie. Any one who dares to walk the road 
to trouble, will walk in delightful company. 
Do you happen to remember the names of 
any of those who have chosen the primrose 
path ? 

Members of the Graduating Class : I have 
dared to sound this clear note of sadness be- 
cause I believe in you. The older statesmen 
and the men of my own generation have made 
a mess of things in the world. They have 
done some things worth while, but, they have 
failed utterly in idealism. They have made 
America a mighty nation, powerful and rich, 
but they have withdrawn this country that 
we love from Europe when she ought to be 
giving everything of herself. They sent our 
youth out into war and now youth is demand- 
ing that we keep faith with our dead, and that 
something of the idealism of the war shall 
be written into the councils of peace. I speak 
to you because you are young; because you, 
too, are to be citizens with a voice, with in- 
fluence to help to turn the tide sweeping the 
other way. If you are great enough to take 
the road to trouble it will be because you have 
kept the inner citadel of your life holy and 
pure for the King of kings. Some of you will 
hear a voice, "I want you women for the new 
China, or Japan, or I want you for America," 
but I will say to all of you without a single 
exception, "I want you to walk the road to 
trouble for the sake of all who suffer and 
who need a friend, and my faith is that you 
will not fail." 

The story is told of the Prince of Wales 
who one day, just a few weeks ago, went to 
visit a hospital in which there were crippled 
soldiers. He walked through the wards think- 
ing of what each man had done for England, 
counting the men as he passed, and so know- 
ing there were seven others that he had not 
seen. He was told that he could not see them ; 
that it was best for his sake. He said he must 



see them, and six more were brought out to 
him, horribly disfigured ; and he went to each 
one of them to thank him for the sacrifice 
he had made for England. He then insisted 
that he see the seventh one. He was told that 
no one saw him. He said that he must see 
him, and they led him into the little room 
where the seventh man lay, blind, deaf, 
maimed, disfigured out of the likeness to 
humanity ; a thing that had been a man who 
had given himself for England. The Prince 
walked to the bedside, turned very white, but 
looked down onto that form there as if he 
would see the last of murderous war ; and 
then he stooped by the bedside and kissed the 
man, and it seemed as though another presence 
had entered the room. 



COMMENCEMENT VESPERS 

At the Commencement Vesper Service, Mr. 
Park spoke on the value of fetishes — good 
fetishes — and gave us the measure by which 
to judge them. 

Mr. Park described the inspiration that he 
experienced at Oxford — how Oxford fills one 
with the sense of things that are gone, of 
the people that have lived hundreds of years 
before you. He carried about in his pocket 
a small coat of arms with the hope that it 
might soak up and keep for him some of the 
charm, dignity and beauty of the place. 

While abroad Mr. Park acted as translator 
for an Alsatian superman who could do every- 
thing except speak English. Dr. Schweitzer 
was devoting himself to the study of the 
causes of Leprosy and Sleeping Sickness in 
Africa and also of the superstitions of the 
natives. Every child when born is painted 
yellow and given a taboo so that the devil, 
in viewing the situation, will think that the 
taboo will make sufficient trouble in life for the 
baby without any interference on his part. In 
dealing with the people Dr. Schweitzer did 
not try to tell them the foolishness of taboos 
like other missionaries who, by so doing, 
caused the fear that they were instruments of 
the devil and brought about their own death, 



LASELL LEAVES 



but treated them sympathetically. When he 
was asked to name a baby, he called the infant 
Alfred and gave him alcohol as a taboo, know- 
ing that one soul was saved from that curse 
since to break a taboo is worse than death. 

A good fetish must come from one's own 
experience, must be something hard to get at, 
work for, or climb to, and it must be some- 
thing which you continually call to mind. 
There was a noted physician who always 
seemed to maintain his patience, sympathy, 
and poise, no matter how trying his days 
might be. His nurse, wondering at so much 
strength, watched him carefully and noticed 
that ever and anon he would raise his eyes to 
a picture over his mantel — a range of pic- 
turesque mountains in the bluest of Canadian 
skies — and looking would seem to get new life. 
A good fetish must be a resting place for the 
soul when you get to the hard places in life. 



CLASS NIGHT 
ADDRESS OF WELCOME 

Anna Bullock 

A hearty and cordial welcome, dear friends, 
to our Class Night festivities — festivities that 
are as a falling curtain upon the many delight- 
ful activities in which we of '23 as Lasell stu- 
dents have played our part. At this time, 
when our hearts are warm with the spirit of 
loyalty and love for our Alma "Mater, this 
word of greeting extended to you all comes 
from the innermost depths of our hearts and 
expresses our appreciation of your sympathetic 
and kindly interest in us. 

To you, dear parents and guardians, whose 
sacrifice has made possible our very presence 
here tonight, we hasten to offer our fondest of 
welcomes. Though we have not been for- 
tunate enough to have you with us during the 
year, nevertheless we have felt your spirit of 
trust and encouragement constantly hovering 
over us and inspiring us to do our best. Now 
it is with the greatest of pleasure and satis- 
faction that we greet you personally at this 
time when we are about to attain our goal. 

As in the past no Lasell function has been 



complete without you, our beloved Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow, so this Class Night of '23 
would lose much of its significance and joy 
were you not present to grace the occasion. 
Our close association with you during these 
years at Lasell has not only endeared you to 
us, but the memory of your faithful efforts in 
our behalf will inspire us also in the future 
to a lasting loyalty to our dear school. 

Miss Potter, our Mother-friend, no words 
of ours are needed to welcome you to the 
gaieties of this night of nights. To know you 
is to love you ! What would our years have 
amounted to at Lasell without you by our 
sides ever ready to guide and cheer us ? Indeed 
our hearts go out to you in loving appreciation. 

Among those to whom we are delighted to 
give a special word of greeting are you, Mr. 
and Mrs. Towne. You have been our true 
friends from start to finish, ready at all times 
to help us with your kindly advice. How many 
a rough place has been made smooth by your 
cheerful assistance. The recollection of your 
friendly interest in us will remain with us 
forevermore. 

Dear teachers, what a joy it is to have you 
with us tonight. Not only with untiring pa- 
tience and steady effort have you led us into 
the fields of knowledge, but also by your pains- 
taking care and by your personal interest in 
us, you have helped us to have a more earnest 
purpose in life. We shall probably realize the 
full extent of your friendly influence over us 
not so much in the immediate future as in the 
later years, when we have long been absent 
from these sheltering and protecting walls. 

As we glance through this assembly we see 
your friendly faces, comrades and schoolmates, 
sending forth that same radiant spirit of devo- 
tion and good fellowship by which you have 
made our days bright since the beginning of 
the year. We pause a moment to bid you a 
most cordial welcome. It is you, dear friends, 
who, both by your loving and sympathetic 
comradeship and your steadfast loyalty, have 
helped to make this year one never to be for- 
gotten. Your memory will long be cherished. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



To you, Class of '25, our hearts go out in 
especial greeting. Dearest of sisters and most 
loyal of friends, only those who have known 
you as we throughout this past year can com- 
prehend the depth of our affection and devo- 
tion to you. As you have remained true to us 
during these months, so in the long years to 
come will we be true to you, our sisters of '25. 

Seniors of tomorrow, you, too, hold a very 
special place in our affections on this evening, 
both so joyous and yet so sacred to us all. 
May all rivals that we may meet later in life 
have as fine a sense of sportsmanship and fair 
play as you have displayed ! May each and 
every one of you have as wonderful and as 
profitable a Senior year as we have enjoyed. 

Again, as a class of sixty-three Lasell stu- 
dents about to go forth into the world — with 
only the precious memory of our school days 
remaining, we welcome you, one and all, heart- 
ily to the Class Night of '23. 



ROLL CALL 

Josephine Curry 

During this period of our education how 
often have we been summoned to answer from 
breakfast time Monday morning until curfew 
bell on Sunday night the old familiar "Pres- 
ent" to the old familiar roll call. How many 
times and in what peculiar places have we 
gathered in little groups of ten to announce 
our presence to the ever-attending chaperon? 
To onlookers in Symphony Hall, at the thea- 
tres, at the churches, and even in the old South 
Station, how familiar has been the sight. 

And so tonight, girls of '23 answer for the 
last time as Lasell students to the roll call 
of our class. But it has been too big a tempta- 
tion for me and too big a deprivation for you, 
our guests, to pass over each illustrious mem- 
ber of this group without pausing for a mo- 
ment, and giving her the center of the stage. 
Catherine Louise Puckett, Birmingham, Ala. 

Efficiency, speed, "pep" — are a few of the 
many admirable qualities of our Missionary 
Society President, our Dramatic Club Presi- 



dent, and our Senior President. She is, has 

been, and always will be a big girl in Lasell, 

and yet in many ways she is a "Teeny" girl, 

too. 

Anna Carpenter Bullock, Providence, R.I. 

Second proof bearing out scientists' state- 
ment that sandy complexioned people make 
good executives. The best of everything to 
our Vice President ! 
Harriette Mercedes Rendell, Yonkers, N.Y. 

A black notebook, a pencil, a sweet smile and 
an irreproachable disposition are some of the 
ways by which Mer. has kept track of '23. 
Florence Elise Boehmcke, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

We have to admit, Florence, that keeping 
our heavy financial records has been most try- 
ing, and we sincerely hope that you have not 
over-taxed yourself in your efforts to tax us. 
Helen Lucy Lightbody, Rochester, N.H. 

Being song leader is no joke, we know, 
Helen ; in fact it has always been a mystery 
to some of us how, even at 4.30 on dark wintrv 
mornings, you have managed to lead us in 
cheer as well as in voice. 
Rosalie Helen Gruhn, New York, N.Y. 

Woodland is going to miss her ; Bragdon 
will miss her ; and what will Gardner be with- 
out her? Say, girls, here is a riddle: If 
Pinky is "Teeny," what is Rosalie? Give 
up? Why, "Tony," of course! 
Arline Louise Allsopp, Newark, N.J. 

The sweetest girl we know of, and it is not 
all due to the candy she gets, either. 
Virginia Weston Bass, Lancaster, N.H. 

We are worried ! Virginia has not been in 
love for a week ! 
A. Elizabeth Bristow, Lynn, Mass. 

Betty was not given big brown eyes for 
nothing ; she has always managed to "get 
around" us with them, too. But never mind, 
Betty, we have rather liked it ! 
Elizabeth Ida Buettner, 
Helen Theodora Buettner, Chicago, 111. 

'23's pet twins. They are about as much 
alike as F. Scott Fitsgerald and Nathaniel 
Hawthorne. What one lacks the other makes 
up for. 



LASELL LEAVES 



Margaret Elizabeth Bullock, Andover, Mass. 

The class cartoonist. All of the credit goes 
to Margaret for the good looking sketches in 
the Lamp. 
Dorothy Burdick Carey, Watertown, N.Y. 

Dot has always been quiet, but this year she 
has taken on an added quality — that of awe- 
some dignity, which frightens us just a little. 
Florence Elizabeth Chandler, Hudson, Mass. 

Betty has been dieting so steadily that now 
she is almost a "Lightbody." 
Helen Lovet Chapman, Lake Geneva, Wis. 

To look at Helen one would never guess 
that she thought deep thoughts and read 
"Omar Khayyam" ; but she does and we love 
her for it. 
Dorothy Gould Chase, Dorchester, Mass. 

Dot has only been with us a year, but as 
for spirit and service — she has been with us 
always. 
Frances Murray Clark, Plymouth, Mass. 

From the land of the Pilgrims comes demure 
little Frances — but sometimes we wonder ! 
Ethel Josephine Cole, Andover, Mass. 

Another one of our songsters. We are sorry 
that recitals don't come oftener. 

Carolyn Stults Colton, Granby, Conn. 

The evening isn't long enough to enumerate 
all the fine things we know about you, Connie ; 
but when it comes to steadiness, stick-to- 
itiveness and fair play, we all know that your 
place is away up at the top. 
Anne Scott Daugherty, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Have you been fooling us, Anne, with your 
soft voice and gentle manners? Or have we 
really a "professional prom trotter" in our 
midst ? 

Ruth Dinsmore, Belfast, Me. 

We know of many lovely comparisons for 
this demure little miss, but the most suitable, 
we think, is that of a smiling French doll. 
Berenice Gertrude Farber, Chicago, 111. 

Good-naturedness and generosity are B's 
strong points. 
Adrienne Louise Fontaine, Fall River, Mass. 

Many of us will miss you, and we don't 



know just what John McCormack will do 

when you leave Boston. 

Lucy Andrews Fuller, Rockland, Me. 

Everybody enjoys seeing Lucy get letters; 
but she always says, I "Needham." 
Florence May Gifford, Evanston, 111. 

Black hair, snappy eyes, red cheeks and a 
big share of "pep" is often a difficult combina- 
tion, but Florence generally knows how to 
work it. 
Mabel Elizabeth Gleason, Carthage, N.Y. 

Mabel is a wonderful night watchman, ask 
any Junior ! She is also an expert provisioner ; 
no little wanderer ever goes hungry from her 
door. 

Gertrude Gould, Port Washington, L. I. 
Lucy May Kellogg, Hallowell, Me. 

W^e have learned from their roommates that 
they can and have talked. How we wish they 
had demonstrated this ability ! 
Olga Jean Hammell, Atlantic City, N.J. 

Olga must have caught some of the atmos- 
phere of her town ; we have never seen her 
when she wasn't pleasant. 
Ruth Folger Hight, Ashmont, Mass. 

Oh, Ruthie, don't you ever slip — don't you 
ever get the least bit mad, or improper? You 
are continually at the "Hight" of dignity. 
Ruth Hills, Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Cow-boy Ruth ! What would Yellowstone 
Park do without her? 
Helen Alberta Hinshaw, Kansas City, Mo. 

One of our stage-smitten members ! No 
dramatic program is complete without her 
name. 
Ruth Watson Hopkins, Ft. Fairfield, Me. 

Ruth is a Senior from the ground up. Be- 
sides having this enviable distinction she is 
pretty much of an artist, too. 
Mira Wallace Huggins, Lockport, N. Y. 

Steady, easy-going Mira; but she can make 
a Remington or an Underwood "sit up and 
take notice." 
Christine Price Lalley, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Good old Chris ! How many fond, fluttering 
Junior hearts has Chris fluttered with, flirted 
with, and then left frazzled ? 



^ 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



Marjorie Eastman Lowell, Marlboro, Mass. 

Let us see, Marj. what is the past tense of 
wilt? Walt, isn't it? 
Ida Anna Markert, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Ida has many characteristics which we might 
well imitate. Best of luck, Ida, in your future 
work! 
Dorothy Miller May, New York, N.Y. 

Dot has not been here very long, but we 
hope that Lasell has meant much to her. 
Cathleen Ivan Meloon, Portsmouth, N.H, 

Once this year for five whole days we didn't 
see Cathleen and her shadow, Virginia ; but it 
was all right — they were at her home together ! 
Antoinette Cecilia Meritt, Dorchester,. Mass. 

The lady we have to thank for our good 
looking Senior stationery ; but has she been 
working with some thought of the future? 
Jean Merrick, Elizabeth, N.J. 

Owning and operating the longest and most 
efficient "line" in school. Long may it pull, 
Jean ! 
Dorothy Flavia Merwin, Windsor, Conn. 

Another one of the sweetest girls in '23. 
But she does have such trouble with her bills, 
and they are not all the payable kind, are they, 
Dot? 
Mary Ann Miller, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Singing, "jazzing" Mary Ann ! May all 
those dreams of stageland come true. 
Dorothy King Millspaugh, Walden, N.Y. 

Dot just gives the impression of being shy. 
She surely is efficient — just ask any one who 
went to Prom, and ate that wonderful food. 
Elizabeth Mitchell, Norfolk, Va. 

A big per cent of whatever success '23 has 
made is due to the competent management of 
our Athletic Association President. 
Elizabeth Lydia Neal, Lynn, Mass. 

There are a great many nice things we could 
say about you, Betty, but might we sum it all 
up by saying that you are the best sport we 
ever met ! 
Bonnie Fraser Orlady, Durand, Wis. 

You have puzzled a few of us this year, 
Bonnie, but then, mystery only lends enchant- 
ment. 



Claire Parker, West Barnstable, Mass. 

Yes, Claire, it was the telephone, needless 
for any of us to say ; but oh, Claire, that Cape 
Cod accent ! 
Helen Franklin Phillips, Woods Hole, Mass. 

Another famous member of the "Old 
Guard." Once again we ask the Class of '24 
whether this is not true. 
Esther Consuelo Pizzini, San Antonio, Texas. 

Big-hearted, jolly, and likable is our Texan 
representative. 
Norma Prentis, Allston, Mass. 

How so much ginger can be condensed into 
such a tiny girl we have often wondered; but 
Norma has supplied spice and seasoning for 
many a tasteless enterprise. 
Helen Gertrude Reardon, Brighton, Mass. 

Few of us have ever really gotten acquainted 
with Helen, but what we do know of her we 
like. 
Mary Evelyn Shidler, South Bend, Ind. 

One of our dearest class babies, but an all- 
round, regular girl, too ! 
Adrienne Estelle Smith, Auburndale,. Mass. 

This present day age of young people has 
been the cause of a great deal of worry to 
many people, especially to this member of our 
class. But don't worry, Adrienne, we'll come 
out on top, yet. 
Lovina Fowler Smith, Spencer, Ind. 

"Modern Literature Class" wouldn't survive 
without Dell's presence. The most studious 
and painstaking member of a class distin- 
guished for its scholarly attainments. 
Ruth Sarah Seidel Throm, Reading, Pa. 

Never to our knowledge have we seen Ruth 
without a dozen specials, letters and telegrams. 
But we could at least be nasty enough to say 
that the rest of us do not have so much trouble 
in keeping up with our correspondence. 
Louisa Carrington Venable, Norfolk, Va. 

Here would be another chance for us to 
enumerate a long list of successful achieve- 
ments were the evening less short. All the 
luck in the world to you, Louie, one of the 
finest girls in '23. 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



Jessie AVatters, New London, Conn. 

Jessie is very quiet, but she always manages 
to get there ; many school activities will miss 
her support. 
Isabelle Whitcomb, Essex Junction, Vt. 

What will Gardner do without Isabelle to 
create a little excitement with a cut, bruise, or 
bump of some kind to be tied up ! 
Doris Ann Wilde, N. Andover, Mass. 

One of Miss Potter's mildest "little doves," 
notwithstanding her "Wilde" origin. 
Priscilla Mary Wolfe, Canton, Mass. 

'23's little tom-boy ! We'll never forget that 
toboggan slide last winter, Prill, and we guess 
that you never will, either. 
Alice Louise Woolley, Salem, Mass. 

The class politician ! Sometime we are 
going to reform and reorganize Tammany 
Hall with Louise as "Boss." 
Josephine Curry, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

After bringing before you such a collection 
of unparalleled celebrities I shall not seek to 
"Curry" favor for myself by any plea of merit. 
Instead I shall merely follow the custom of 
every well trained Lasell girl and answer 
"Present." 



To-night, ah, friends, we shall not soon forget; 
For on this eve a solemn pledge we take 
To guard our memories well of dear Lasell 
And of old joys new visions make. 
Not joy alone we have, but hope and trust; 
Our future close at hand divides us as it must; 
But we are held in bonds our pledge makes bright 
That we Lift High the Torch always, as here 
to-night. 



CLASS POEM 

Helen Chapman 

THE TORCH 
The Torch ! significant the name of all we hold 
In arts, in dreams, in lore of sages gone! 
These gifts and more those men of olden days 
Have handed down to sons of a new dawn. 
And so to keep the light of learning bright 
That has come down as an inheritance, 
We take the torch and lift it high, 
Insure its place an age long permanence. 
Such was our challenge ; such, our boast ; 
Not spoken in pride and foolish self-conceit, 
But made in courage to go forth and meet 
With victory, defeat — 
Thus hope we, '23. 

Lasell as medium 'twixt the old and new, 
Gave glimpses bright into the Sibyl's fire, 
Doing her share to show us ways of life 
To follow which she did our souls inspire. 
And having seen what so far has been done, 
And having heard what there is left to do, 
We look upon the world as we come forth 
And lift above our heads with vigor new 
Our lighted Torch. 



MEMENTOES 
Louisa Venable 

Sister Class, you who have been so true and 
faithful to us throughout this year, it is with 
sad hearts that the Class of 1923 faces the 
hour of separation. Sophomores, you are 
very dear to us ; never shall we forget your 
love and loyalty. Not once have you failed to 
serve us. The many thoughtful things that 
you have done to make the Seniors happy have 
been genuinely appreciated. Tonight we leave 
with each of you these presents — tiny gifts 
by which you may always be reminded of the 
love that Twenty-Three bears her "Baby 
Sisters." 

And now, members of the Class of 1924, 
dear Junior rivals, I consider it a pleasure and 
honor to be allowed the privilege of standing 
here and addressing you. We have met be- 
fore. Still well do I recall that night early 
last November when I had my first introduc- 
tion to 1924 as an assembled body: It was an 
occasion worth remembering, a Senior wel- 
comed so warmly into that intimate group of 
Juniors and given such a delightful ride — to 
say nothing of a short stroll afterwards — at 
your expense. You have been dear to me ever 
since, oh, Juniors ! Before you reach that 
state of dignified seniorhood it is my duty this 
evening to leave with some of your members 
small gifts. They are to remind you of mis- 
takes and "faux pas" made on numerous occa- 
sions in spite of excellent judgment, discretion, 
and knowledge shown at other times. 

Mary O'Hare — It is embarrassing, Mary, 
for me to have to give you this check. I hate 
to pay for a ride so enjoyable as the one your 
class gave me. But we know how you ex- 
hausted the class treasury to pay for your 
private taxi — to say nothing of the divine 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



trucks that carried the other members of your 
class to Wellesley and Junior elections. As 
knowing Seniors, we therefore feel duty 
bound to help you out. So "from the Bank 
of Experience and Knowledge we pay to the 
order of Mary O'Hare a large amount of com- 
mon sense." 

Well, well, here we have with us Jumpy, 
the jolliest, jumpingest of Juniors ! Always 
on the jump, during the last two years you 
have earned your name. You have jumped on 
numerous occasions, but usually after every- 
thing was over — never in time to prevent the 
Seniors from accomplishing anything. So we 
give you this jumping Jack to remind you of 
those times after you have become a staid and 
solemn Senior. 

To you, Jocelyn, with your clever notices 
to post on bulletin boards, with your marvelous 
plan of day and night shifts, with your time 
clocks, etc., to prevent Seniors from taking 
tables — (but we must mention here that even 
they were not clever enough to outdo the 
Merry Widow of 1923) — also with your 
whimsical remarks, we give you this Jester's 
cap — the wit of the Junior class ! 

Louise Orr, the patient waiter of Lasell. 
For one, two, three, four years she has always 
been the one to welcome old girls and to show 
all the "ropes" of the place. Tomorrow you 
will be a Senior, after waiting all these years, 
so we give to you a diploma as a goal to strive 
for during next year. Good luck to you ! 

Helen Schroer — In years before this, it has 
become the custom at Class Night to slam the 
Juniors because they have lacked "pep." But 
1924 has certainly a wonderful "pep" in you. 
Never too tired to play the piano, writing one 
good "peppy" song after another, you have 
won the admiration of the entire Senior Class. 
So we compliment the Junior Class on the 
"Peppiest Pep" Lasell has ever known in 
Helen Schroer. 

Frances Badger, Bertha Krakauer — In spite 
of the Jester, Jumpy, and Pep we have heard 
rumors of much feeling between the political 
parties of the Junior Class, so to you two, rep- 
resenting Main Building and Woodland, I give 



a remedy, guaranteeing that it will do away 
with previous quarrels and differences of opin- 
ions — a tube of glue, — during your Senior year 
may you not fail to stick together. 



FAREWELL 

Louise Puckett 

Our Class Night is almost at an end, but be- 
fore we say Farewell let us think for a moment 
about the period we have spent here together. 
For some it has been two years, for some three 
and for some four. How reluctant we were 
to leave our homes ! How the weeks before 
we could return seemed to stretch on and on ! 
The environment was new, the manner of life 
untried and the faces unfamiliar. 

Time changes all, and not many weeks 
passed before we had come to love those 
things which we had at first thought strange or 
unpleasant. Soon we were a big, happy fam- 
ily, living together in close companionship, 
which as the years have slipped by has grown 
more precious. And so now as the time for 
departure draws near we realize what this in- 
timate association means to us. In our desire 
to prolong it we wish that Father Time were 
not quite so old ; or that it had been possible 
for him to stay the flight of the months all too 
quickly passed. What would we give to go 
over them all again? Once to us Class Night 
seemed in the dim future, now it is upon us 
and soon it will be a cherished memory. Al- 
most as from a dream we are awakened by the 
sad realization that the time has come when we 
must say good-bye to every one and everything 
that has meant so much to us. We who have 
been united for a whole year must part, never 
again to come together in the same group. 
Some we shall meet in the future ; others we 
may not see ; but not one shall we forget ! 

We are very grateful for the high example 
and splendid leadership we have had in our be- 
loved Principal and his wife, Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow, it is with deep regret that we say 
good-bye to you. Know that our appreciation 
of your unfailing courtesy and generosity is 
deep and genuine. 

Miss Potter, you have constantly been our 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Joy and inspiration. To know that there was 
some one to whom we could go with our prob- 
lems, some one who would understand, has 
brought us comfort. As we say farewell to 
you we cherish the hope that you may make 
Lasell days for future girls as happy as you 
have made them for us. 

Mr. and Mrs. Towne, your kindly interest 
in our progress and our welfare is gratefully 
recalled now in this hour of parting, and will 
many times recur to our minds ! Many of our 
pleasures and much of our success, both as 
Juniors and as Seniors at Lasell, we owe to 
you. 

Dear teachers, in one sense we are not say- 
ing goodbye to you, for what you have done 
for us has become a part of ourselves. In 
home and community life we shall take our 
places more wisely and successfully because 
you have given us practical training, because 
you have shown us some desirable things in 
the realms of the mind and spirit. 

Seniors of tomorrow, Class of '24, dear 
Juniors, we have enjoyed your friendly rivalry 
this year. By keeping close watch upon us 
you have inspired us to do what was expected 
both as students and as leaders in school activ- 
ities. We want you to think of us next year ; 
for many times our thoughts will wander back 
to Lasell and especially to you who are to fill 
our places. In saying good-bye, we hope that 
you may, as we have done, find your last year 
at Lasell a fulfillment of all your desires and 
anticipations. 

Sophomores, you have ever been devoted 
to the cause of your Senior sisters. There is 
an inexpressible sadness in our hearts tonight, 
as '23 bids you farewell, dear little sisters ! 

Schoolmates, it has been good to know you. 
Often we shall find ourselves thinking of you 
and of the happy days spent here together. 
We know that in your care the name of the 
Alma Mater we all love will be well guarded. 
Any standards which we may have failed to 
reach, you must strive to attain. 

Class of 1923, "Lasell Days are Nearly 
Over," and we leave behind us the land of its 
happy school life. Now, because Fate has so 



decreed it, there is a separate path for each 
of us ; but we shall not really be separated, 
for the experiences of this happy year togeth- 
er have established among us an indestructible 
friendship, and its memories will serve to keep 
our hearts forever united. You have been 
faithful, '23, and I may indeed say a loyal 
band, "Bound firm by a bond unbroken." 
Dear '23, Farewell ! 



FAREWELL TO BRAGDON 

Dorothy G. Chase 

As tonight we bid farewell to you, dear 
Bragdon Hall, our hearts indeed "swell with 
undying love." It is fitting that to you we 
should first pay tribute, for you have been the 
heart of all our school work and activities. 

In the classrooms you have offered us those 
things which give skill of hand, strength of 
body, and alertness of mind. In the chapel 
where we have gathered for morning worship 
we have learned some of life's deeper lessons. 
We think, too, of the lectures, musicales, and 
plays that you have thrown open for our en- 
joyment or for our profit. 'Tis beneath your 
wide spreading roof-tree that the underclass- 
men have cheerfully given us of their hospi- 
tality. In the dining-room we have enjoyed 
the feasting and revelry as only Lasell girls 
can. Here it was that some time before Eas- 
ter, we, Seniors, gathered to enjoy the closing 
weeks around our own tables. 

Bragdon Hall, as we recount your priceless 
gifts, there comes to us the thought of our 
dear Miss Potter, who has been a guide 
through many a perplexity. We shall never 
forget the helpful Sunday evening meetings 
in her room, where we, who had come with 
tired and hopeless hearts, found so much rest 
and comfort. 

Many other rooms are dear to us, but none 
holds more precious associations than our 
Senior Room, — a place of our very own, where 
we could be alone to plan and work out our 
class problems! May the Seniors-to-be prize 
it as much as we have. 

Dear Bragdon, we bless you for the mem- 
ories, — the lasting friendships; for friends 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



have played a large part in this life within your 
kindly halls. There have come changes in this 
past year. Through illness some have left us, 
but this night we are thinking of them. We 
wish we might have shared their friendship 
and love for a longer time. 

Now, dear Bragdon Hall, our Student Home 
on the Hill, as an unbroken band we, the class 
of '23, may never see you again ; — but, through 
all the years to come, your influence will shine 
forth as a guiding light and you, yourself, will 
stand as a symbol of service to others. 



FAREWELL TO CARPENTER 

Louise Woollcy 

The old adage, "Parting is such sweet sor- 
row," can certainly not be applied to this par- 
ticular instance ; for tonight as we stand be- 
fore you, dear Carpenter, in this moment of 
parting, we find no sweetness in the sorrow. 
We realize that the time has at last come when 
we must bid good-bye to the house we love so 
well ; to the house that has offered us such pro- 
tecting shelter all through this year ; to the 
house that to us all has been "Home." 

We have come to love you, Carpenter, love 
every room within your old walls. With re- 
luctant hearts we turn from you tonight, and 
say farewell forever to the many good times 
enjoyed here throughout the year. They are 
but memories now, — memories that will live 
forever in our minds and hearts. We shall 
cherish them always as we often recall our 
happy Lasell days. 

We have been twenty-four of the jolliest 
Carpenterites that ever graced the campus — ■ 
living together as one big family, sharing one 
another's joys and griefs, and day by day com- 
ing into a better understanding through our 
close association. At night, after study hour, 
your walls have resounded with the mirth and 
laughter of your carefree children. How si- 
lent you stood throughout it all, — yet some- 
how we knew that you, too, were enjoying it 
fully as much as we. 

Our complete happiness was marred, how- 
ever, by the departure of two of our merry 
family- It was with heavy hearts that we saw 



Miss Woodward leave us, — she who was for- 
merly a loyal Lasell girl, and later our help- 
mate, adviser, teacher and friend. It was 
with tear-filled eyes that we saw the familiar 
objects of her room disappear from sight. 
Her leaving was not only a loss to you, dear 
Carpenter, and to your girls, but to every 
member of Lasell. Our love and best wishes 
will follow her always. Too, we have missed 
the cheery companionship of Dot Barnard, the 
only member of '23 to wear a cap and gown 
and not to receive her diploma. Owing to ill- 
ness, she was forced to leave us, and it was not 
easy to see her go. We shall recall her often 
as one of '23's leading "songsters." 

To Miss Coggeshall and Mrs. Saunders, our 
loving house-mothers, we owe much. They 
have helped us in everything, — sympathized 
with us in our difficulties and joined in our fun 
as good sports. By keeping us contented and 
happy, they have succeeded in making '23's 
Senior year one to be cherished ; so tonight as 
we stand united, we take this opportunity to 
express to them our appreciation and love. 

Reluctantly now we realize that all our good 
times enjoyed with you are over, dear Car- 
penter. Yet we feel that when some day we 
return to you, you will welcome us in your 
old cordial way, and will afford us rest and 
contentment, such as we have found with you 
during the swiftly passing months. To your 
future children, — Seniors of tomorrow and 
years to come, — we take this opportunity to 
express the hope that their days spent within 
your walls may be as happy as ours. But now 
the moment has come ! With heavy hearts we 
pause in our evening of revelry, — pause — and 
remembering always how we loved you, — • 
Farewell, dear Carpenter, Farewell. 



FAREWELL TO GARDNER 

Norma Prentis 
Gardner, dear, the time has come when we 
must say farewell to you who have sheltered 
us so safely throughout this memorable year. 
Now that the hour is at hand, we realize how 
deeply love for you has been instilled in our 
hearts. 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



We are filled with a yearning to live again 
onr year as Seniors. Dear Gardner, if this 
great desire were to be fulfilled, perhaps we 
would leave undone some things for which we 
are sorry and would perform many little acts 
which we have thoughtlessly neglected. Our 
fond memory and love for you, however, dom- 
inate all haunting regrets. 

This year has been one of happiness, nur- 
tured by the warmth of friendship which in 
days to come will grow more strong and 
staunch. What happy hours we have spent 
by your hearth ! What jolly times we have 
enjoyed with our classmates ! What gay music 
and merry laughter have resounded through 
your spacious halls ! What loving guidance 
we have had from our dear teachers, Miss 
Wright and Miss Ells ! How grateful we are 
to you for these privileges ! Sad, indeed, we 
are at the realization that they are no longer 
ours, for we must say good-bye. 

As subjects come kneeling at the feet of a 
queen, to pay due homage, so '23 is now gath- 
ered at your threshold to offer to you her last 
tribute — loyalty forever, Dear Gardner, Fare- 
well ! 



FLAME SPEECH 

Christine Lalley 

What a great gift Prometheus secured for 
mankind when, ascending to heaven, he lighted 
his torch at the chariot of the sun and brought 
down fire. The real value of this great achieve- 
ment was but little recognized in that far-off 
mythical time, but throughout the succeeding 
ages men have come to realize its life-giving 
and sustaining power. Much, too, has been 
learned of the evil as well as the beneficial uses 
of fire. Tonight, however, I am not to tell of 
myths or legends, but I am to speak of fire 
and its greatest meaning to us Lasell girls who 
are gathered here to observe a time-honored 
rite. 

To us tonight this fire symbolizes the com- 
plete destruction of all that has brought us dis- 
tress or annoyance. Our Lasell days have 
been the happiest ones of our youth, but as in 
every period of life there are bound to be dis- 



couragements to meet and unpleasant tasks 
to perform, so here, too, there have been 
trials and vexations, but in order that we may 
forget every unpleasant moment spent here 
we are to follow a splendid custom and make 
an end to our small troubles by flinging them 
into this devouring flame. Thus when we 
leave this spot all prejudices we may have had 
through our all too quickly passed Lasell days 
will have become extinct, and all associations 
with things of a disagreeable nature, even our 
ungenerous thoughts, will die out, and once 
cast into flame can never be revived. 

These smouldering embers signify also the 
passing of our school days. From the dead 
ashes may there rise thoughts of our school 
which are kind, generous, joyous, but above 
all, loyal and true to our Alma Mater. May 
we go forth cherishing a love for her which 
shall kindle a flame of affection in the hearts 
of those who may follow us. And may the 
bright light of honor and truth be reflected 
from us, when we no longer can look to her 
so constantly for Cheer and for Radiance. 

As the last spark of this flame dies out and 
its smoke passes away forever, may every 
haunting or unpleasant thought, word, or deed 
fade from our memory FOREVER, and we, — 
the class of 1923, — pledge ourselves to build a 
brighter, happier flame of Love and Loyalty 
for our Alma Mater — Dear Lasell. 



FLAME SPEECH 

Betty Mitchell 
I 
They were always taking exercises ; 
They were always on a diet ; 
And the constant talk among their friends 
Was the way pounds vanished by it. 

II 
"Say, how much have you lost this week?" 
Could be heard day after day; 
Or, "I've planned to start dieting this noon, 
So I must see what I weigh." 

Ill 

Thus it went on from girl to girl, 
Til to lose weight became a fad. 
Money for candy was spent no more, — 
My, what a saving for Dad! 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



IV 
How fast those pounds did disappear ! 
They fell off left and right; 
But I have found their hiding place 
And have brought them here tonight. 

V 
Oh, wondrous flame a-sparkling so, 
I now will increase your treasure 
By adding this weight to your mass of light; 
Its burden has given no pleasure ! 



EFFIGY OF GARDNER'S CAT 

Betty Neal 
She comes to my room at eleven each night, 
Sneaking around with her eyes shining bright, 
Jumps up on the bed and 'bout scares me to death- 
While I lie there so still, just gasping for breath. 
This isn't a ghost — no, nothing like that — 
It's only dear Gardner's beloved oV cat, 

Our Percy. 

To live on "first floor" and have this little pest 
Climb in through the window and walk on the desk, 
And tip over the ink and spoil all that's in sight — ■ 
The work that you've done the previous night — 
Theme papers ruined, note-books destroyed, 
No wonder this cat we always avoid, 

Our Percy. 

And what would you do if a rustle you heard 

In your waste-paper basket at midnight ? My word ! 

You'd think of all sorts of things, burglars and 

spooks,. 
And perhaps, if you dared to, you'd throw a few 

books. 
Then a piercing "meow" as four feet pitter pat — 
And you'd realize again, 'twas that horrid ol' cat, 

Our Percy. 

Now perhaps you will think it most cruel of me 
To throw into the flames poor Percy ; but see 
How much trouble she's made, how she's scared us 

this year ; 
Reason that out, you'll not think me so queer. 
She has done some good, she has done some harm, 
Nov/ she'll be going to "Kitty Cat's Farm," 

Our Percy. 



FLAME SPEECH 

Betty Chandler 
Old Clock of Carpenter Hall, your duties 
have been unceasing this year. Disturber of 
our slumbers, controller of our waking hours, 
you have hustled us to our meals ; driven us to 
our classes ; ordered us in spite of our pro- 



tests to study hour, thus shortening our even- 
ing revelries. 

Perhaps you have done your best. Never- 
theless secure in our Senior retreat you have 
been a law unto yourself, paying too little heed 
to what other school clocks were saying. Your 
face, apparently so frank and honest, has 
failed to inspire our confidence. With an al- 
most cyncial grin you have gazed upon us as 
we have dashed madly for the dining-room, 
horror stricken at the realization that because 
of you we should probably be members of 
Monday morning study hall. Again when the 
fancy seized you to be ahead of time with 
what triumphant glee you have watched us 
rush out the door, only to find when we 
reached Bragdon, that we had at least one half 
minute to spare. 

So now, old clock, we are through with you 
and your deceitful glances, and that you may 
never annoy the class of twenty-four as you 
have troubled us, into the flames I shall fling 
you. Joyfully we listen to their snapping and 
crackling, as we realize that your intriguing 
and scheming countenance will forever be ab- 
sent from Carpenter Hall. 



FLAME SPEECH 

Margaret Bullock 

Beware ! Do not open the lid, for within 
this chest are many petty CHILLS ! I en- 
trust to the Flames the key, also, for with it 
some inquisitive lass would fain satisfy her de- 
sire to see these frigid creatures. There are 
many of them. During the long, cold winter 
days who among us did not shiver again and 
again, especially while climbing the hill to Main 
in the early morning? At the time of the tak- 
ing of our caps and gowns, did not many ex- 
perience a nervous apprehension, the chills 
creeping up our backbones lest there be some 
slip somewhere? Then how often before 
those terrific exams, were we petrified with 
dread at the possibility of forfeiting these in- 
signia of dignity ? Yes, and those icy looks of 
the underclassmen, left in mid-air ! 

And so, little chest of CHILLS, I give you 
to the heat of the Flames. Farewell ! 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



COMMENCEMENT DAY 
Our last Chapel was opened by a service of 
praise and worship, after which Dr. Winslow 
read a long list of eagerly awaited announce- 
ments : 

PRIZES AND CERTIFICATES 

NUMERALS FOR TRACK 

Awarded to the girls winning ten or more 

points for their respective classes : 

Freshman 

Helen Mclntire 

Field Day Cup 

Specials. Cup remains at Lasell 

WINNING CREW 
Each member of the crew received an L. 

Lucy Fuller 

Evelyn Shidler 

Priscilla Wolfe 

Louise Puckett 

Carolyn Colton 
The following received Bars as they were 
members of the Winning Crew of 1922 : 

Elizabeth Mitchell, Captain 

Rosalie Gruhn 

Helen Buettner 

Elizabeth Buettner 
Each member of the different crews received 
L. C. C.'s, the letters being presented each of 
the captains of the respective crews : 
Senior Second Crew 

Mary Ann Miller 

Isabelle Whitcomb 

Margaret Bullock 

Arline Allsopp 

Jeannette Merrick 

Gertrude Gould 

Bars 

Florence Boehmcke, Captain 

Elizabeth Neal 

Berenice Farber 

Junior 1st Crew 

Anne McDavitt 

Helen Strauss 

Naomi Jaffe 

Gertrude Westerhoff 

Lydia Parry 

Marietta Chase 

Elizabeth Anderson 



Bars 
Margaret Bunnell, Captain 
Lucile Norris 

Junior 2nd Crew 
Katharine Webb, Captain 
Mary O'Hare 
Brenda Copeland 
Sylvia Starr 
Elizabeth Frick 
Helen Robson 
Olive Lunny 
Gertrude Wragg 

Bars 
Eleanor Averill 

Junior White Crew 
Lois Gottlieb, Captain 
Isabel Lummus 
Doris Woodruff 
Esther Adams 
Maud Wilcox 
Louise Titus 
Phyllis Hessin 
Grace Brinkerhofr 
Marjorie Aitken 

Mixed Crew 
Eva-May Mortimer, Captain 
Helene Berkson 
Marjorie Wilcox 
Christine Chamberlain 
Esther Harvey 
Louise Mueller 
Edna Hart 
Jessie Matteson 
Ruth Dunning 
Nadine Strong 

TENNIS 
The following received T's; 
Jocelyn Tong 
Dorothy Redman 
Berenice Farber 

Bars 
Elizabeth Mitchell 
Ruth Hight 
As winner of the cup for 1922, Elizabeth 
Mitchell is presented with a Pin and her name 
is engraved for the second time on the cup 
remaining at Lasell. 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



BASKET BALL 
Each member who played an outside team 

for an entire game received an L. 
Edith Clendenin 
Ella Robbins 
Lydia Parry 
Anne McDavitt 
Dorothy Redman 
Helen Stryker 
Margaret Bunnell 
Pauline Gagne 
Alyce Dick 
Grace Brinkerhoff 
Leonora Belber 
Helen Cummings 
Elizabeth Neal 

Bars 
Elizabeth Mitchell, Captain 
Carolyn Colton 

HOCKEY 
Each member of the team received L. 

Edith Hadley 
Helen Buettner 
Elizabeth Buettner 
Frances Badger 
Eva-May Mortimer 
Lois Gottlieb 
Helen Mclntire 
Miriam Belber 

Bars 
Elizabeth Mitchell, Captain 
Carolyn Colton 
Berenice Farber 

EXTRA CREDITS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

2nd Semester 

Elizabeth Mitchell 2 

Sylvia Starr 2 

Olga Hammell 2 

Hazel Small 2 

Helen Schroer 2 

STUDENT COUNCIL PINS 
These girls receive a gold pin for serving 

four terms : 

Carolyn Colton, President 
Anna Bullock 

CERTIFICATES 
STENOGRAPHY 
Ruth Hopkins 

Mabel Bavier 
Ruth Godley 



TYPEWRITING 

Isabelle Whitcomb 
Lois Gottlieb 
Sylvia Levi 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING 

Mabel Gleason 
Helen Cummings 
Isabelle Varney 

ALL SUBJECTS OF SECRETARIAL TRAINING 
COURSE 

Florence Boehmcke 

Mira Huggins 

Antoinette Meritt 

Elizabeth Mitchell 

Doris Wilde 

Louise Woolley 

ACADEMIC MUSIC COURSE 

Major Subjects — Voice and Piano 
Etbel Josephine Cole 
Helen Lucy Lightbody 

Major Subject — Voice 
A. Elizabeth Bristow 
Adrienne Louise Fontaine 

Major Subject — Piano 
Naomi Margaret Davis 

HOME ECONOMICS 
Dorothy Carey 
Frances Clarke 
Carolyn Colton 
Lucy Fuller 
Lucy Kellogg 
Marjorie Lowell 
Cathleen Meloon 
Jeanette Merrick 
Dorothy Merwin 
Dorothy Millspaugh 
Louise Puckett 
Mercedes Rendell 
Evelyn Shidler 
Priscilla Wolfe 

BREAD PRIZES 

1st Prize, Dorothy Millspaugh 
2nd Prize, Elizabeth Buettner 

Honorable Mention 
1st, Dorothy Carey 
2nd, Catherine Lalley 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



POST GRADUATE SEALS 
Harriette Case 12 credits 

Marjorie Gifford 8 credits 

Naomi Davis 5 credits 

SCHOLARSHIP PRIZES 

1st Prize (two years) 

Elizabeth Mitchell 92%% 

2nd Prize (two years) 

Antoinette Meritt 90^% 

Honorable Mention 

Anna Bullock 87^% 

Jessie Watters 87^% 

Honorable Mention for one year (Senior year) 

Florence Boehmcke 88 5/6% 

SWEATERS 

"One girl out of a hundred !" 

An "all-round" Lasell girl — chosen from 
character shown this year — each girl had 
a chance to earn one sweater. 
Requirements — Good standing in studies. 
Good standing in athletics. 
Good winner and better loser. 
Good influence, thoughtful. 
Democratic, good "mixer." 
Good health and personal ap- 
pearance. 
Appearance of room. 
No habit of breaking rules. 
No dishonorable acts. 
Every girl carefully considered. The way 
in which each girl handled her specific respon- 
sibilities this year has "told the tale." 
Carolyn Colton 
Louise Puckett 
Frances Badger 

Honorable Mention 
Helen Hinshaw 
Edith Clendenin 
Lasell made a new departure this year in 
awarding to Elizabeth Mitchell the highest 
honor ever paid a student by our Principal 
Not only did she lead the school in scholar- 
ship and fulfill the Lasell sweater require- 
ments for two years, but her unfailing loyalty 
was so marked that faculty and students alike 
were glad to have our Principal pay this un- 
usual honor to one who so signally merited it. 
The prize gift was a gold fountain pen. 



COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 

Rev. Ernest Graham Guthrie 
I want to speak to you this morning for a 
few minutes on a rather elusive, but, I think, 
a very important topic for many of us here 
today, viz. : our Castles in Spain. Sometimes 
we are offered a penny for our thoughts when 
they seem far away. But they cannot be 
bought for a penny, often, let us admit it, be- 
cause they are engaged on things too ignoble 
or trivial for us to recall to others ; and often 
again because they are engaged on things too 
intimate and personal to be bought with a 
penny. We are building our Castles in Spain, 
and building them out of what seems the most 
unsubstantial material, out of hidden desires 
the goal of which we cannot ourselves define, 
or secret hopes which perhaps no one but we 
ourselves know. And yet, unsubstantial as 
these castles are, by them our present life is 
continually fed and to make them substantial, 
in one form or another, the total powers of 
life must be given. 

There is a book that has just been published 
entitled "The Genius of America," by Stuart 
P. Sherman. If I could persuade every mem- 
ber of the graduating class to read it this 
summer I should feel that I had done perhaps 
the largest service that I could do for you to- 
day. Somewhere in that book he tells us that 
one of the most interesting and intelligent 
members of a graduating class came to talk 
to him, as she said, about her future. "I 
have spent," she said, "four years at the Uni- 
versity; now they want me to go home and 
marry and settle down and be just a good 
woman. My home town will sweep over me 
and swallow up everything that I have learned 
in my years here. I don't want to be a good 
woman!" "What do you want to be?" her 
teacher inquired. She could not phrase her 
answer promptly. But she had both arms ex- 
tended towards the infinite, that was all. That 
gesture of hungry discontent, as her teacher 
knew, was a token of the most hopeful kind 
that education was "taking"; but its vagueness 
indicated that her education was still incom- 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



plete. She had begun to feel what Emerson 
calls youth's "thirst for a real existence for 
an object," but had not found that "something 
great and good" in the service of which that 
thirst shall be satisfied. 

Now I am not so unwise as to think that I 
know or can even imagine what your Castles 
in Spain are like ; but I do wish that I might 
suggest today something worthy for their 
plan, and just one or two things that are need- 
ed for their realization. 

First, with regard to the plan, let us hold 
as our highest purpose to be the greatest kind 
of human being that we can be. We are all 
agreed that a human being needs education, 
but as a wise man has warned us, education 
has more various aims than we usually recog- 
nize and the fundamental question for all of us 
is "Education for what?" 

There is, first of all, the education that de- 
signs to make us capable of earning our liveli- 
hood in this vast industrial and commercial 
system of which we are a part. For a world 
of newspapers and business we need the arts 
or reading, writing and figuring. If we are to 
enter the world of industry we need an enor- 
mous amount of technical information and 
training which is being amply provided today. 
And I should not say a word of disparage- 
ment with regard to the purpose of this form 
of education. It is a great thing to be able to 
play our part effectively in the world's vast 
labor house. "A really skillful dressmaker," 
it has been quaintly but truly said, "could wipe 
away as many tears from human eyes as any 
sister of charity." And yet, if we have no 
larger purpose for our life than this we are 
in danger of being ultimately reduced to little 
more than a cog in the great wheels of the 
world's industry. 

On a tombstone in a cemetery in France 
this script was carved beneath the name, "He 
was born a man ; he died a grocer." It is not 
easy to escape such a destiny. One of the 
most discerning critics of our national life, 
who spent forty years as a student and pro- 
fessor in Harvard University, said that the 



great industrial and commercial system that 
dominates our modern life has a power to 
mold men greater than the university ; and 
that the bulk of its graduates, after ten years 
in the commercial world, have lost almost 
every evidence that they have been educated 
for anything more than to be a part of the 
commercial system. 

There is, therefore, a second form of educa- 
tion that designs to increase our capacity to 
enjoy for its own sake all that is good and 
beautiful and true in the world. Anatole 
France makes one of his greatest characters, 
an old scholar, give noble expression to this 
aim of education. "One comes into this 
world," he says, "to enjoy what is beautiful 
and what is good, and to do as one pleases 
when the things one wants to do are noble, in- 
telligent, and generous." In his mind that is 
what the noblest form of education is ; it is the 
true cultivation of the powers of mind, heart, 
and will, to enjoy all that God has given us to 
enjoy. "If that child," he goes on, referring 
to the young girl whose training is being dis- 
cussed, "if that child were entrusted to my 
care, I would make of her a child of bright in- 
telligence and full of life, in whom every- 
thing beautiful in art or nature would awaken 
some responsive thrill. I would teach her to 
live in sympathy with all that is beautiful — - 
lovely landscapes, the ideal scenes of poetry 
and history, the emotional charm of noble 
music. I would make lovable to her every- 
thing I would wish her to love." 

It is by our sheer disinterested love of the 
great things of life that a liberal education is 
both tested and justified, and if I were given 
the opportunity to stand again where some of 
you are standing today, I would make my life- 
election very different. I would not ask of 
every subject, ""What is it going to do to help 
me to earn my livelihood?" I think I would 
take many subjects whose direct bearing on 
my chosen vocation was very slight. I should 
feel that my education had been to some pur- 
pose if my Castles in Spain were built out of 
all the noblest dreams and visions my fellow- 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



men have had, — if after hearing one of the 
great masters, I could briefly say : 

I have heard music and I cannot sleep, 

I have been in some sad and distant land 
Where silent steppes to dim horizons creep 

And long, slow rivers wind through choking sand ; 
I have heard marching, and the roll of drums 

Across those steppes within those forests dim ; 
And I have felt the sudden thrill that comes 

Upon the chanting of a mighty hymn. 
I have heard music, and I cannot sleep, 

My heart shall know nor peace nor pity yet ; 
For in me whirl, like clouds across the deep, 

Things I can neither utter nor forget. 

I should want the keys that would unlock 
the mighty kingdoms of life, — not only of hu- 
manity, but the beasts of the field, the birds of 
the air, the plants and rocks of the earth, and 
the vast universe of God. For the greatest 
human beings are surely those who have 
learned to love the great things of life for their 
own sakes. In their presence one feels "some- 
thing better than a sermon, better than medi- 
cine, better than alms — a current of energy 
and joy, and new power and incentive within 
one's self." Surely this is one noble aim of 
education, and the most beautiful of vocations 
is to be one of these. 

The final aim of education that I shall name 
does not exclude these first two, the economic 
and cultural, but comprehends and completes 
them both. And I do not know how we can 
adequately conceive that aim except by using 
that well worn, much abused, and as an advo- 
cate of the contemplative life has called it, 
"that maleficent word, service !" If our edu- 
cation so far has not disposed us willingly and 
joyously to enter a life of co-operative service 
among our fellowmen, we must conclude that 
it has so far failed. If, again, our conception 
of service has been narrowed and confined to 
one or two of the most heroic and consciously 
humanitarian of humanity's many vocations, 
like that of the minister, the missionary, and 
the social worker, we are going half blind into 
life. "What we want at present more than a 
fresh call to service," it has been briefly said, 
"is a wider conception of the field." Human- 



ity has needed to have its moral and physical 
wounds looked after and has required minis- 
trants to those needs since man appeared on 
the planet ; and will always require them, and 
will praise and reward, more or less, workers 
who supply those needs. But if humanity's 
venture on the earth is ever to issue in any- 
thing more satisfying than mere self-preserva- 
tion, humanity needs a multitude of other 
things. It needs, not least, satisfactions for a 
multitude of men and women who are not 
merely suffering bodies, clamorous with physi- 
cal wants, but are also emotional, intellectual 
and moral beings, craving a higher and larger 
life for their special human faculties. Deep 
in the heart of the world is a passion for dis- 
covering a larger and better life for all the 
people in the world, not even excluding the 
intellectual and other privileged classes, and 
every one who assists in any way at that dis- 
covery does honorable service. Furthermore, 
whoever bends his full strength to increasing 
the health and pleasurable life of men, sooner 
or later will find in his work, whatever it is, 
something of the peace and satisfaction of re- 
ligious devotion. It is only those who stretch 
out the arms of life to an infinite of this order 
towards the fulfillment of their own private 
desires and hopes. 

If there is anything in this outline of what 
we seek to be and do that is in the plan of our 
Castles in Spain these are just one or two of 
the things necessary to their realization on 
which I would say a word before I remove 
myself to that place where we, including the 
speaker, devoutly wish commencement speak- 
ers may very soon be. 

First, we must find a place to begin. That 
may seem a tremendous and all-important 
problem to some of you today. Frankly, I 
don't believe it is as important as it seems. It 
is vexing and distressing enough until it is 
settled, but it is not so important when we 
have once learned that the true vocation of any 
life is only slowly and progressively revealed, 
even after we have made the initial decision as 
to where we are to begin, whether that begin- 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



ning is a place that can be located on the map, 
or a profession which always has within itself 
infinite diversities of possible service. "A 
man," says Emerson, "is like a bit of Labrador 
Spar, which has no lustre as you turn it in 
your hand until you come to a particular an- 
gle ; then it shows deep and beautiful colors. 
There is no adaptation or universal applica- 
bility in men, but each has his special talent 
and the mastery of successful men consists in 
adroitly keeping themselves where and when 
that turn shall be oftenest to be practiced." 
The where of your final service and the when 
of your greatest service are questions that only 
the long slow movement of life can determine, 
and those who are going to make the greatest 
answers to these questions will be least anxious 
about the minor question as to where to begin. 

If, therefore, there are some amongst us, 
like the girl of whom I spoke in the beginning, 
so fascinated by "the land where I am not" 
as to be blind to the rich and various fields of 
service near at hand in the home and the home 
town, let me point you to one great soul in the 
first century who also had his Castles in Spain. 
St. Paul had a great desire to go to Rome and 
from Rome on to the unknown region of Spain. 
That was the dream of his life, its haunting 
unrealized ambition. He was always thinking 
about it ; and often talked about it ; but he 
never tried to force his way through to it. 
"Whensoever," he says to his friends in Rome, 
"I take my journey into Spain, I will come to 
you — but now I go into Jerusalem to minis- 
ter." 

The world has many disappointed and em- 
bittered people in it who have hacked their 
way through to Spain in deafness to the call of 
Jerusalem, and in defiance of the will of God 
only to find their Eldorado was a mirage. But 
the great souls keep turning their spar, keep- 
ing themselves where and when their growing 
capacities will find noblest use and they find 
Spain perhaps in Sleepy Eye, or Gopher 
Prairie, or it may be in some great citadel of 
the world spirit in one of the mighty cities of 
the earth. 



The second thing that we need is courage. 
It's a long great way we have to go to realize 
any of the greatest hopes and ambitions of 
life and we need a stout heart to keep pegging 
away till the dream comes true. You remem- 
ber what Lincoln's mother said to him as the 
end drew near, and her spirit struggled to 
break away and return to God who gave it, — 
the dying mother bade him a long loving fare- 
well, saying, "Be something, Abe." Would 
that that voice might sound in the ear of every 
one of this generation, as the greatest individ- 
ual and corporate fulfillment of its dreams. 

I want to leave with you a memory that has 
always been to me a bugle call through the 
years to be something, whether success or 
failure should be our lot at our chosen task. 
You remember the exposition that Captain 
Scott and his comrades made to discover the 
South Pole, how they struggled back growing 
ever weaker through the white wastes and 
pitched their tent for the last time. From that 
tent Scott penciled a letter to Barrie. To the 
end some of the words trail away as into the 
great silence that was waiting for them. It 
begins ; "We are pegging out in a very com- 
fortless spot, hoping this letter may be found 
and sent to you, I write you a word of fare- 
well." After some private instructions he 
goes on. "Good-bye ! I am not at all afraid 
of the end, but sad to miss many a simple 
pleasure which I had planned for the future 
in our long marches. . . . We are in a des- 
perate state, feet frozen, etc., no fuel, and a 
long way from food, but it would do your 
heart good to be in our tent to hear our songs 
and our cheery conversation." . . . "Later," — 
it is here that the words become difficult, — 
"we did intend to finish ourselves when things 
proved like this, but we have decided to die 
naturally without." 

I wish that somehow every member of this 
generation going forward into the great un- 
discovered country of the future in need of 
courage for the long great march might stand 
a moment by that tent and listen to their songs 
and have courage, the great courage that is 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



needed to fulfill the mighty hopes that are now 
in the world by being something worthy of 
our own great hour and day. 

The last qualification that I shall name is 
faith, — faith in God? Yes, faith in Him who 
never made this universe or this life for the 
coward, the fearful, the unbelieving, but for 
those who will match His glorious courage 
with a courage struck from His Own. Faith 
in the Maker of Life? Yes, faith in Him who 
knew that the greatest of all is servant of all. 
But now and here faith in life itself, faith in 
the unseen relationship between the present 
rightly used and the future of power and 
glory and service and usefulness. Do not heed 
those unreal sentimentalists who tell you that 
the years that are behind you are the happiest, 
for they are not. The happiest and most fruit- 
ful years lie before you, when the chaos and 
the restlessness are passed, if you are girding 
yourselves, tempering the iron, sharpening the 
blade, and getting ready to follow the banner 
as, held by divine hands, it takes the field. 

Members of the graduating class. Find 
your place. Be "indispensable" somewhere to 
your generation. It is your loftiest vocation 
to make some company, be it large or small, 
glad that you are alive. Move to your place, 
turning the spar to the angle of your best, and 
leave the rest to God and life. 

If the dark hours come, as they will, and 
you are hard pressed in the battle, take your 
bent sword to the Altar of the King of Chiv- 
alry and pray always through life's long day 
the old Knight's prayer, "Lord, in tomorrow's 
fight let me not falter." Go in faith and not 
without gladness, trusted by the homes that 
gave you birth, by the teachers that have 
sought to make you ready, and waited for you 
as you are waited for by a world that calls you 
to remake it before your long great day is 
done. 



THE ALUMNAE REUNION 

To the surprise and delight of the old grad- 
uates the Alumnae Association held its meeting 
in the dear old Chapel. Through the thought- 



fulness of Dr. Winslow the classroom parti- 
tions were removed and the old desk and chair 
restored to their accustomed places and there 
was altogether a dear, familiar look to things. 

At 2.00 P. M. the meeting was called to or- 
der, our Alumnae President, Evelyn Schmidt 
'14, in the chair. A piano duet by two grad- 
uates, Mayno Seltzer '22 and Helene Gras- 
horn '22, furnished a delightful opening to the 
program. Miss Schmidt in a few gracious 
words welcomed the class of 1923, and their 
president, Louise Puckett, acknowledged the 
courtesy in her usual bright way. On account 
of the recent illness and absence of our secre- 
tary, Nell Woodward '15, her report was not 
given. The treasurer, Mrs. Ella Richardson 
Cushing 73, submitted a most complete and 
encouraging report, which included the report 
from the Caroline Carpenter Endowment 
Fund, and stated how a part of the interest 
from the Alumnae funds had been used for 
the benefit of worthy present-day students. 

The Alumnae Association officers elected 
for next year were : President, Evelyn 
Schmidt '14; Vice-President, Mrs. Helen 
Lesh Zerfas '17; Secretary, Mrs. Doris 
Brown Ranlett '21 ; Treasurer, Mrs. Ella R. 
Cushing '73. 

Our Association then formally accepted Dr. 
Winslow's suggestion that fifteen members of 
the Lasell Alumnae Association be represent- 
ed on the school corporation committee. The 
form of election is to be decided upon later. 

Dr. Winslow gave a very encouraging re- 
port of the school and the recently organized 
Lasell Clubs and expressed the hope that the 
good work would continue. 

Letters written with characteristic wit and 
wisdom were read from Dr. Bragdon and 
Maude Simes Harding, '06 (now enjoying a 
summer's travel abroad). A live-wire tele- 
gram was read from Clifford Dasher Stephens 
'98, extending congratulations to the Associa- 
tion. 

Miss Packard in her own inimitable way 
presented on behalf of the L. A. A. a "pot of 
gold" to Mrs. Ella Richardson Cushing, a 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



slight token to express our appreciation of her 
untiring service as treasurer, also to mark her 
fiftieth class anniversary. 

Some interesting gifts were reported at this 
time. From the Class of 1861, $100; Class of 
1883, $60; Class of 1908, $100; a member of 
the Class of 1922, $250. 

Prof. Joseph Hills has just begun (in April) 
his fiftieth year as instructor at Lasell in the 
Department of Music. He most kindly re- 
sponded to the impromptu call from his "old 
girls," playing a fine piano selection, and ac- 
companying the members of the Association as 
they closed the program with the familiar 
strains of Auld Lang Syne. 

Mary Quick Dean '14, 

Secretary pro tern. 



DR. BRAGDON'S GREETING 

Dear Girls : 

Now I see the graduates of the last ten or 
twelve years straighten up and say, "Who is 
this who calls us 'Girls'?" But I also see the 
graduates and pupils of the previous fifty 
years smile and say, "That's all right ; he 
knows us ! We are the Girls, his girls !" 

But how can a man three thousand miles 
away, with cold pen and paper reach you when 
he competes with lively Lillie or the sober Dr. 



Guv, who can look into your eyes and tell you 
face to face that you are the nicest things in 
the whole world and that the future of the 
finest school on earth depends on you and you 
alone ? 

If I could sit at the old desk on the old plat- 
form in the old Chapel and look into your 
eager — and sometimes not so eager — faces I'd 
feel like talking to you in the same old way ! 

But the old Chapel has gone into pieces and 
the old desk has been banished to the lower 
regions ! 

I am sure I could not stand away up on that 
distant platform in the old Gymnasium and 
reach you ! It would be too far from you ! 
Anyhow, I could come down and stand on the 
floor, couldn't I ? Then, perhaps, I could 
talk ! and you'd listen because you had to. 

Now you can just shrug your shoulders and 
turn to the living voices of those who love 
you and our Lasell, not more, but more mod- 
ernly, than your old "Principal Emeritus !" 

To their voices I resign you, only adding 
that / love you same as ever, and pray the 
richest blessings upon you, each and every one. 

Dear "Girls" of 1923, the Seminary sends 
you forth to represent her ; you have today 
come into a worthy fellowship. See that you 
be worthy of it. C. C. B. 



M f 



,>v**S i"- ■■*. 



ip- ■ '& 



ft S-fci. 



. 4^4,^1 p ■ ?_ - _7 , 






'« -. ... 






^sfe A i 






... 



JUNE FETE 




IN MEMORIAM 
Since Memorial Day has just passed, it is 
fitting that we mourn in these pages the re- 
cent interment of a militant figure, long prom- 
inent in the pseudo-feud of Seniors and Jun- 
iors, Sophomores and Freshmen. The grim 
old veteran now gone to rest is known as Class 
Spirit. Over his grave let us shed a few de- 
cent tears and then rally round an abler and 
more venerable figure. For no matter how 
much prominence the deceased may receive, 
he has always been overshadowed finally by 
the towering commander of all loyal hearts — 
School Spirit. The new leader now orders in 
the far-flung battle lines, the outposts, main 
guards and reserves, and the reunited army 
will thunder past the new grave of the slum- 
bering hero in the greater cause of Lasell. 

It is all over ! The Seniors have smashed 
all records and the last echoes of the shouting 
have died away. Peace has settled once more 
on the campus — outwardly, at least. River 
Day, the great event of inter-class contests, is 
actually fading into history, leaving behind a 
varied assortment of memories and an elusive 
thing termed experience. This much we know. 
On River Day all the desperate practice of 
weeks, the energies and prayers of all the 
classes were concentrated finally on a brief 
space of time. In less than ten short minutes 
of paddling for each crew, the climax of the 
year rushed to a close. We who watched and 
entreated learned that it is the little odds and 



ends, the valuable seconds devoted to constant 
effort, which determine the annals of fate in 
a crisis. What stands out at the critical mo- 
ment merely shows what has already been 
thoroughly and carefully placed in reserve. 
There will be many crises lurking just around 
the corners of life. We shall, of course, meet 
them to the best of our ability. But our abil- 
ity is determined by our habitual, work in 
building it. So let our memory of River Day 
impress upon us to practice always what we 
would be, for we may never know when we 
must stand up to the crucial test. 

"Lasell days are nearly over" — so often 
have we Juniors wondered how it would feel 
to leave — with "no more pencils, no more 
books," — for home and a summer vacation. 
Now that the time has actually come we sing 
our song with far less enthusiasm because 
Lasell holds a very precious place in our 
hearts. New experiences and new comrade- 
ships have bound us firmly to our Alma Mater, 
loved as well by those many girls of years 
gone by, who will follow with keenest interest 
our fortunes in "carrying-on." '23 has 
given us incentive by their good sports- 
manship and loyalty. May we, the future 
Seniors, pass on to the Juniors of next year 
the invaluable heritage entrusted to us. 

"Lasell days are nearly over." How often 
we hear this repeated in song and speech ! 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



Though it always sounds the same its mean- 
ing is so very different. 

To the Seniors of '23 it means parting from 
the dear school where so many happy hours 
have been spent, to take up the various occu- 
pations awaiting them. Many will return to 
the school in the years to come, to find that 
great changes have taken place in their ab- 
sence. 

To the Juniors it means going home for the 
summer vacation with all its pleasures, to re- 
turn the following September to carry on, as 
best they may, the work of the Seniors, and 
all too soon to move about in cap and gown. 

To underclassmen it means a year nearer to 
the day when they, too, will be graduated from 
their Alma Mater. 

But let us hope that in the heart of every 
one the spark of loyalty has been kindled to 
burn forever. For whosoever gives loyalty 
inspires loyalty, and receives it in return. 
What a wonderful feeling it is to know that 
there is one spot on this earth where people 
love you and are interested in your welfare 
and happiness ! How could you help then but 
return to Lasell, realizing with pride and af- 
fection that you, too, belong to, and are an im- 
portant part of, this great and growing organ- 



ization? Just as every cog is essential and 
vital to its wheel, so are your love and co- 
operation imperative to Lasell. 

"Home, sweet home," these words mean so 
much to us, especially now, since the time has 
come when we must leave our Alma Mater and 
go home to enjoy happy vacation days with 
our families. 

How quickly this year has passed, but time 
always passes quickly when we are busy. We 
have been busy ; every minute has been filled 
to the utmost, and yet, have we worked hard 
enough and accomplished all that we wished to 
achieve this year? Are we ready to go home 
to our parents, who have made possible for us 
all these advantages, who have labored and 
sacrificed that we may gain this broader ex- 
perience ? We came here to get the best that 
Lasell has to offer, but it is not given us until 
we give our best. 

During the past year at Lasell our Seniors 
have accomplished many worth-while things 
and through their experiences we have learned 
how to give the best. In the year to come, we, 
as Seniors, will try to live up to their high 
ideals, their Lasell standards. 




SENIORS CHEER AS '23 WINS 




May 21. At nine o'clock, two big trucks 
drew up in front of Bragdon and were 
soon filled with a crowd of girls joyously em- 
barking, lunch-boxes and all, for the long- 
anticipated trip to Plymouth. They stopped 
at Nantasket Beach for lunch and arrived at 
Plymouth early in the afternoon, where they 
saw practically everything of interest includ- 
the Old Oaken Bucket, Plymouth Rock, the 
Old Cemetery, the John Alden House, Miles 
Standish Statue, Pilgrim Hall and the birth- 
place of John Adams. 

May 28. Another group of students en- 
joyed a trip to Salem, Marblehead and Glou- 
cester. 

May 25. The Christian Endeavor of May 
25 was led by Ruth Hight, who spoke to us 
impressively concerning the friendships made 
at school. June 1 the meeting was led by Ce- 
cile Loomis, last year's president, who spoke 
of her impressions on returning to Lasell. 
Genevieve Tiernan delighted us with a solo. 

Dr. Leavitt spoke to us at Vespers, May 27, 
and gave us a new way of looking at tempta- 
tions and an incentive to resist them. 

June 3. The Vesper Service of June 3 was 
held in the Methodist Church. The Senior and 
Intermediate Choirs of that church, led by the 
pastor, Mr. Harper, presented the "Holy 
City." 



At the last meeting of the Athletic Associa- 
tion Frances Badger was elected to succeed 
Betty Mitchell as president for next year. 

The prize of five dollars, offered to the stu- 
dent who should submit the best advertise- 
ment for Lasell in an open competition, was 
won by Betty Mitchell, who seems to do every- 
thing extremely well. 

At the final meeting of the Dramatic Club 
the following officers were elected for next 
year : President, Matilda Daugherty ; Vice- 
President, Elsie Terhune ; Secretary, Barbara 
Pinkham ; Advertising Manager, Gertrude 
Wragg. 

On Friday of Senior Week, the Junior 
Class once more serenaded Gardner and Car- 
penter, as they had done in the dim and dis- 
tant month of September, but on this occa- 
sion a farewell note of sadness rang through 
it. 

May 26 — Glee Club night ! Guests at din- 
ner and later at the Concert in the tent. All 
were most enthusiastic over the excellent ren- 
dering of selections by the Glee and Mando- 
lin Clubs. Congratulations to you, Mr. Har- 
per, for your faithful and efficient director- 
ship, and to you, Josephine and Doris, as 
leaders ! 

Following is the program : 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



Glee Club Leader 

Josephine Curry, "23 

Mandolin Club Leader 

Doris K. Lougee, '24 

Accompanists 

Helen C. Schroer, '24 

Marguerite Robinson, '24 

Director 

Mr. Earl E. Harper 

PROGRAM 
Gypsy Fire Brahms 

Gleam, Gleam de Faye 

Glee Club 
The Crackerjack Odell 

Shifting Shadows Odell 

Mandolin Club 
Swing Along Cook 

Darkey Lullaby . Dvorak 

In May Parker 

Glee Club 
Barcarolle (from "Tales of Hoffman") Offenbach 
Indian Smoke Dance Metz 

Mandolin Club 
Eastern Song Daniels 

Sparkling Sunlight Ardite 

Glee Club 

Wednesday, June 6, occurred the Pupils' 
Commencement Concert. An enthusiastic 
audience thoroughly appreciated the splendid 
work accomplished by the more advanced pu- 
pils in voice, piano and organ. Following is 
the program : — 
Piano — Whims Schumann 

Miss Chandler 
Voice — Thou Art My Repose Schubert 

Miss Fontaine 
Pianoforte and Organ — Theme and Variations 

Dunham 
Miss Lightbody and Miss Davis 
Voice — My Heart at Thy Dear Voice Saint-Saens 

Miss Huggins 
Piano — Humoreske Rachmaninoff 

Miss Gilman 

Voice — The Little Trees Osgood 

(In Old Athlone) 

Miss Hight 

Piano — Arabesque MacDowell 

Miss Anderson 

Voice — The Gathered Rose Franck 

Florian's Song Godard 

Miss Hessin 

Violin — Canto Amoroso Sammartini-Elman 

Miss Doris Lougee 
Voice — I Know a Hill Whelpley 

The Nightingale Has a Lyre of Gold 

Whelpley 
Miss Lunny 



Piano — Polichinelle Rachmaninoff 

Miss Schroer 
Voice — The Almond Blossom Schumann 

The Lotus Flower Schumann 

Miss Cole 
Pianoforte Ensemble — Ballet (from Petit Suite) 

Debussy 
Misses Lightbody, Davis, Schroer and Cummings 

The Senior Reception was held Saturday 
evening, June 9, at Woodland. The parents 
and friends of the graduating class were re- 
ceived by Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Miss Potter, 
Mr. and Mrs. Towne and Miss Louise 
Puckett. 

June 9 in Carter Hall was held the Sewing 
and Cooking Exhibit, which reflected great 
credit upon the teaching staff and the girls of 
that department. Artistic and practical gowns, 
hats, and exquisite needlework gave evidence 
of creative ability and many hours of con- 
scientious work. Every kind of dish was 
daintily displayed from clam cocktail to froz- 
en dainties, dishes fit for the epicures, and 
others for the invalid. In the living room 
guests were served with frappe and fancy 
crackers. 

Class Night was clear and favorable. May 
it be an omen of Twenty-three's future ! The 
impressive and enjoyable ceremonies of the 
evening radiated talent, mirth and the sor- 
row of parting. The tent was filled to over- 
flowing with interested friends who listened 
to a program printed elsewhere in this number. 

June 2 — A glorious day for the June Fete ! 
The classes assembled on Bancroft Lawn and 
formed in double lines facing one another ; 
Seniors in cap and gown with corsage of roses 
and lilies of the valley ; Juniors in white, car- 
rying white balloons bearing their class nu- 
merals in black ; Sophomores in white, carry- 
ing red and grey balloons, and Freshmen and 
Specials in white, carrying green balloons. 

Through the centre came wee ladies-in- 
waiting and the page, — Jane Brown of Orange, 
N. J., Priscilla Winslow, and Earl Cummings, 
— preceding the Queen, Elizabeth Neal, es- 
corted by Louise Puckett, the President, and 
the Maid of Honor, Bonnie Orlady, escorted 
by Anna Bullock, the vice-president. 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 




MAY QUEEN 

After the procession, crowning, and sing- 
ing of class songs, the following dances were 
given and greatly appreciated for their unique 
conceptions and artistic rendering : 
Procession of the School 
Crowning of the May Queen 
Class Songs 
Dances 

Winding of the May Pole 

By Woodland Park Pupils 

Irish Dance 

Valentine Pantomime 

Sailor's Hornpipe 

Butterfly Dance 

Barn Dance 

King Tut Dance 

Tableau of Dancers 



I. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 



not be too generous in our praise of the staff 
who have worked so brilliantly and painstak- 
ingly on this first year book to be published 
since 1914. The "Lamp," however, needs no 
glory but its own merit. We extend best 
wishes to the new staff for next year, and feel 
confident that they will carry on with credit 
the work entrusted to them. 



THE LAMP STAFF 
Editor-in-Chief 

Louisa Venable 

Assistan t Editor-in-Chief 

Josephine Curry 

Associate Editors 

Helen Chapman Anna Bullock 

Mira Huggins Dorothy Chase 

Louise Puckett Ruth Hight 

Art Editor 

Margaret Bullock 

Business Manager 

Elizabeth Mitchell 

Assistant Business Manager 

Carolyn Colton 

Advertising Editors 

Rosalie Gruhn 

Norma Prentis 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Shortly after returning from our Easter va- 
cation the final basket-ball game between Sen- 
iors and Juniors was played. This was one of 
the fastest games throughout the season, end- 
ing in favor of the Seniors. 

For the past several weeks tennis has been 
in full swing. On Thursday, May 17, a tour- 
nament was held between Newton and Lasell. 
Manv of our girls came out to watch the play- 
ers and were well repaid. Although we lost 
two of the sets, the single set played by Ruth 
Hight and Miss Eaton was a Lasell victory. 



THE LAMP 

One of the many achievements of this 
year's Senior Class is the Year Book. We can- 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

May 18. Woodland Park was greatly in- 
terested in Lasell Field Day sports at Gardner 
Hall. We shall send on to Lasell next year 
some fine athletes. 

May 19. Our friend, the "Grey Line," ap- 
peared early to take most of our girls, chap- 
eroned by Mrs. Lambert, to Marblehead and 
Salem. A perfect day, a happy crowd, and a 
splendid lecturer. Our history and literature 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



classes are made vivid by these jolly trips. 

May 19-20. Mary and Virginia Cowles 
spent the week-end with us. They say they 
are homesick for Woodland Park. 

May 22. The fourth, fifth, and sixth 
grades had a day at Franklin Park. Mrs. Mc- 
Donald and Mrs. Lambert took charge of the 
party. The men in charge of the birds and 
animals were most courteous and helped in 
making the day beneficial and interesting. 

May 22. This year's ninth grade is the first 
class at Woodland Park to organize. After 
the first regular class meeting on the evening 
of May 22 the class serenaded the Juniors, 
singing several new songs written for the oc- 
casion. After the serenade Mrs. McDonald 
served a welcome luncheon to the ninth grade. 

May 23. Mrs. Himelhoch of Detroit spent 
the day visiting her daughter, Marjean. 

May 26. Miss Hemmeon accompanied a 
small group to Plymouth. In the evening the 
school attended the Lasell Glee Club Concert. 

May 30. Rev. Earl Harper was our guest 
at morning chapel. After the usual devotional 
exercises, Maxine Lawrence and Preble Bor- 
den spoke briefly and effectively of the signifi- 
cance of Memorial Day. Mr. Harper brought 
to our minds two significant stories from the 
life of Abraham Lincoln. The flag salute was 
led by Earl Cummings. In the afternoon the 
annual swimming contest was held in Lasell's 
swimming pool. Nearly all of the Junior 
School girls can swim and the contest was very 
close, each side working hard for the greater 
number of points. The Whites finally won 
over the Greens by y 2 point. Eleanor Zim- 
mer and Gwendolyn McDonald tied each oth- 
er for the greatest number of individual points. 

We think that the spirit of co-operation be- 
tween the students and teachers at Woodland 
Park is quite remarkable. It has become the 
custom of the Senior Class to have a "spread." 
To this spread the evening of May 30, Mrs. 
McDonald was invited and joined heartily in 
the girls' fun. It was a jolly party, though 
perforce rather quietly so ! 

May 31. We were delighted with a call 



from Mrs. Concha Aguirre Turnbull and Se- 
norita Maria Orozco. 

After one period of afternoon study, the 
whole school joined Lasell at River Day 
sports. Accompanied by their teachers the 
different groups had picnic suppers at Norum- 
bega Park. When it came to merry-go-rounds, 
pony rides, ice cream cones and ginger ale, 
there is no difference noticeable in the grades 
of our school. 

June 1. We are again indebted to Mr. and 
Mrs. Theodore Borst for a delightful picnic 
at Little Tree Farm, No. 2. Elizabeth Borst 
was our young hostess. A pleasant drive to 
the farm, walks among the trees and flowers, 
a delicious supper, dancing in the big halls, 
and the drive home again by moonlight ! A 
perfect party ! 

June 2. Woodland Park Field Day. The 
basket-ball game was won by the Greens. The 
Field Day individual honors were won by Nat- 
alie Best, Marjorie Winslow and Eleanor 
Zimmer. 

Woodland Park's part in Lasell's June Fete 
is always the dancing of the May-pole. Led 
by Dorris Elliot and Marjean Himelhoch, six- 
teen girls danced across the green and took up 
the green and white ribbons, Woodland Park 
colors. We are indebted to Miss Dudley for 
training the girls for this dance. 

June 2. The ninth grade entertained the 
eighth grade — their farewell party. Each 
member of the Senior class made some sug- 
gestions to their Juniors for the coming year. 
The text of the speeches may be summed up 
in the words of one of the girls — "Co- 
operate with the teachers ! You have a better 
time and less trouble, and it pays ! We have 
found that out !" Ice cream and cake were 
served, followed by a half hour of dancing. 

June 3. The school attended the evening 
service at the Methodist Episcopal Church and 
enjoyed the rendering of an oratorio, "The 
Holy City." 

June 5. The fifth and sixth grades spent the 
day in the Children's Museum in Jamaica 
Plain. 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



June 6. Woodland Park's first Class Day ! 
The exercises were held on the sunporch at 
8.50 A. M. After the usual chapel exercises, 
Mrs. McDonald called upon Vera Hambleton, 
the class president, to take charge of the pro- 
gram. Vera announced that Julia Larrabee 
had been appointed secretary-treasurer, and 
Eleanor Parker, class artist. The class 
prophecy was read by Vera Hambleton. The 
Alphabetical fortunes given by Elizabeth 
Rhoades. Genevieve Stickney gave a very 
witty resume of the members of the Junior 
class. The President then presented to Mrs. 
McDonald for the living-room a very hand- 
some '23 Banner, designed by Eleanor Parker. 

After the class song the Juniors sang to the 
Seniors and a successful Class Day closed 
with an appreciative address by Mr. Towne. 
Mrs. Winslow, Mrs. Towne and Mrs. Bul- 
lock were our guests. 

June 6. At the close of the Class Day ex- 
ercises Mrs. McDonald called upon Miss Case 
to announce the winner of the school cup and 
decorate the winners of the different athletic 
events of the year. The 



following awards 



were given : 

The Cup, to the 
Captain. 

W. P. In Baseball 
Preble Borden 
Elizabeth Borst 
Dorothy Smith 
Julia Larrabee 



Greens, Eleanor Parker, 




W. 



W. 



W. 



Maria Baxter 
Maxine Lawrence 
Mona Towle 
Genevieve Stickney 
Marguerite Gillespie 
P. In Basket-ball 

Victoria Jackson Gertrude Curtis 
Vera Hambleton Katherine Braithwaite 
Marjorie Winslow Eleanor Parker 

P. Field Day Records 

Natalie Best 

Marjorie Winslow 

P. Running Broad Jump 

Eleanor Zimmer 

P. Swimming 
Gwendolyn McDonald 
Eleanor Zimmer 



Rosettes. Tennis 

Elizabeth Borst, Fall tournament 

Marjorie Winslow, Spring tournament 
Rosettes. Jacks 

Gwendolyn McDonald 
Rosettes. Hopscotch 

Eleanor Zimmer 
June 7. At 10 A. M. the school assembled 
on the hill south of Junior House for its first 
tree planting ceremony. After a short speech 
by Vera Hambleton, class president, each 
member of the ninth grade did her part to- 
ward the tree planting. The spade was then 
passed on to Marguerite Gillespie, who made 
the highest average for the year's work in the 
eighth grade. 



Johann Sebastian Bach 



AN HOUR OF MUSIC 

Invitation to the Dance (for two pianos) Weber 

Priscilla Winslow, Miss Davis 
A Very Queer Story Mathilde Bilbro 

Mary French 
Singing and Swinging Mrs. Crosby Adams 

Earl Cummings 
Butterfly Chase Charles Denee 

Dorris Elliot 
Solfeggietto Philipp Emanuel Bach 

Norma Lambert 
Intrata > 
Gavotte ) 

Mona Towle 
Voices of the Woods Rubenstein 

Woodland Park Chorus 
Daffodils Robert Carvel 

Marguerite Gillespie 
To the Spring Grieg 

Helen Parker 
Dance of the Elves Grieg 

Julia Larrabee 
Remembrance Telma 

Marjorie Winslow 
Prelude in E Minor Mendelssohn 

Katherine Braithwaite 
Waltz Chopin 

Morning Mood Grieg 

Dance Italienne Hills 

Gwendolyn McDonald 
Lieberstraume (No. 3) Liszt 

Victoria Jackson 

Out in the Sunshine Ciro Pinsuti 

Woodland Park Chorus 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



YOUR SCHOOL AND OURS 

"To teach that the greatest liberty is the binding 

of one's self" 
This Modern Age 

"Is there anything in the world of which we may 
say, 'This thing is new'?" 

Julia Larrabee, Helen Parker 
Humoreske (for violin) Anton Dvorak 

Cradle Song (for violin) M. Hauser 

Dorothy Smith 
The Citizen 

"Our country asks us so to live . . ." 

Elizabeth Rhoades, Genevieve Stickney 
Because Some Men in Khaki Coats 

G. R. Glasgow 
Anna Moffatt Benson 
Civic Pledge 

Preble Borden 
Song — America My Home Alfred Wooler 

Woodland Park Chorus 
The School 
"What we teach has higher ends than merely be- 
ing taught and learned." 

Victoria Jackson, Eleanor Parker 
Dance — Springtime 

Group 
The Home 

"Home is where the child is." 

Elizabeth Borst 
Song — Slumber Boat Jessie L. Gaynor 

Mona Towle 
The Battle of Wood-pile Hill 
Mary Elizabeth Keever, Priscilla Winslow, 
Earl Cummings 
Grandmother Roy Gilson 

"The last of life, the best, for which the first is 
made." 

Vera Hambleton 
June Song Rudolf King 

Woodland Park Chorus 



PLEDGES FOR LASELL ENDOWMENT 

Class of '57 Fund 

Frances Sykes Davis 
Class of '61 Fund 

Caroline Hills Leeds 
Class of '93 Fund 

Jessie Gaskill Wheelock 
Class of '94 Fund 

Harriet G. Scott 

Jennie M. Rich 
Class of '96 Fund 

Josephine Chandler Pierce 
Class of '97 Fund 

Edith Howe Kip 



Class of '98 Fund 

Emma Aull Duncan 

Clara Davis Lounsbury 

Jane Myrick Gibbs 

Caroline Kendall Putnam 
Class of '99 Fund " 

Evelyn Ebert Allen 

Ethlyn Prentice Knight 

Alice Jenckes Wilson 

Elise Scott Mackintosh 
Class of '02 Fund 

Edith McClure Patterson 

Clara McLean Rowley 

Cornelia Douglass Houser 
Class of '03 Fund 

Mary Goodwin Olmstead 

Bertha Hayden King- 
Class of '05 Fund 

Ira R. Jones 
Class of '06 Fund 

Helen Carter Marcy 
Class of '07 Fund 

Clara Nims 
Class of '08 Fund 

Lizzie W. Morrell 
Class of '09 Fund 

Louise Funkhouser Colegrove 
Class of '11 Fund 

Louise Mayer Scheim 

Mary A. Ordway 

Gladys Lawton 
Class of '12 Fund 

Florence Jones 

Esther Morey Hain 

Annie Merrill David 
Class of '14 Fund 

Mildred Hotchkiss Girvin 
Class of '15 Fund 

Susan E. Tiffany 
Class of '16 Fund 

Helen Merrill Strohecker 

Maude Hayden 
Class of '17 Fund 

Jessie Shepherd 
Class of '18 Fund 

Ruth Newcomb 

Cornelia Gaty 

Helene Davenport Bowman 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



Dorothy C. Barnes 

Lydia Adams 

Barbara McLellan 
Class of '19 Fund 

Mercie Nichols 

Ethel Ramage Fisk 

Carolyn Kuhn Ferrer 

Deborah Ingraham 
Class of '20 Fund 

Muriel James Morrison 
Class of '21 Fund 

Marion Bodwell Lesher 

Helen L. Beede 

Leonora Conklin 
Class of '22 Fund 

Lucile Pfeifer 

Leilya K. Barkman 

Iverna Birdsall 

Mabel E. Rawlings 

Cornelia Hemingway 
Class of '23 Fund 

Elizabeth Buettner 

Helen Buettner 

Florence Boehmcke 

Dorothy Chase 

Carolyn. S. Colton 

Josephine Curry 

Lucy Fuller 

Florence Gifford 

Ruth Hopkins 

Ruth Hills 

Helen Hinshaw 

Ida Markert 

Jeannette Merrick 

Elizabeth Mitchell 

Claire Parker 

Louise Puckett 

H. Mercedes Rendell 

Evelyn Shidler 

Adrienne E. Smith 

Winnifrede Stackpole 

Mary Eugenia Swift 

Ruth S. Throm 

Jessie Watters 

Doris Wilde 
General Endowment Fund 

Mabel Hamlin Barby 

Ethel B. Hook 

Gertrude Gleason Shepard 

Julia Funkhouser Mellin 



Susan Hallock Couch 
Chicago Club Fund 

Bertha Hax Auld 
Guy M. Winslow Fund 

Mrs. G. M. Winslow 

Dr. G. M. Winslow 



ENDOWMENT AND SCHOLARSHIP 


FUNDS 




Bancroft 


$5,000.00 


Blaisdell 


8,800.00 


Clark 


1,000.00 


Class of 1857 


5.00 


1861 


100.00 


1863 


200.00 


1883 


60.00 


1893 


5.00 


1894 


115.50 


1897 


85.00 


1898 


15.00 


1899 


20.00 


1902 


5.00 


1903 


10.00 


1905 


5.00 


1906 


5.00 


1907 


5.00 


1908 


205.00 


1909 


10.00 


1910 


50.00 


1911 


40.00 


1912 


65.00 


1914 


10.00 


1915 


5.00 


1916 


10.00 


1917 


5.00 


1918 


50.00 


1919 


15.00 


1920 


5.00 


1921 


343.00 


1922 


2,270.00 


1923 


2,065.00 


Student's Aid General 


25.00 


Student's Aid Lasell 


50.00 


B. C. Martin 


25.00 


G. M. Winslow 


4,120.00 


Chicago Club 


5.00 


N. Y. Lasell Club 


3.50 


Omaha Club 


100.00 



$24,912.00 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



In addition there are two funds in the hands 
of the Alumnae Association, from the income 
of which students receive aid. These are the 
Caroline Carpenter Fund of about $1,800, 
managed by Mrs. Merriam, and $3,500 in Mrs. 
Cushing's hands which has been accumulated 
from annual dues and life memberships paid 
by members of the Association. 



LIFE MEMBERS 

OF 

LASELL ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

1916 Harriett Grace Scott '94 
Lela Helen Goodall '08 

1917 Laura Case Viot '94 

1918 Alice Andreeson Kountz '95 ' 
Blanche Gardner Peeler '00 

1919 Ida Sibley Webber '84 
Gladys Margaret Lawton '11 
Annie Wallace '83 
Mildred Vaughan Goodall '10 
Jessie Caulk Shepherd '17 
Ruth Ellen Griffin '16 

1920 Alice Rosamond Kendall '99 
Edna Rogers Carlisle '05 
Frances O. Davis '57 
Caroline Hills Leeds '61 
Lillian Mansfield Packard '83 



Rose Haywood Brown '54 
Mildred Westervelt Warner '13 
Carrie Wallace Hussey '82 
Ida Capron Cook '63 
Katherine Ames Ide '69 
Fannie Martha Gates '17 
Doris Margaret Crawford '20 

1921 Annie Jean Hackett '96 
Anna Enona Crane '20 
Dorothy Canfield Cheseldine '14 
Julia Ellen Crafts TO 
Margaret May Jones '11 
Gladys Victoria Lucas '21 

1922 Susan Emeline Tiffany '15 
Cornelia M. Hemingway '22 
Julia Russell Robertson '21 
Ruth Davis Giller '14 
Florence Kathryn Jones '12 
Marjorie Vivian Hussey '20 
Ida Ruth Jones '05 

Isabel Maud Fish '20 
Jennie May Rich '94 

1923 Adrienne Estelle Smith '23 

This year the Class of 1923 has followed 
the fine example set by the Class of 1922 in 
joining the Alumnae Association en bloc. This 
is as it should be, and it is particularly pleas- 
ing to have one member of the class become 
at graduation a life member of the Association. 




RIVER DAY 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 




line of teaching our students to intelligently 
manage their own business affairs, a point 
which he has strongly emphasized in his teach- 



ing. 



An added item of interest is the fact that 
Mrs. Amesbury was formerly Jennie Ford, 
who was a student at Lasell in 1903-1904. Mr. 
and Mrs. Amesbury with their four children 
will occupy Berkeley House. 

Guy M. Winslow. 




MR. WALTER R. AMESBURY 



We are very glad to announce that Mr. 
Walter R. Amesbury, who was for nine years 
in charge of the work of our Secretarial De- 
partment and who has been teaching with the 
Bryant & Stratton School in Boston for the 
past fifteen years, is coming to the Seminary 
as one of the executive officers and as Director 
of the Secretarial Department. 

Mr. Amesbury is a graduate of Boston 
University with the degree of B.B.A., is a 
Public Accountant, and has pursued the study 
of law at Boston University. 

Those who have known the efficient work 
which Mr. Amesbury has done as a teacher 
and as an accountant will appreciate the satis- 
faction which we have in his coming to us. 
Under his direction it is our expectation that 
the work of our Secretarial Department will 
be expanded and improved, especially in the 



Some rare days this June were chosen by 
Lasell girls for their wedding days. 

On the fourteenth of June Maxine Perry '22 
became the bride of Mr. Roger Truman Hall. 

The wedding of Marjorie Gifford '22 and 
Mr. George Washington Grimm, Jr., took 
place on the twenty-third of June at the Lake 
Hopatcong Yacht Club, Lake Hopatcong, 
New Jersey. 

Margaret Barnett Reid '22 and Mr. Nelson 
Revitt Perry were married on the second of 
June. 

The wedding of Helen Kirkpatrick '20 and 
Mr. John William Welch took place on the 
twenty-seventh of June. Mr. and Mrs. Welch 
will be at home at 315 N. Jackson St., Atlanta, 
Georgia, after the first of August. 

Isabel Britton became the bride of Mr. 
Harry Powell Sharpies on the fourteenth of 
June. 

Miss Winnifrede Stackpole has served suc- 
cessfully in the Department of Expression, 
and we regret her withdrawal from the 
faculty. We have recently received the an- 
nouncement of her engagement to Mr. Harold 
Frederick Meyer. 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



The engagement of Ruth Asenath Smith '21 
to Mr. Ralph Porter Coates is announced. 

The engagement announcement of Iverna L. 
Birdsall '22 to Mr. James Frederick Biggin 
is received. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Lucille Eichengreen '22 to Mr. Joseph Leopold 
Block is received. 

Among the peppiest personalities present 
during this Commencement tide was undoubt- 
edly the Class of 1908. Their class songs, 
catching and fetching class cheer, their unique 
class costume and sincere and lively interest 
in every forward movement of the school de- 
lighted Lasell of today. Their last gracious 
act was the presentation of a check of $100 to 
the Endowment Fund in loving memory of 
their classmate, Madeline E. B. Lovitt. We 
understand that through the gracious courtesy 
of Lela Goodall the members of 1908 are now 
enjoying a house party at Lela's home in San- 
ford, Maine. Interested friends will find the 
names of these loyal old girls in the Com- 
mencement roster. 

The Personals Editor feels honored to place 
at the head of the list of distinguished old 
girls who made glad our Commencement time 
the names of Mrs. Mary Shaw Rogers '56, 
Mrs. Fannie Sykes Davis '57, and Mrs. Caro- 
line Hill Leeds '61. Their keen interest in the 
events of the Commencement program made 
it difficult for us to realize that many years 
have slipped away since they were in residence 
at our school home. 

Mrs. Ella Richardson Cushing '73 and Mrs. 
Emma George Newhall '73 celebrated this 
year their fiftieth anniversary and in a sense 
were the guests of honor. They were kind 
enough to give us a little more of their time 
than just Commencement Day, so that we felt 
in a dear sense they again belonged to us. 

Alfhild Trondsen is fast regaining her 
health, but was unable to join us at Com- 
mencement time. However, we all appreci- 
ated her message of good-will and congratu- 
lations. 

Clara Nims '07 is again planning to take a 



summer course at Simmons College along the 
line of library work. We were sorry she 
could not reach Boston in time for our reunion. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kingman Packard Cass 
(Mary Frances Fiske) are receiving congratu- 
lations upon the birth of a son, Donald Chand- 
ler Cass. Master Donald has a warm welcome 
at Lasell, for his mother, his two grand- 
mothers, Fanny Thomas Fiske (1887-8) and 
Mary Packard Cass '89, and two of his great- 
aunts, Nellie Packard Draper '84 and Lillian 
Packard '83, are all Lasell girls. He is 
blessed, also, with two great-grandmothers. 

Katherine Katz, accompanied by a ministe- 
rial friend (we may have something later to 
say about this), visited Lasell recently and 
gave a good report of her interesting work as 
Instructor in English since her graduation 
from college. We were glad to welcome these 
old and new friends. 

Clara Huttenbauer Levy '07 visited Lasell 
recently. We could not see that the years 
had added a day as far as looks are con- 
cerned with this old girl and yet she assured 
us she is the mother of two dear children. 

Dorothy Stewart Allen '17 in acknowledg- 
ing the Baby Book sent by Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low writes : "Baby Stewart is a big boy for 
his age — a constant comfort, and is worshipped 
by his sister, Jean, who, if we are not watch- 
ful, is in danger of loving him too much. 
Dorothy meets frequently Clara Spinney Colby 
'18 and Harriet Morris '18 and hears from 
Elizabeth Stiles Tilton." 

The announcement of Eloise Carey's '20 
engagement to Mr. Angus D. Douglas will 
be of especial interest to some of the older 
girls when they learn that Mr. Douglas is a 
cousin of our dear Lilian Douglas '07. 

New Lasell Clubs seem to be springing up 
everywhere and all the time. How glad we 
were when the good news came that on May 
19, twelve Lasell girls met at the home of 
Winifred Smith Chambers and decided to form 
a New Haven Lasell Club. The first regular 
meeting will be held in October. Dear girls, 
your Alma Mater wishes you Godspeed. We 



LASELL LEAVES 



37 



understand that Leota Fulton and Winifred 

Smith Chambers are the prime promoters of 

the Club, and thanks to the thought fulness of 

Leota, we give below the names of those 

present : 

Madeleine Loomis Caldwell, 1916-19 

Leontine Goodman Thalheimer '18 

Juliette Beach Barker '13 

Elsie A. Flight '18 

Winifred Smith Chambers, 1905-06 

Winifred Anthony Glick, 1912-13 

Cornelia Hemingway '22 

Eva L. Chandler, 1900-01 

Carolyn Hoitt McAllister 

Frances Wood Willis, 1897-98 

Josephine Holbrook '22 (Norwich, Conn.) 

Leota M. Fulton, 1919-20 

Such fine news comes to us from our dear 
Nell Woodward '15. She is still in Denver, 
Colorado, enjoying the home life, but in a re- 
cent letter to Lasell folk she tells us the glad 
news that she hopes to be in New England 
some time this summer, and the beautiful plans 
in which we have all been interested will 
materialize. 

In a recent letter from Florence Archibald 
'22 she writes from Florida that she has had a 
busy winter. While giving some time to social 
life she has found time to do some worth- 
while work among the needy people of her 
community. She adds : "Several of us have 
gone in for charity work. We have a needy 
family to care for. The father is in jail, the 
big brother in a reform school, and the mother 
works for $1.25 a day from 6 in the morning 
to 6 at night. There are three little girls. The 
whole family are in great need. I hope we 
can do them some good." Blessings on you, 
Florence, there is no doubt about the outcome 
of such splendid effort. We hope we may be 
excused, but we cannot refrain from putting 
in her greeting to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
just as the dear girl wrote it. "Please give 
my love to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow (I do think 
they are just lovely). I hope Commencement 
will be the biggest success ever." 

We are indebted to Mrs. Barris for this 



interesting item concerning Dorothea Strain. 
She writes, "Dorothea dropped in for a short 
while Sunday evening to tell us good-bye. She 
sails June 4 for a summer abroad, spending 
most of her time in Spain, Germany, and 
England. She was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of California in September, 1922, and 
has been doing post graduate work at Rad- 
cliffe this past winter. We have also heard 
that she is to do some work at Oxford before 
returning. Our best wishes follow this pro- 
gressive old girl. 

In returning to Lasell this Commencement 
tide Jessie Shepherd '17 and Norma MacMil- 
lan revived vivid recollections of Lasell six 
years ago. 

A very thrilling newspaper report recently 
told of the saving from drowning of two girls 
in Vineyard Haven Harbor. A fire was dis- 
covered on the yacht in which the girls were 
sailing and they jumped into a skiff which 
was quickly capsized in the rough sea. They 
again returned to the burning boat, but for- 
tunately were rescued by skippers who noticed 
their dilemma. One of these rescued girls was 
our Mildred Manter, at Lasell in 1916-17. 

Word has come to us recently of the death 
of Mabel Frederick Buckley (1903-04) of 
Hazelton, Pa., but no particulars other than 
(he brief sad notice. 

We have just learned with sorrow of the 
recent passing away of Helen Martin. It was 
but yesterday that this dear girl was in our 
midst — well and happy. 

Lasell girls of 1889 will learn with sadness 
of the passing away of the mother of our dear 
Grace Huntington, which occurred the latter 
part of May. Some of us who knew this 
former schoolmate more intimately recall the 
many years of tender care which she and her 
brother have extended to this aged mother, 
and can understand how lonely life will ever 
seem to them without the presence of this dear 
parent. 

Our tenderest sympathy is extended to 
these friends and their relatives in this hour of 
their bereavement. 



* 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 



Esther McMaster has kept in friendly touch 
with us during her Wellesley days. We now 
have the pleasure of extending to her our 
hearty congratulations on her recent gradua- 
tion from this neighboring college. 

Three little children have come into the 
homes of Lasell mothers during these later 
days. We welcome them and extend loving 
greetings to parents and children alike. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Oliver L. Bardes (Alice 
Pape '21) a son, James Edward Bardes. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Clay Kuykendall (Ethel 
Murray '15 ) a daughter, Ethel Laura 
Kuykendall. 

To Mr. and Mrs. R. E. McCorkindale 
(Ruby Newcomb '14 ) a daughter, Barbara 
McCorkindale. 

Our efficient and progressive Alumnae presi- 
dent, Evelyn Schmidt '14, is off for Labrador! 
She sailed June the sixteenth. She will spend 
three months of this summer in giving her 
services along the lines of dental hygiene to 
the workers of that fascinating mission field. 
Our best wishes go with her. 

Never before can we recall such a whole- 
sale return to the school as that made by 
the class of 1922. Their fine spirit was 
especially in evidence on Commencement 
Day in the dining room where their spir- 
ited class songs were heartily appreciated 
by all who were privileged to hear them. 

That song from the dining room balcony 
by the class of 1921 was dear beyond the 
wording. It takes only a few loyal singers 
to make a "hit." "Certainly they did 
themselves proud !" 

Marie Riker Hume '09 was unable to 
arrive on time, but we were delighted to 
receive her and Mary Quick Dean '14 dur- 
ing the early days of vacation. 

Miss Rose and Dr. Sophie Morgenthaler 
were also among the early vacation guests 
at the Seminary. They were in splendid 
health and spirits and brought a fine re- 
port of Etta MacMillan Rowe and a most 
fascinating picture of her home, "Sunny 
Pines," at Daytona Beach, Florida. 



One of the big regrets of the Personal 
Editor was that she could not enjoy a visit 
with the individual girls at Commence- 
ment time, but she did have one sitting 
with dear Sophie Mayer '08. She certainly 
has gone from "strength to strength," and 
gave an interesting report of her work as 
head of the Department of Domestic Sci- 
ence in the schools of Hamilton, Ohio. 

Ruth Ordway '21 has just completed her 
course at The New School of Design. She 
has easily won the highest honors and we 
wish many of her friends could enjoy the 
unusually fine exhibition of Ruth's art 
work. 

Eva Robertson dropped in one day, much 
to our joy, but was unable to remain for 
Commencement. She and her mother were 
making a tour through New England in 
Eva's fine new car. We are always delighted 
to meet and greet this old girl. 

We were happy to receive a letter re- 
cently from dear Helen Landon's mother 
which contained an encouraging report of 
Helen's convalescence. Although the work 
is slow we are led to believe she will later 
be "well and happy." Lasell certainly 
looks forward to the glad day when Helen 
will be again one of our Lasell girls in ac- 
tive service. 

One of the sad notes at Commencement 
time was the news of the sudden passing 
away of the father of Nadine Strong. Our 
tenderest sympathy is extended to this dear 
classmate and her family. 
/ Word has come to us recently of the 
marriage of Cornelia Stone '10 to Mr. Ed- 
win Gleason, who is a civil engineer with 
the State Highway Department in Oregon. 
Our heartiest congratulations to this old 
girl and former member of our faculty. / 



Wise: "I see that they are going to have 
umbrellas made square." 

Otherwise: "What for?" 

Wise : "Because they're not safe to leave 
'round." 



LASELL LEAVES 



39 



JOKES 



The Girl : "Meet me tomorrow night at 
the same place at seven o'clock." 

The Boy: "All right. What time will 
you be there?" 



He: "How's my girl today?" 
She, with enthusiasm ! "Just fine !" 
He: "How do you know?" 



The speaker waxed eloquent and after 
his peroration on women's rights he said, 
"When they take our girls, as they 
threaten, away from the co-educational col- 
leges, what will follow ? What will follow ? 
I repeat." And a loud masculine voice in 
the audience replied, "I will." 



Guide (in Yellowstone Park) : "Now, 
ladies, this phenomenon occurs every three 
minutes. Maybe you'd like to look down 
into the geyser before the next eruption." 

Mr. Smithers (calling to wife) : "Not you! 
It's just like you to be late." 



"Mr. Daring," said the director, "in this 
scene a lion will pursue you for five hun- 
dred feet." 

"Five hundred feet?" interrupted the 
actor. 

"Yes, and no more than that — under- 
stand?" 

The hero nodded. "Yes, I understand, 
but does the lion?" 



Ever : "I'm as tall as you are." 
Sharp : "You are not." 
Ever : "Well, my feet go down as far as 
yours." 



"Wise men meditate; only fools are cer- 
tain." 

"Are you sure?" 
"I'm positive." 



First Patient: "What is medicine?" 
Second Patient : "Oh, it's the Doxology." 



"The drinks are on me," said the cus- 
tomer as the waiter upset the tray of cof- 
fee. 



Traveller : "The New York Central train 
leaves this station, does it not?" 

Gateman : "It has done so for a num- 
ber of years and I don't suppose it will take 
it along today." 



They had fallen out of an aeroplane and 
landed on the skylight of a large office 
building. 

"Where are we?" asked the bride, as they 
came through and landed on the floor. 

"Scotland." 

"How do you know?" 

"Didn't you hear Glass-go?" 



Cop : "I think that car was driving on 
the wrong side of the street." 

Inebriate: "Yes, that's the way it struck 
me." 



"Sarah's at the dressmaker's." 
"Oh, having a fit?" 



Little boy, looking at sign, "Hot Dogs, 
10c," "Hey, mister, give me a pup will 
yuh — I only got a nickel." 



"Define Moustachio." 

"It's a bang on the mouth." 



Jeweler (looking at ring) : "You want me 
to carve on this ring 'Henry to Martha'?" 

Young student, thoughtfully: "Yes, but 
don't carve the word 'Martha' too deep." 



Teacher: "Take this sentence, 'Let the 
cow be taken out into the meadow?' What 
mood?" 

Pupil: "The cow." 



"What's that noise, Ethelbert?" 
"That's Paw draggin' his heavy under- 
wear upstairs." 



40 



LASELL LEAVES 



Knick : "Here's a newspaper report that 
says in the production of 'Salome' Nazi- 
mova was all wrapped up in her part." 

Knack: "Sounds impossible judging from 
the movie I saw." 



Hiram : "Well, sir, my shot gun let out 
a roar and there lay a dead wolf ahead of 
us." 

Bored boarder : "How long had it been 
dead ?" 



Chaperon : "Why did you tell him you 
had to. go to the dressing-room for some 
cold cream?" 

Co-ed : "I had to do something to get the 
chap off my hands." 



First Diner: "I see you're enjoying your 

oysters." 

Second Diner: "Howdja guess it?" 
First Diner: "You're eating them with 

relish." 



Second-mate, pointing to inscribed plate 
on deck : "That is where our gallant cap- 
tain fell." 

Elderly lady visitor: "No wonder, I 
nearly tripped over it myself." 



"The Yanks are coming?" hummed the 
dentist, as he prepared for the extraction. 



'Shall we tango?" 

'It's all the same to me." 

'Yes, I noticed that." 



Algy : "I can spot a Brooks tie every 
time." 

Alfy : "Why don't you use a napkin oc- 
casionally." 



Sergeant to colored sentry : "If anything 
moves, you shoot." 

Sentry : "Yas, suh, an' if anything 
shoots, ah moves." 



"Mark my words," said the student as 
she handed in her English theme. 



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LAS ELL LEAVES 41 



THE VALLEY RANCH 




BRAND 

HORSEBACK TRIP IN THE ROCKIES 
FOR YOUNG LADIES 

The party leaves New York in private Pullmans on June 30th, arriving in Cody, Wyoming, 
on July 4th for a day of the famous Cody Stampede, an exhibition of the days of the Old West. 

From this point a forty day saddle and trail trip commences through Yellowstone National 
Park, Jackson's Hole, and the Wyoming Big Game Country, returning to Valley Ranch for a 
few days' visit and the Ranch Roundup before returning East. 

The party is on the go all the time through the most beautiful, interesting, and picturesque 
wild country of America. Seven weeks of solid fun and enjoyment. 

From a Recreational and Educational standpoint this trip can not be duplicated. 

For catalogue giving full information, address: 

JULIAN S. BRYAN, Director 

Valley Ranch Eastern Headquarters 

2044 Grand Central Terminal, 70 East 45th Street, New York 

Telephone Vanderbilt 2335 

FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 




ax 



brothers 



TloRISTS 

QHynue 2Rn0£s, Htnkta mi> Wttti'xbx 

Imported Flower Vases and Sunset Lustre Ware from $1.50 up. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 

CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED Telephone. Beach 6431. 6432 



42 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dangelmayers' Drug Store 

FOR 

REAL SERVICE 


STUDENTS! 

WHEN YOU 

THINK OF 

BUYING 


Whitman's, Page & Shaw, Apollo, Charter 
and Russell's Chocolates 


SCHOOL 
SUPPLIES 
THINK OF 


A fine line of high grade Stationery 
and imported Perfumes 




BOULEVARD PHARMACY 

2090 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 


THE BEACON HILL STATIONERS 

PEMBERTON 7| SQUARE 

Little Building Branch, No. 5 Subway Store 


A FRIEND 


L P. Hollander Co. 

Established 1848 




NEW ATTRACTIVE 




SUITS, COATS, DRESSES, HATS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

appropriate for every Sport 

and Social activity of the 

Young Miss at School 


Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 
57 and 58 N. Market St. Boston 


202-216 Boylston Street 
Boston 



LASELL LEAVES 



43 



The result of 39 years' constant effort, 
all under the same name and manage- 
ment, constantly striving to make it all 
that the name implies: "Better Butter" 



The Fairmont Creamery Company 

37 Commercial Street, Boston, Mass. 



All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary 
should patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and 

colleges. Their goods are reasonable 

and the quality excellent 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BAIN 




BRAND 



FOOD PRODUCTS 

BAIN BROTHERS CO. 

41 India Street, Boston 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



C. R. Corwin Company 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, EGGS 
and POULTRY 

Basement, 2 Faneuil Hall Market 

SOUTH SIDE 
BOSTON, MASS. 



G. FRANCIS JANES, Pres. 
JOHN J. SULLIVAN, Treas. JOHN J. FOLEY, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Quincy Market 

And Basement 1 1 l o South Side Quincy Market 

Telephone Richmond 40 BOSTON 



QUALITY--. 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



44 



LASELL LEAVES 



O. S. REED 

453 LEXINGTON ST., AUBURNDALE 
Agent for Waltham Watches 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
fflttfitr Ipalers 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 




Footwear and Hosiery 

That is up to date in every 
detail, smart and novel, 
yet never too extreme. 

That is always of fine qual- 
ity and workmanship. 

That is priced consistently 
with the value given. 

THAYER McNEIL CO. 

47 Temple Place 1 5 West Street 
414 Boylston Street 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH, 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



(joforiie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for c traw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons 

Inc. 

FURS 

For Fall wear we offer a beautiful 
collection of 

Animal Choker Scarfs 

In Russian and Hudson Bay Sable, Stone 

Marten, Mink, Baum Marten, 

Fisher, Squirrel, etc. 

$15 and Upwards 

364 BoylstOn Street Arlin£o"street 
Established 1858 



LASELL LEAVES 



45 



SMART 



T.E. 



[?&47}f ftOsfiLEY j Qggaj 



•Qo 



WALKING 

SHOES 

In Tan or Black Oxfords or Strap Pumps of distinctive 
character for Fall and Winter wear. 

Hosiery for the Cold Weather in silk, silk wool and wool 




$10.00 



T. E. MOSELEY CO., 160 Tremont St., Boston 



Olds' Kandy Shoppe 

The house of dainty confections, clean 
food, quality ice-cream and good sodas 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



Telephone Richmond 1647, 1648 

ALBERT P. SMITH . GILBERT O. EATON, Mgr. 

SMITH BROTHERS 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
Boston, Mass. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Turnbridge 
Creameries 



FURNITURE 

WHOLESALE 




PURE PRESERVES 

M ade by ourselves from Home Recipe 
Packed in Stone Jars 

A. T. BRIDGES CO., Inc. 

78 Portland St., Boston 

Tel. 577 Haymarket 

Send for price list of over 60 kinds 



PAGE & BAKER CO. 
88-102 Fulton St., 

Telephone Rich. 820 



Boston 



LADIES' AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS 
FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS 

C. A. DONOVAN 

DRY GOODS 

345 Auburn St. Auburndale 



An Asset to the Community's Well-Fare 

The 
Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



46 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E. J. Moneuse, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



LASELL LEAVES 



47 






'©©©ffiXgll 



THE ISLAND CAMP FOR GIRLS 

For Booklet address Mrs. Charles F. Towne 
Lasell Seminary, Auburndale 66, Mass. 




LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Aw. J61 Tremoni St. 131 1 W.bat St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Ha.d Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



GRADUATION GIFTS 



24 inches 
30 " 
36 " 
48 " 




$10.00 
$25.00 
$50.00 
$75.00 



INDESTRUCTIBLE PEARL NECKLACES 

Also* Necklaces in Genuine Amethyst, Crystal, Onyx, Lapis, 

Jade, Topaz and Amber 




NEW WRIST WATCH 

The Case is 18K White Gold — Hand Engraved. The Movement is the reliable 
Bulova — one that we have sold (or years and given splendid satisfaction. 

Price of Watch with Diamonds $1 00 

Price of Watch without Diamonds $50 




F. F. DAVIDSON 



Wholesale^ritair - simmers* 

JEWELEifc.gSr. 

F. F. DAVIDSON. Jr. 







1 



Vol. XXXXIX No. 1 



NOVEMBER, 1923 



^ 



AN EXCLUSIVE MODEL— BY I. MILLER 

at $10.50 

The last word in footwear — demonstrating anew 
the leadership of Fifth Avenue's foremost designer 

Other I. Miller Shoes $8.50 to $16.50 

Exclusively at Hovey's in Boston. Street Floor 




THE "NORWOOD 



The "Norwood," a flat heel 
model in patent, black satin, 
black, log cabin or otter ooze 

$10.50 



C.&ftbVe$ Co. 

F.ctti hi i sheet M&A1 Or 



established t&gi 



Jane Tooher Sports Clothes 

71 1 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 



GYMNASIUM GARMENTS 
MADE TO MEASURE 



OFFICIAL OUTFITTER FOR 

LASELL SEMINARY 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Silhouette Shop 

IS ON AUBURN STREET 

Opposite the Station 

Lunches Dinners 

Afternoon Tea 



ICE CREAM CANDY SODA HOT CHOCOLATE 



CHAS. BAXTER, Prop. Allbumdale Tel. Newton 1202-R 



-wwcffesnk 



TRADE MARK 



"Sportswomen's Headquarters" 

Tremont at Washington at 

West Street Bromfield 

Distinctive and Attractive Women's Apparel 

for Street and Sports Wear 

Topcoats, Overcoats, Raincoats, Suits, Riding Habits, 

Dresses, Knickers, Breeches, Sweaters, Waists, 

Scarfs, Hose, Hats, Shoes 

Complete lines of equipment for all outdoor and indoor sports 

Sportswomen's Headquarters is all that its name 
implies — Outfitter to Sportswomen in every field 
of sport, both the equipment and the clothing 



LASELL LEAVES 




More than 1 00 years in business 



Rooms as fresh as a new frock — 

Let linoleum strike the note in the less formal rooms of your home. 
It comes in such a variety of patterns ; it is so durable, so sanitary, so 
cheerful that it has become almost the standard floor for bedroom, 
bath, kitchen and sun-parlor. 

STAINES ENGLISH INLAID LINOLEUM 

unquestionably surpasses all others in beauty and wear. At PRAY'S, 
the oldest Rug House in America, Staines stocks are most complete 
and surpass in economy, as may be easily proved by comparison. 

$1.65 to $2.65 the yard 

John H. Pray & Sons Co, 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 



Have You Seen the Interior of Waltham's Up-to-Date Jewelry Store? 




THE WALTHAM JEWELRY CO. 



427 MOODY STREET 



E\SELL [EAVES 

Vol. XXXXIX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., NOVEMBER, 1923 No. 1 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Aet of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 



LASELL LEAVES STAFF '23 AND '24 



Editor-in-Chief 




Business Manager 


JOCELYN TONG 


Assistant Literary Editor 
ESTHER PALMER 


ELIZABETH FRICK 


Assistant Editor 




Local Editors 


RUTH BUFFINGTON 


Joke Editors 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 
MARIA PARRY 


ANNA HENDEE 
ELIZABETH NOWELL 


Literary Editor 




Athletic Editor 


DORIS WOODRUFF 




EDITH HADLEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $2.00. Single Copies, 35 cents. 

Three Alumnae Numbers, $1.00 



CONTENTS 

LITERARY 

A Sea Story S. Starr 5 

Apropos of Brothers Dorothy Messenger 6 

EDITORIAL 8 

LOCALS • 10 

ATHLETICS , 11 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 12 

SCHOOL ROSTER 13 

PERSONALS 16 

LASELL CLUB NOTES 28 

JOKES • •,..,, .......... 29 



LASELL LEAVES 




m 



MANAHAN 

^Specialists bis 

SmttrtJlppdreUcMisses 

mow eMbi£ ^^ J 

CoakSMs3buscs 

WrdpsSportQotksSivaiks 

and baj/mikOUh 

28oEohston St» Boston 



id Me 







\>^. 




A SEA STORY 

Those who read the amazing account of a 
first mate's bravery will remember that the 
Lug-ana sailed from Alexandria on April 19, 
1906. 

Down in the depths of her hold were stowed 
away several hundred bales of long-fiber 
Egyptian cotton to be unloaded in a Moroccan 
port late on the night of the 22nd. But as the 
sky paled with the dawn of that day there 
was something in the haggard face of the 
captain that spread foreboding among the un- 
trained Egyptian crew watching him pace rest- 
lessly to and fro on the bridge — back and 
forth, back and forth — as he had paced all 
night. 

He knew, as they did not, that the Lugana 
must be somewhere just off the coast of Sicily, 
and although they had felt the heavy seas 
raking her all night and were terrified at the 
fury of the tropic storm, they could not un- 
derstand that the coamings would not resist 
such a sea for long, and that as soon as they 
were smashed, the hatches would let in the 
whole ocean as though a dam had given way. 

The captain was thinking of the women on 
board and of his crew. He had not been 
thinking seriously until about three bells, when 
he fancied he could detect a slight uneven- 
ness in the ship's rolling. She seemed to hang 
just one sickening moment longer on the star- 
board side than on the port, though the erratic 
pitching kept him uncertain about this for an 
hour. Then, at four bells, he had to face the 
fact that she did not return normally from 
the roll to starboard and he was arguing des- 



perately with himself that he dared not leave 
the bridge to verify his suspicions when a tall 
wiry form brought up beside him and a deep 
voice shouted above the roar, "Do you feel 
that list to starboard, sir?" The captain 
wheeled about tensely. "Yes," he yelled, "what 
about it?" — "She's filling up through the 
hatches and the cargo's soaking it in like a 
sponge" came back the answering shout. Then 
suddenly both figures swayed sideways with 
that little balance peculiar to seamen. "Good 
God," gasped the captain, "she isn't making 
the return, Mathews !" The other was watch- 
ing the starboard rail ; a great green wave 
blotted it from view, but before it retreated 
over the side he had leapt from the bridge and 
was booming orders down among the frenzied 
mob of Egyptians. 

A boat was lowered and the women and 
seven men placed in it; the rest, facing a 
marine disaster for the first time, refused to 
enter, refused in fact, to do anything. 

Wave after wave covered the starboard side 
and did not entirely retreat. Finally the rail 
was awash and Mathews knew it was useless 
to attempt to clear the remaining starboard 
boats. With the other three white men on 
board he climbed to the port side, now at a 
dizzy height above the foaming sea, and with 
his case knife cut the lashings of the life- 
boats, now swinging far inboard, due to the 
ship's slant. Then the little band undertook 
the unheard-of feat of launching a port boat 
over the starboard rail. 

Second by second the ship's list grew 
greater, — now she was lying helpless, beaten 



LASELL LEAVES 



in the relentless seas, her whole starboard 
deck awash ; when suddenly, as if with a sigh 
of surrender, she gave a great heave and lay 
completely over on her side, half of her bulk 
submerged, and her deck, once swarming with 
terror-stricken blacks, now bare. But the 
three white men still clung to the port rail 
and kept on with their work. The life-boat 
now hung high above the smoke stack, which 
pointed like a huge finger to the deep. Math- 
ews lowered away and she slid down the great 
pipe into the ocean. He cut five of the after 
strands, but the last caught and retained her ; 
so leaning over the gunwale he slashed blindly 
in the water and by the rarest luck severed the 
final strand, pushing her free only an instant 
before the Lugana gave one last lurch and 
turned turtle. 

With her was lost the one other real hero 
on board, an old Egyptian, who stayed at the 
wheel and sank with the ship. But Mathews, 
out in the other boat, was making superhuman 
efforts to save those still on the surface. 

Man after man was dragged in until there 
were two on each oar and the little boat sank 
low with their weight. Despite Mathews' cool 
head and hand at the stern the boat slipped, 
once, twice, three times, into the trough of the 
sea, and to the woman watching from the 
other boat it seemed a miracle that they were 
not swamped. She forgot herself, her oar, 
everything but that other foundering life-boat 
with the tall figure in the stern, forcing those 
frenzied blacks to row, though many had never 
handled an oar before. Once she saw him 
start up, every muscle in his powerful arm 
quivering, but on the instant he had grasped 
the rudder again, holding the boat true in the 
face of overwhelming odds — then she lost her 
grasp on everything and all was black, empty 
gulf through which she sank, — and sank and 
sank. Was there no end — no bottom to this 
space ? 

Ah ! Something tangible and strong beneath 
her that caught and held her surely ! With 
an effort she opened her eyes and looked up. 
Darkness— then gradually the square chin, 
white face and anxious searching eyes of the 



same figure that had last stood at the stern of 
the other life-boat — "Mathews!" 

At her cry something in his face relaxed. 
He flinched and the strong arm that lowered 
her to the ground quivered spasmodically as 
it had once at the rudder. 

"You are hurt ?" "No, No !" he answered, 
evading her eyes, and as she came close to him 
he added, grasping his wrist with the other 
hand, "No, no, I'm not hurt, but — ," apolo- 
getically, still avoiding her look, — "Too 
damned bad, we had her all cleaned up and 
painted up and then she had to go and sink." 

S. Starr. 



APROPOS OF BROTHERS 

Ellen Lu had always wanted a baby brother. 
Ever since the days of her infancy the long- 
ing for a fellow-playmate had tortured her 
heart. The days when memory began to play 
its part in her life were filled with envy of 
other little girls who had baby brothers. But 
her childish tears were wasted and the fervent 
pleas sent up to heaven brought no little baby 
brother. 

When Ellen Lu was twelve years old she 
was sent away to boarding-school. This de- 
lighted her because now she had plenty of 
company. A peculiar change came over Ellen 
Lu during her first winter away from home. 
Sometimes on cold nights a half dozen or more 
girls swathed in woolly blankets would congre- 
gate on some cozy, pillowy cot, to nibble pick- 
les, giggle and talk about big brothers. 

Big brothers were particularly nice ! They 
always took little sisters to football games and 
to the races. When they gave parties they 
allowed their little sisters to "stay up" for a 
few dances with the most intimate of "the 
gang". When it rained hard they never failed 
to drive their little sisters to school in the car. 
And, best of all, they played with them when 
days were dull. All this devotion and more, 
too, was forthcoming, — until the big brother 
acquired a sweetheart ! And Ellen Lu began 
to think how nice it would be to have a big 
brother. 



LASELL LEAVES 



One day in the early spring Ellen Lu had 
an unexpected summons to hurry home. When 
she met Daddy at the station, she noticed an 
unusual absent-mindedness, though he seemed 
overjoyed in seeing his little daughter again. 
When she rushed through the door "slam- 
bang," she half stumbled over a pink and white 
bassinet which had somehow found its way 
to the hall to greet her. "Hello!" Ellen Lu 
recoiled. Then something of a reddish hue 
wiggled ever so slightly under the silky puff. 
A little bald head of satin rose put in a sud- 
den appearance. A scrawny little fist of shad- 
ed carmine, with fingers of white, shot forth 
from a fuzzy white sleeve. Two big blue 
eyes opened and sent a trusting glance around 
the room. The little red nose wrinkled ; the 
eyes squinted ; the little mouth yawned wide ; 
— then followed ear-piercing shrieks and heart- 
rending howls. 

"How do you like him, honey?" came her 
mother's voice from somewhere. Ellen Lu's 
expression was indescribable — surprise, pleas- 
ure, awe, anger and hurt chased across her 
freckled face. She whirled on her father. 
"That!" she wailed, "Oh, Daddy, after all 
these years why didn't they send a bigger 
one?" and she flung herself into her father's 
arms and cried. 

The mists are clearing! There are dim 
lights. All is yet foggy — but wait ! The last 
thin tissue of grey film rises ! 

Behold ! We see a ballroom ! The walls 
are draped in black velvet. The curtains are 
lacy orange. Oriental lanterns of dazzling 
ochre, royal purple, Chinese vermilion, hazy 
blue, and soft, weird green, hang from the 
dark ceiling — hang by cords of twisted silk, 
— swing back and forth in lazy disregard of 
time. Against the draperies here and there 
blushing candles flicker. 

As our eyes become accustomed to these 
dull lights we notice moving objects. People! 
Ah, then, this is a costume dance ! See those 
clowns, Teddy bears, trench dolls, Egyptian 
princesses, sheiks, Indians ! all gliding smooth- 
ly back and forth. Hark! if you listen care- 



fully, you can hear music ! Yes, it comes from 
that corner where the palms and vines so clev- 
erly conceal the musicians. Hear how the peo- 
ple are laughing and chatting — it is indeed a 
happy party ! 

Just glimpse that fascinating couple, — that 
manly Pierrot and that darling Pierrette — 
Alas ! the fogs descend ! Blackness sweeps 
upon us and we must wait as we have waited 
- — with patience. A rush of air ! The clouds 
lift, sink back, rise again. Mysterious black- 
ness, — we rub our eyes, and again are with 
our friends, Pierrot and Pierrette. They have 
drawn a little aside from the dancers. He 
whispers to her. She laughs. He takes her 
hand and they skip merrily to that corner yon- 
der. 

Horrors ! A great, black kettle, large 
enough to hold a man, swings above the blaz- 
ing fire. In it sizzles and sputters a seething 
sea of green lava. From it belches red smoke. 
Look up ! Look higher ! A grinning face 
mocks us from the haze of red ! Back again ! 
A miserable witch rises from the pot of mys- 
tery and slinks toward our friends. The 
wretched face of sickly yellow twists into a 
grin. The toothless cavern of mouth utters 
a harsh sound. Pierrette shudders and Pier- 
rot presses her hand reassuringly. The witch 
slips far off into a mystic trance. A scrawny 
finger is laid beside the ghastly nose of the 
mask. From a voice of uncanny hollo wness 
come these words : "Go ye yonder, my pretty 
ones, to the further end of the porch! Gaze 
ye at the moon. It is held to-night in the hands 
of those who forecast our future! Listen long 
and ye shall hear — " 

Already they have turned to carry out the 
advice of this horrible person. The witch 
gazes after them, then sinks again into the 
pot and bursts into fiendish laughter. 

My ! it is cold out here on the porch, but 
there are our friends sitting on the railing. 
I should think Pierrette's bare arms would be 
cold. She shivers. He offers her his jacket, 
but she shakes her head. All right, he will 
be cold then, too. The only solution— he closes 
(Continued on page 9) 




? 













OUR STUDENT COUNCIL 

One of the first things to be desired in any 
group which is banded together for a common 
purpose is harmony. If there is constant fric- 
tion or continued diversion from the main 
track, the group as a whole becomes less 
effectual. In this school there are certain 
regulations to be observed in order that the 
greatest possible number of students may bene- 
fit by them. If only out of consideration for 
our neighbors it befits each of us to follow 
these established rules. The instrument most 
concerned with our conduct and privileges is 
the Student Council. Our Blue Book will 
tell us that the Student Council in no way 
represents a bullying policeman with a solid 
night-stick, or an arbitrary judge, but a group 
of unselfish, hard-working girls, whose chief 
aim is not to inflict penalties upon detected 
sinners (in fact, if anything, they find it a 
trifle more disagreeable than do the sinners), 
but rather to promote harmony among the 
student body and between students and fac- 
ulty. Without some sort of supervision, un- 
less we have the honor system, it is impossible 
not to have a great number of girls disregard- 
ing minor rules, or in a few cases, openly 
violating major regulations. It is unfair to 
put the entire responsibility of supervising our 
conduct upon the faculty. The Student Coun- 
cil represents the wishes of the majority of the 
students when it attempts to see that these 
rules are enforced. 

But this is only one side of the question. 
Often regulations are considered too stringent 
by the students or perhaps they desire some 



privilege which has not been accorded to them. 
The Student Council is the instrument through 
which their wishes are made known and 
through which they appeal against decisions 
with which they are dissatisfied. The Stu- 
dent Council represents each one of us. When 
we elect a girl for Student Council each o-f 
us endorses the Council, and in a sense 
pledges it our sincere encouragement and 
support. 



SCHOOL SPIRIT 

There's so much fun and pep embodied in 
these two little words, which represent the 
best for which Lasell stands. We are all 
going out for hockey, or basket ball, or tennis, 
and, perhaps later, crew ; but how many of us 
ever think seriously of "going out" for Lasell? 
Even if we can't be on the team and gather in 
laurels for our Alma Mater, where could there 
be wilder excitement or more concentrated pep 
than in keeping things going on the side lines. 
Every true Lasell girl goes out for every game 
and every true Lasell girl cheers for all she's 
worth — "Dear Alma Mater, we cheer thy vic- 
torv." 



OUR WORTHWHILE CLUBS 

"Give to the world the best you have and 
the best will come back to you." 

Now is the time for each one to come for- 
ward and show the directions toward which 
her abilities tend. Dramatic Club, Orphean, 
Glee Club and Mandolin, — in which one of 
these will you be a shining star? It may be 
in all four. 



LASELL LEAVES 



Dramatic Club is intensely interesting and 
gives great opportunity for developing dra- 
matic ability. One may become a member by 
joining an expression class, and who knows 
but that she may take part in one of the ex- 
cellent plays which are produced during the 
year. It does not take much effort on your 
part, girls, to become a member of the Or- 
phean Club, which annually provides one of 
the best entertainments at Lasell. After once 
becoming a member, do not forget its meetings 
on Wednesday at four o'clock. A well trained 
voice is an honor when it enables one to be- 
long to the Lasell Glee Club. One of the 
finest features of the year is our final Glee 
Club Concert. Under their competent direc- 
tor, Mr. Harper, the Glee Club members 
achieve splendid results. Here is your chance, 
new girls ! The Mandolin Club alto ; is one 
of Lasell's great assets, so if you' 'play any 
kind of an instrument do not fail to come and 
lend to the best of your ability, your support 
to this Club. If by chance you are unfor- 
tunate enough not to be an active member of 
any of the above mentioned Clubs, become at 
"once a silent member of all, by giving your 
hearty support at all times. Let the true 
Lasell spirit be the backing of all the Lasell 
Clubs. 



Lasell! 

Mist-shaded darkness, fragrant night air, 
Warmly glowing nests of rooms, inviting every- 
where. 
Happy, merry hosts of girls, all without a care. 
Just girls — the heart of Lasell! 

Dorothy G. Schumaker. 



A NEW GIRL'S IMPRESSION 

Lasell! 

One big building on a leaf-strewn hill, 

A gray-pebbled driveway, tree-shadowed still, 

Gay-sweatered girls on their way to the "vill," 

All of it — part of Lasell. 

Lasell! 

Long, dim hallways, pierced by gleeful shrieks, 
Whispering groups of girls, in re-united cliques, 
Senior class favorites, with much-kissed cheeks, 
All of it — part of Lasell! 

Lasell! 

A slim, black, elm tree outside my window-frame ; 
Autumn-gilded leaves, tinted none the same, 
A thousand golden quivers in the sunset flame, 
All of it — part of Lasell! 

Lasell! 

Bright lights all around, happy, hungry clatter, 
All eyes resting on a hot, steaming platter, 
Little, ripply laughs, and a gay talk patter, 
All of it— part of Lasell! 



IT'S YOU 

If your studies go wrong 
And the days seem blue, 

It isn't the school, dear girl, 
It's you. 

If teachers seem cross 
And their praises few, 

It isn't their fault, dear girl, 
It's you. 

If skies are grey 

With no signs of blue, 
Make sunshine, girl, 

It's up to you. 

Oh, don't blame the school 
For each fault you brew, 

For it isn't the school, 
But only you. 



APROPOS OF BROTHERS 

(Continued from page 7) 

his arms about her. They are no longer 
masked, but it is so dark we cannot see their 
faces. Hush ! They kiss ! 

C-C-Crash ! The door behind us swings 
wide. The witch springs forth unmasked. He 
is a little boy, with a roguish, freckly face. 
His eyes snap with glee. He giggles ! How 
Pierrot and Pierrette jump! She shrinks back 
from him. In the light that comes from the 
open door we can see her face. It is Ellen 
Lu whom we met eight long years ago. She 
is beautiful ! Her face is flushed ! Her eyes 
are bright with anger ! 

"You!" she cries, pointing at the little fel- 
low. 

The child laughs. 

"That was my trick!" he squeals, pointing 
his finger at brave Pierrot. "I knew you and 
her was in love. Now I can prove it to mam- 
ma," and he rushes in the door again. 

Ellen Lu turns to Pierrot. Shall she laugh 
or cry? 

"That? That? Oh, Pierrot, that is— is 
my baby brother !" and she hides her face in 
the shelter of his arms. 

Dorothy Messenger. 



f 




On September 18, Lasell opened her doors 
to welcome her 1923-4 family, which crowded 
the halls with old girls and new. It is need- 
less to speak of the joy the old girls felt at 
being back again, and the new girls, in spite 
of the strangeness of it all, seemed glad, too. 
Of course there were no classes, but every 
one was busy attending to her program and 
in talking over the summer's events. Then 
there were a few changes in Lasell which had 
to be discussed : one of these was the formal 
opening of the Library, into which the old 
Chapel had been transformed. We are all de- 
lighted with the new arrangement, the cen- 
tral location, the spacious room and abundant 
light. Thursday morning we were genuinely 
glad to find ourselves in the Chapel and to hear 
the rules and regulations set forth by Dr. Win- 
slow and Mr. Towne. 

Wednesday night, September 19, we all en- 
joyed an informal get-together dance in the 
assembly room. The orchestra, which had 
played during the dinner hour, furnished the 
music and every one had a good time. It was 
a reunion for the old girls and a chance to 
get acquainted for the new girls. An evening 
like this starts the year right at Lasell. 

The Seniors started the class activities by 
holding their election on Friday, September 
21. The next morning in Chapel the follow- 
ing officers were announced : President, 



Frances Badger ; Vice-President, Katherine 
Webb ; Secretary, Dorothy Barnard ; Treas- 
urer, Edith Hadley; Song Leader, Helen 
Schroer ; Cheer Leader, Gertrude Wragg. 
After the elections were held, the Seniors sere- 
naded the new girls in Bragdon, Bancroft 
and Woodland. 

Saturday, September 22, the Christian En- 
deavor and Missionary Societies joined in 
giving us a party in the assembly room, at 
which Katherine Webb presided. In addition 
to the dancing we were entertained delight- 
fully by recitations from Louise Woolley '23 
and Gertrude Wragg '24, which were fol- 
lowed by a relay race. 

Somehow the first Sunday away from home 
is the hardest for the new girls and because 
of this the Seniors have followed the custom 
of holding an informal house-warming in each 
Senior house. Here, for an evening of quiet 
fun, to each of the four senior houses the old 
girls brought their new girls, and the Seniors 
gladly lent themselves for the entertainment 
of their guests. Monologues, musical selec- 
tions and songs were amongst the stunts, and 
after light refreshments all joined in an "old- 
fashioned sing". 

In the parlors of historic Bragdon, — a fit- 
ting place for the opening meeting, — Helen 
Schroer, the new President of the organiza- 
tion, led the first meeting of the Christian 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



Endeavor Society. All of us were much im- 
pressed by the enthusiasm shown at the gath- 
ering. Helen's message appealed strongly to 
us all and we were delighted with Miriam 
Smith's solo. 

Friday, September 28, was Initiation Day 
at Lasell. In spite of the many ordeals 
through which they went, the new girls proved 
their sportsmanship. The day was devoted to 
stunts in which the new girls figured promi- 
nently, the costume consisting of thirteen 
braids, middies and skirts worn inside out and 
"back to," a mis-mating of shoes and stock- 
ings, and a conspicuous placard, distinguishing 
the new girls from the old. All were enthu- 
siastic over the way in which the new girls 
took their initiation and we are sure now that 
they are proved true Lasell girls. 

Saturday, September 29, marks the success- 
ful beginning of the year 1923-1924. The first 
real party, the old girls' welcome to the new, 
was held in the assembly room. Dance or- 
ders were artistically decorated with Lasell 
blue. The fun continued until half past ten. 
Refreshments of punch and the ever popular 
ice cream cones were served during the course 
of the evening and the party was voted unan- 
imously a brilliant success. 

The Athletic Association held a meeting 
Oct. 2, with its president, Frances Badger, 
presiding, and elected the following officers : 
Helen Mclntire, Vice-President; Barbara 
dishing, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Friday evening, Oct. 5, Christian Endeavor 
was led by Frances Badger. She spoke of the 
necessity of school spirit and of individual 
responsibility. 

The Student Council for 1923-4 has been 
chosen as follows : President, Edith Clendenin ; 
Gardner, Helen Perry ; Carpenter, Virginia 
Stevens and Dorothy Barnard; Hawthorne, 
Katherine Knox ; Clark, Leonore Belber ; Ban- 
croft, Catherine Kelly ; Main, Claire Stritz- 
inger and Catherine Beecher; Woodland, 
Pauline Gagne, Sarah Barnum and Alberta 
Wight. 



ATHLETICS 

Neiv Girls, — I say new girls because I know 
that all of the old girls realize the important 
part athletics play in our school life — it is up 
to every one of you, whether you go out for 
the sports or not, to join our Athletic Asso- 
ciation and back up the team. The dues are 
only a small sum and there is absolutely no 
reason why we cannot have a 100% enroll- 
ment for this year. 

There are two ways in which you can help 
the Athletic Association — first, pay your dues 
early ; second, go out for the different kinds 
of sports that are offered by the school. 

Field Hockey practice has begun. Why not 
make this year a winning one for Lasell? 

This can be accomplished if every girl who 
possibly can will come out and give her sup- 
port to the team. Whether you have ever 
played before or not, come to every practice 
and in a short time you will learn to under- 
stand, to be a part of, and to love the game. 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Every one is much pleased with the way 
in which the girls have responded to the call 
for field hockey candidates. There are now 
enough girls reporting- for practice to form 
three teams. Edith Hadley has been elected 
Captain, and Dorothy Redman, Manager. 

The first squad has already been chosen, 
subject to change. 

Center — Edith Hadley. 

Center Half — Betty Saxton. 

Left Inside — Ella Robbins. 

Left Wing — Barbara Cushing. 

Right Inside — Esther Fairchild. 

Right Wing — Helen Mclntire. 

R. Half Back — Catherine Brown. 

L. Half Back — Victoria Jackson. 

R. Full Back — Dorothy Redman. 

L. Full Back— Ruth Buffington. 

Goal — Frances Badger. 



f 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

A lovely morning greeted us on September 
18,: and we feel it to be symbolic of the spirit 
of the school group — at the beginning of this 
— our sixth year. We are graduating from 
infancy and we find ourselves growing gradu- 
ally — a natural and wholesome growth. Our 
house numbered 23 pupils last year and we 
started this year with 35. The largest increase 
is in our ninth grade which corresponds to the 
first year of High School. Last year's class 
had 5 house pupils and 2 day pupils. This 
year's class started with 15 house pupils and 
7 day pupils and 1 house pupil has been added, 
making a total of 23. Our total enrollment to 
date is 55. 

Sept. 20: Miss Caroline F. Chase, the first 
music teacher at Woodland Park, was with 
us for our first chapel and played for our 
singing. 
Sept. 22 : Our annual "First Saturday Pic- 
nic" — to Echo Bridge. Everybody went and 
everybody had a right good time ! This is 
a hike of six miles through the Metropolitan 
Park System. In the evening the "old 
girls" entertained the "new girls" at a dance 
in the living room followed by a marshmal- 
low toast. 
Sept. 23 : Mrs. Julia DeWitt Reed, Mrs. Ed- 
na Thurston Fallett and Miss Susan Stry- 
ken — all former Lasell students, visited 
Woodland Park. 
Sept. 29 : Tradition says "Concord and Lex- 
ington" for our second Saturday, and a fine 
day helped us to carry out our plan. Miss 
Hemmeon and Miss Elderkin accompanied 
all the house pupils. Part of the day pupils 
also took advantage of this opportunity to 
have a history lesson given under perfect 
conditions. 
Sept. 30 : Dr. and Mrs. Winslow and Mr. and 
Mrs. Towne joined us at "Tea" in our liv- 
ing room. Do our friends at Lasell know 
how joyously we welcome them at the Sun- 
day afternoon tea hour? 
Oct. 5 : The Junior High School grades at- 
tended an afternoon lecture at Bragdon Hall 
given by Dr. Leon H. Vincent. In the even- 



ing the same group, accompanied by Miss 
Hemmeon and Miss Elderkin, saw "The 
Covered Wagon" in Boston. 

Oct. 6: Miss Williams and Mrs. Lambert 
chaperoned the younger girls to "The Cov- 
ered Wagon". 

Oct. 11: Mrs. McDonald had a pleasant call 
from Marion Eaton, Lasell, '20. 

Oct. 12 : The parents of several of our pupils 
were our guests at Chapel when we met to 
do honor to the discoverer of America. Our 
guest of honor was Mrs. Eva Earll Furlong, 
who spoke to us fittingly. Mrs. Furlong has 
been the head of our English department for 
four years. Recognizing her unusual abili- 
ties Lasell has claimed more and more of 
her time each year, and this year her work 
is all at the "Upper School". Mrs. Furlong 
has left us a high standard of work ; even 
more than that — she has been a constant in- 
spiration to high ideals, steadfast purpose 
and a fine courage. 

Mrs. Furlong's address was followed by a 
short play written by Maxine Lawrence. The 
prologue was delivered by the author. The 
several parts were as follows : 

King Ferdinand Natalie Best 

Queen Isabella Alice Conklin 

Christopher Columbus ....Gwendolyn McDonald 

Son of Columbus Jean Goodrich 

Monk Mona Towle 

Herald Virginia Amesbury 

Sailors and Indians. 

Oct. 13 : The girls who had passed their 
swimming test at Lasell were taken canoeing 
by Miss Williams. Nearly all the girls of 
the school swim well and are able to enjoy 
the swimming privileges at Bragdon Hall 
on Saturday mornings. 

Oct. 24 : We were honored on Wednesday, 
October 24, when Miss Potter dined with 
the Junior School. Miss Potter spoke to 
each girl after dinner and spent a short 
time with us in "Junior House." 

Oct. 26 : Marian Rogers came to spend week- 
end at Woodland Park. A call from Miss 
Crockett, former history teacher at Wood- 
land Park and Lasell. 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Oct. 27: The best day of all! At 4.30 p. m. 
we were all here — teachers, day and house 
pupils in knickers and middies and gay Hal- 
lowe'en caps, for we celebrate Hallowe'en 
on the nearest Saturday. The big bonfire 
was lighted on a big open space far from 
our building and carefully guarded by our 
own Mr. Harper. The long sticks were 
soon stretching to the fire — on the end of 
each a frankfurt and a long slice of 
bacon — and the best "hot dogs" that ever 
were eaten filled the air with a delicious 
odor. Ginger ale, doughnuts, cheese, piles 
of fresh rolls, big red apples, — what more 
could mortals ask ! But we had more ! In 
the living room we toasted marshmallows 
over the crackling grate fire, for no one 
could wait till the fire burned down to 
glowing coals. A jolly dance, coffee for the 
grown-ups, and a tired, happy lot of girls 
declared it the best Hallowe'en. We were 
glad to welcome Elizabeth Borst, whose 
guests we have been for three consecutive 
Hallowe'en parties at the famous "Little 
Tree Farm." 

We are glad to welcome to our teaching 
staff: Miss Ruth I. Elderkin, who is teacher 
of History, Latin and Algebra ; Mrs. Jean 
Goodrich, pianoforte ; Miss Eleanor Mulloy, 
'cello ; Miss Ruth Furlong, sports director. 

Under Mrs. Goodrich's direction a small or- 
chestra is forming at Woodland Park. The 
members are: piano, Marjorie Schaller; 'cello, 
Frances Robertson ; violins, Dorothy Smith, 
Marjorie Winslow and Gwendolyn McDonald. 



SCHOOL ROSTER 
1923-1924 

Adams, Dorothy, Dorchester 
Adams, Esther, Quincy 
Aitken, Marjorie, Orange, N. J. 
Anderson, A. Elizabeth, Toledo, Ohio 
Anderson, Margaret, Lebanon, Ohio 
Areson, Hortense, Roxbury 
Avery, Blanche, Greenfield 
Badger, Frances, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Bailey, Mozelle, Mechanic Falls, Me. 
Ballou, Avis, Providence, R. I. 



Barden, Elizabeth, Marion 
Bardwell, Gertrude, Turners Falls 
Barnard, Dorothy, Concord, N. H. 
Barnum, Sarah P., San Francisco, Cal. 
Barrett, Clara, Butte, Montana 
Batchelder, A. Elizabeth, N. Reading 
Bauer, Elsa S., Lewiston, Me. 
Bavier, Mabel C, Melrose 
Bean, Hope, Presque Isle, Me. 
Beecher, Catherine, Lawrence 
Belber, Leonore, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bennett, Margaret, Guilford, Me. 
Berkson, Helene M., Larchmont, N. Y. 
Biggin, Dorothy, Sharon, Pa. 
Bigham, Adele, Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Black, Helen M., Deep River, Conn. 
Bland, Carrie, Little Rock, Ark. 
Bliss, Frances, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Boucher, Marie, Bradford 
Bridgman, Barbara, Ware. 
Brill, Mary Campbell, Jamesburg, N. J. 
Brooks, Marion, Naples, Me. 
Brown, Catherine, Watertown, N. Y. 
Brown, Emily, Monsey, N. Y. 
Brunner, Virginia, Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Bryant, Lois, Hartford, Conn. 
Buffington, Ruth, Omaha, Neb. 
Bullis, Glenna Eloise, New Haven, Conn. 
Bunnell, Margaret, Pelham, N. Y. 
Candy, Charlotte, Cape Cottage, Me. 
Case, Emily, West Hartford, Conn. 
Casey, Eleanor, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Chace, Elinor, Providence, R. I. 
Chamberlin, Christine, Swampscott 
Chambers, Helen, Roselle, N. J. 
Chandler, Evelyn P., New Gloucester, Me. 
Chase, Marietta, Winthrop 
Clark, Eleanor, Newton 
Clarke, Margaret, Woodcliffe Lake, N. J. 
Clendenin, Edith, Ferguson, Mo. 
Clow, Ethel, Wolfboro, N. H. 
Clough, Charlena, Irasburg, Vt. 
Cook, Dorothy E., Orange, N. J. 
Copeland, Brenda, Rochester, N. H. 
Corbin, Marion W., Hartford, Conn. 
Cottrell, Elizabeth, Quincy, 111. 
Crooke, Phyllis, Meriden, Conn. 
Cruise, Katherine, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Cushing, Barbara, Groveton, N. H. 
Daugherty, Matilda, Indianapolis, Ind. 
DeWolf, Mary, Warren, R. I. 
Dick, Alyce, Auburn, Me. 
Dreher, Virginia, Lansford, Pa. 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



Duffy, Elsie, Lawrence 

Dunning, Ruth, Bangor, Me. 

Durkee, Annette, Lynn 

Edwards, Harriet, Hartford, Conn. 

Ehrhart, Mary, Hanover, Pa. 

Eisman, Jean, Charleston, W. Va. 

Ellsworth, Miriam, Barre 

Fairchild, Esther, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Finegan, Margaret L., Dorchester 

Finn, Edwina, Brookline 

Finney, Frances, Malone, N. Y. 

Fish, Martha, Canton 

Fletcher, Lora, Clinton 

Frick, Elizabeth, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Gagne, Pauline, Cambridge 

Garvin, Ruth, Sanford, Me. 

Goddu, Audrey, Winchester 

Goodloe, Eleanor, Louisville, Ky. 

Gordon, Margaret, Hazardville, Conn. 

Greene, Lydia, Eagleville, Conn. 

Greenough, Mauriel, Willmar, Minn. 

Hadley, Edith, Arlington 

Hagadorn, Dorothy, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Hall, Margaret, Meredith, N. H. 

Hambleton, Vera, Methuen 

Hammond, Elizabeth, West Newton 

Hansen, Helen, Elkhart, Ind. 

Hart, Edna, Winthrop 

Harvey, Esther, Newton Centre 

Harvey, Harriet, Woodbury, Conn. 

Hasanovitz, Sonia, Boston 

Hedden, Margaret, E. Orange, N. J. 

Hegeman, Louise, Mittineague 

Hendee, Anna, Augusta, Me. 

Hessin, Phyllis, Stamford, Conn. 

Higgins, Irene May, Hyde Park 

Hitchins, Marjorie, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Holabird, Ruby, North Haven, Conn. 

Hopkins, Lucile, New Preston, Conn. 

Howes, Marion, Bangor, Me. 

Irish, Elizabeth, Buckfield, Me. 

Jacobs, Bella, El Paso, Texas 

Jackson, Victoria, Centre Island, Toronto, Can. 

Jagger, Marjorie, Sanford, Me. 

Jameson, Mary Elizabeth, St. Louis, Missouri 

Jenney, Estelle, Roxbury 

Johnson, Elizabeth, Lowell 

Johnson, R., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Johnston, Marie, Brookline 

Johnston, Merle, White Plains, N. Y. 

Keeler, Dorothy, Westboro 

Kelley, Katherine, Lansing, Mich. 

Kendall, Gertrude, Dunstable 

Kirby, Marion, Auburndale 



Knox, Katherine, Connellsville, Pa. 

Kotzen, Beatrice, Maiden 

Krakauer, Anita, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Krakauer, Bertha, Chihuahua, Mexico 

Ladd, Evelyn, Enosburg Falls, Vt. 

Lalley, Catherine, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Landon, Helen, Park Ridge, N. J. 

Lang, Ruth, Roslindale 

Larrabee, Julia, Lawrence 

Lee, Elizabeth, Morris, Conn. 

Levi, Sylvia, Port Chester, N. Y. 

Libbey, Alice, West Newton 

Loewe, Ella, Danbury, Conn. 

Lonval, Margaret, Swampscott 

Lougee, Arline, Laconia, N. H. 

Lougee, Doris, Laconia, N. H. 

Love, Evadene, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Lucas, Alta, Springfield 

Lummus, Isabel, Lynn 

Lunn, Betty, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Luscomb, J. Louise, Tiverton, N. Y. 

Macartney, Elin K., Ft. Covington, N. Y. 

MacCutcheon, Mildred, Summit, N. J. 

MacKay, Jean, Athol 

McCaghey, Alice, Little Falls, N. Y. 

McDermott, Anne, Allston 

McGee, Lillian, Cochituate 

McGoldrick, Claire, Watertown 

Mclntire, Helen, Boston 

McLauthlin, Muriel, Brookline 

McMurray, Agnes, Portland, Ore. 

McNab, Helen, Baltimore, Md. 

Madfis, Bertha, Chestnut Hill 

Main, Evelyn H., Detroit, Mich. 

Martin, Ruth, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Matteson, Jessie, Chicago, 111. 

Mayes, Ruth, Charlotte, N. C. 

Merritt, Florence, S. Portland, Me. 

Messenger, Dorothy E., Auburndale 

Meurer, Peggy L., New York, N. Y. 

Miles, Marian, Wolfboro, N. H. 

Miller, Josephine, Stamford, Conn. 

Morgan, Ethella, Providence, Rhode Island 

Morong, Lillian, Portland, Me. 

Mortimer, Eva-May, Evanston, 111. 

Moxon, Dorothy, Willimantic, Conn. 

Mueller, E. Louisa, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Murray, M. Marguerite, Bangor, Me. 

Mustard, Louise, Wellesley Hills 

Naka, Yukiko, Tokyo, Japan 

Needham, Marjorie, Princeton 

Nelson, Doris, Gloucester 

Niday, Margaret, Boise, Idaho 

Norris, Lucile, Chicago, 111. 

Nowell, Elizabeth, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Noves, Ethel, Danvers 

O'Hare, Mary, St. Elmo, 111. 

Page, Mary Frances, Ayer 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



Palmer, Esther, Lynn 
Parker, Bernice, Springfield 
Parker, Helen, Faneuil 
Parker, Sylvia, Winchester 
Parry, Lydia, Summit, N. J. 
Parry, Maria, Summit, N. J. 
Parsons, Eleanor, Brighton 
Pearson, Dorothy, Evanston, 111. 
Perry, Helen, Maiden 
Powdrell, Gertrude, Wellfleet 
Powell, Ruth, Cleveland Heights, O. 
Ramsdell, Elizabeth, Winchester 
Redman, Dorothy, East Orange, N. J. 
Reynders, Ruth, Springfield 
Richards, Ella, Dorchester 
Rinebold, Eleanor, Athens, Pa. 
Robbins, Ella, Springfield 
Robinson, Marguerite, Brandon, Vt. 
Robson, Helen, Charleston, S. C. 
Robson, Lucile, Charleston, S. C. 
Rodier, Isabel, Norwich, Conn. 
Ross, Kathryne, Middlebury, Vt. 
Royce, Frances, Somersworth, N. H. 
Russell, Charlotte, Providence, R. I. 
Saxton, Elizabeth, Chicago, 111. 
Schroer, Helen, Mansfield, O. 
Schumaker, Dorothy, Lincoln, N. H. 
Spalding, Edith, Brighton 
Speed, Evelyn A., Springfield 
Shaw, Elizabeth, Brookline 47 
Shepard, Letitia, Parnassus, Pa. 
Shepard, Ruth G., Warren 
Simonds, Marian, Pottsville, Pa. 
Sinclair, Marion G., Cambridge 
Small, Hazel, Sagamore 
Smieding, Mary, Racine, Wis. 
Smith, Jean, Cortland, N. Y. 
Smith, Miriam, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Solari, Sylvia, Dorchester 
Staples, Helen, Milford 
Starin, Jeanette, New Haven, Conn. 
Starr, Sylvia, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Steele, Eleanor, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Stevens, Virginia, New Haven, Conn. 
Stoneman, Ruth, Cleveland, O. 
Stover, Madelyn, Rockland, Me. 
Strifert, Helen, Sioux City, la. 
Stritzinger, Claire, Norristown, Pa. 
Strong, Nadine, Allston 
Stultz, Sarah, Clinton, Ind. 
Terhune, Elsie, Fairhaven 
Terry, Helen, Southold, N. Y. 
Thayer, Grace, New Ipswich, N. H. 
Thomas, Betty, Youngstown, Ohio 
Titus, Louise, Dover, N. H. 
Tompkins, Muriel, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Tong, Jocelyn, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tullar, Marion, Schenectady, N. Y. 



Tyler, Florence, Westfield 

Varney, Isabelle, E. Rochester, N. H. 

Vicary, Carolyn, Canton, Ohio 

Virkler, Marguerite, Castorland, N. Y. 

Voltz, Ruth, Chicago, 111. 

Wahlquist, Helen, W. Hartford, Conn. 

Wardwell, Dorothy, W. Paris, Me. 

Warren, Juliet, Boston 

Warren, Virginia, Winchester 

Webb, Katherine, Stamford, Conn. 

Webster, Alice, So. Natick 

Westerhoff, Gertrude, New Haven, Conn. 

Whittaker, Katherine, Newtonville 

Whyte, Mildred, Lynn 

Wight, Alberta, Berklin, N. H. 

Wilcox, Martha, Keokuk, Iowa 

Wilcox, Maude, Westbrook, Conn. 

Wilder, Geraldine, Melrose 

Wilkins, Alice M., Brookline 

Williams, Marguerite, So. Natick 

Wilson, Edith, Brookline 

Woodruff, Doris, E. Orange, N. J. 

Wragg, Gertrude, Norwood 

Wry, Alice, Evanston, 111. 



WOODLAND PARK 

Amesbury, Virginia E., Auburndale 
Angell, Charles F., Jr., Auburndale 
Baxter, Maria, West Roxbury 
Benejam, Lucy, Havana, Cuba 
Benson, Anna Moffatt, Auburndale 
Best, Natalie G., Allston 
Billings, Marjorie, Brighton 
Borden, Preble, Boston 
Braithwaite, Katherine I., Auburndale 
Burke, Helen Jane, E. Chicago, Ind. 
Candy, Hilda A., Cape Cottage, Me. 
Chamberlain, Ruth, Boston 
Conklin, Alice F., Madison, N. J. 
Coombs, Isabel F., Belfast, Me. 
Cummings, Earl C, Newton. 
Cummings, Edith M., Newton. 
Curtis, Gertrude, Troy, N. Y. 
Cushman, Alice, Newton Centre 
Cushman, Lillian, Newton Centre 
Driscoll, May Josephine, Newtonville 
Goodrich, Claudia, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Goodrich, Jean Elizabeth, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Hanscom, Virginia F., Auburndale 
Himelhoch, Marjean, Detroit, Mich. 
Keever, Mary Elizabeth, Auburndale 
Keith, Katherine C, Fitchburg 
Lambert, Norma L., Cambridge 
Lamont, Denice W., Natick 
Lawrence, Hazel E., Lawrence 
Lawrence, L. Maxine, Lawrence 
Maxwell, Alice B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



MacLeod, Verta I., Brighton 
McDonald, Gwendolyn, Ottawa, Ont. 
Rickey, Frances W., Berlin, Conn. 
Robertson, Frances, Melrose 
Robinson, Virginia, Auburndale 
Rogers, Marion A., Watertown 
Root, Bertha B., Winthrop 
Rowbotham, Ruth, New Orleans, La. 
Schaller, Marjorie F. B., Brighton 
Soule, Priscilla R., Auburndale 
Smith, Dorothy Jane, Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Stanton, Huldah M., Hartford, Conn. 
Thompson, Louise M., Middleboro 
Towle, Mona C, South Sudbury 
Walter, Marion D., New Britain, Conn. 
Wells, Elizabeth W., Haverhill 
Whitehead, Lona May, Wellesley 
Wilcox, Betty, West Newton 
Wilcox, Gloria, West Newton 
Wilcox, Hollis, West Newton 
Winslow, Marjorie, Auburndale 
Winslow, Priscilla, Auburndale 




The happy wedding procession of Lasell 
girls is never ending. 

The twenty-fourth of August was the wed- 
ding day of Gertrude Trafton, '19, when she 
became the bride of Mr. John Elmer Good- 
win. After the first of October Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodwin will be at home at 96 Green St., Au- 
gusta, Maine. 

The marriage of Dorothy Caldwell, '22, and 
Mr. Charles A. Jordan, Jr., took place on the 
eighteenth of July. 

The fifteenth of September was the wedding 
day of Theresa Thompson, '22, when she be- 
came the bride of Mr. Donald C. Osborne. 
Mr. and Mrs. Osborne will be at home at 
1325 Union St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

On the fifteenth of August Florence Day, 
'22, was united in marriage with Mr. George 
S. Wentworth. 



The wedding day of Annie Dimond, '18, and 
Mr. Earle S. Day was the fifteenth of Sep- 
tember. 

Stella Sydeman and Mr. Alfred P. Gross- 
man were united in marriage on the seventh 
of June. 

Pauline Ray, '16, became the bride of Mr. 
Clarence M. Hamilton on the twenty-fifth of 
August. 

The first of September was the wedding day 
of Clara Parker, '12, when she became the 
bride of Mr. James T. Colby. 

The wedding day of Dorothy Shove, '21, 
and Mr. Everett A. Kelloway was the thirti- 
eth of August. After the first of November 
Mr. and Mrs. Kelloway will be at home in 
Marshalltown, Iowa. 

Margaret Stewart, '20, was married on the 
sixth of October to Mr. Henry C. Bartlett. 

The wedding day of Grace Warner, '21, 
and Mr. Merton H. Strickland was the fif- 
teenth of September. After the first of No- 
vember Mr. and Mrs. Strickland will be at 
home at 1208 Avenue N, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Marion Tirrell (1919-20) became the wife 
of Mr. Ralph Henning Patterson on October 
fifteenth. 

The sixth of October was the wedding day 
of Elsie Flight, when she became the bride 
of Mr. Carl Wuestefeld at New Haven, Con- 
necticut. 

The engagement announcement of Marion 
Williams, 1917-20, to Mr. Frank Lane Crow- 
ell has been received. 

Rose Louise Baer (1913-1915) became the 
bride of Mr. Mark Luther Peters at Lehigh- 
ton, Pennsylvania, on October third. 

Gladys MacC. Burnet, '20, became the bride 
of Mr. Harry W. Watts on the twenty-third 
of May. 

The first of August was the wedding day 
of Lillian Lafrey, '17, and Mr. Louis A. Scott. 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott will be at home at "Twin 
Oaks," Essex Fells, New Jersey. 

The wedding of Olive Chase, '19, and Mr. 
George W. Mayo took place on the twenty- 
eighth of June. Mr. and Mrs. Mayo will be 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



at home at 164 Pleasant St., Laconia, N. H., 
after the first of November. 

Mabel Flagler, '14, became the bride of Mr. 
Jasper E. Brownell on the twentieth of June. 

The engagement of Helen Johnson, '21, to 
Mr. John Clow, Jr., has been announced. 

The announcement of the marriage of Hil- 
dur Brekke and Mr. Amanuens Johan Aker- 
man has been received from Christiania, Nor- 
way. 

The wedding of Virginia Emmott, '22, and 
Mr. Andrew S. Orr took place on the e!ev- 
eth of October. Mr. and Mrs. Orr will be 
at home after the first of December at 12 
Chester St., Lowell, Mass. 

Mary Catherine Eshleman and Dr. George 
J. Willauer were united in marriage on the 
first of September. 

The wedding day of Helen Stephan, '17, 
was the thirtieth of June, when she became 
the bride of Mr. John B. Sterley. 

Marjorie Kunkel, '18, became the bride of 
Mr. Harry K. Brown on the twenty-fourth of 
June. After the first of September Mr. and 
Mrs. Brown will be at home at 326 South 
Oak St., Bluffton, Indiana. 

Maura McCarthy (1922) chose the twenty- 
fourth of October as her wedding day, when 
she became the bride of Dr. John F. Murray. 

Elise Parkinson (1921-2) was married on 
the sixteenth of October to Mr. Edward G. 
Miles at Daytona, Florida. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miles will be at home at the Commodore 
Apartments, Asheville, North Carolina. 

Old girls, especially those of Carpenter, will 
be interested to know that Helen Joy became 
the bride of Mr. Arthur V. Tornrose on the 
thirteenth of June. 

One of our former teachers, Marion Dooley, 
took the fourth of September for her wedding 
day, when she became Mrs. Thomas J. Crosby. 

Cupid has had a very busy year, according 
to the following reports: 

The engagement announcement of Matilda 
Foster to Mr. Edmund J. MacDonald has 
been received. 

The sixth of October was the wedding day 
of Alice Conklin Bevin (T3-T4), when she 



became the bride of Mr. Georges J. Leewitz 
at E. Hampton, Conn. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Viola Sullivan, '21, to Mr. Dennis E. Sulli- 
van, Jr., is received. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Eunice Perkins to Mr. Herbert E. Hill is re- 
ceived. 

The engagement of Dorothy Higginson to 
Mr. Leslie Delatush is announced. 

Evelyn Schmidt, '14, president of the Alum- 
nae Association, is back from Labrador. In 
the vernacular of the present Lasell girls, she 
was "thrilled" with her summer's experience 
serving Dr. Grenfell's mission. She has al- 
ready promised Miss Witherbee, who we are 
delighted to report is back again at Lasell, 
to contribute an article for the Leaves. 

Ruth Hopkins, '23, writes from Maine : "The 
Commencement number of the Leaves came 
to me this summer. I am beginning to realize 
how much old Lasell girls must value each 
and every copy of the Leaves. The Aroos- 
took Lasell Club had a very pleasant annual 
meeting in July at the country home of Alice 
Kimball, '98, in Presque Isle. Mademoiselle 
LeRoyer was the life of the party. I think 
she likes our great farming country." Hope 
Bean, one of our new girls, was entertained 
at this meeting. Ruth adds : "I hope you will 
like her and I hope she will love Lasell as 
much as I do. Sister Mary and I called on 
Maxine Perry Hall, '22, recently and found 
her in a cozy little home and very happy. I 
see Agnes Bishop often." 

Cora Cornell sent a beautiful picture of the 
Neues Rathaus at Leipzig to our Preceptress 
and word that she has begun her studies in 
Germany, having first visited many of the 
cities before settling down, but that she is 
already looking forward to her return to La- 
sell next year. 

We were pained to learn this fall that our 
Helen Reardon, '23, has been a sufferer this 
summer from infantile paralysis. We are 
sure that her classmates who have not already 
learned of her illness will be quick to send a 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



line of cheer to our dear Helen who, we are 
thankful to say, is on the mend. 

Betty Manville Curtiss, '20, sent one of the 
most heartening and delightful letters received 
at Lasell this fall. She has sent hack a rep- 
resentative this year in the person of her cou- 
sin, Harriet Harvey, of Woodbury, Conn. By 
the way, Betty, she is a fine addition to our 
school roster. Betty sent many good wishes 
for Lasell for the coming year. 

Josephine Curry, '23, certainly did send a 
delightful message to our Preceptress which 
she has shared with us and, what was more, 
she carried out her promise to be with us for 
opening days. She and that dear Betty Bris- 
tow, '23, did much to hearten and make wel- 
come the new girls. 

Indeed, there were a goodly number of the 
members of '23 who served as well to launch 
the school ship this year. Louise Woolley 
made a real visit and was most helpful and 
we appreciated her presence. Antoinette Mer- 
ritt, Adrienne Smith, Norma Prentis, Claire 
Parker, and Carolyn Colton all brought their 
good wishes in person and extended the glad 
hand of welcome to the new girls. 

A happy surprise during one of the open- 
ing evenings was a rush call from Phyllis 
Rowe, '19, and Norma MacMillan. They 
were bubbling over with good wishes and 
good news. The Preceptress declares it was 
a distinct joy to her, to Miss Witherbee, and 
the "old guard" to meet these loyal "girls." 

A band of little children have come recently 
to gladden the homes of our Lasell girls. 
Among the favored parents are : 

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence G. Sherman (Eliz- 
abeth Hildreth, '15), to whom a son, Laurence 
Fales Sherman, was born on September 21st. 

Mr. and Mrs. Justin L. Smith (Octavia 
Hickox, '18), to whom a daughter, Nancy 
Lewis Smith, was born on July 30th. 

Lieut. Commander and Mrs. Richard S. 
Robertson (Julia Russell, '21), to whom a 
son, Richard Swearingen Robertson, Jr., was 
born on August 10th. 

Mr, and Mrs. Floyd L. Carlisle (Edna Rog- 



ers, '05), to whom a daughter, Catharine Car- 
lisle, was born on August 30th. 

Mr. and Mrs. Preston A. Childers (Lucille 
Scott, '14), to whom a son, Preston Arthur 
Childers, Jr., was born on July 8th. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Henske (Kathryn 
McClanahan, '06), to whom a son, John Mc- 
Clanahan Henske, was born June 3rd. 

Who should drop in during the closing days 
of vacation but Louise Paisley, '09 ! She in- 
sists it is fourteen years since she was gradu- 
ated, but we can hardly believe it and yet how 
much she has accomplished in these years. 
One of the most interesting things which she 
has done was the giving of her services to 
the work at Chateau Thierry. At present 
Louise is a private secretary for one of our 
popular authors. She has a splendid position 
and we are quite sure is making good or she 
would not so happily hold it. She has half 
promised to write some definite word concern- 
ing her experiences on that far-flung battle 
field in France and we would be delighted to 
publish her message. In a personal letter since 
her visit she writes : "I hope this will be the 
happiest year Lasell has ever known. While 
I was in Boston I had a delightful visit with 
Bess Robinson Breed and also a visit with 
Winifred Smith Chambers who is quite en- 
thusiastic over the New Haven Lasell Club." 
Louise promised to visit Lasell at the time of 
the mid-winter reunion and we certainly shall 
watch for her. 

Josephine Milliken Roth, '99, her husband, 
daughter, and stalwart son were the guests 
of the Seminary in the early fall. Josephine's 
daughter half promised to come back to us 
and we would be happy to receive her. Her 
son is now a student at Bowdoin College. He 
also promised to make Lasell one of his homes 
when in Boston. We hope all these good 
promises will be fulfilled. It was a delight to 
see Mrs. Roth and to meet her husband. 

Rachel Chambers returned to Lasell for the 
first time in thirteen years. She looked not a 
day older and yet what things she has accom- 
plished ! She is now the secretary of one of 
the most successful steel and iron concerns in 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



Pennsylvania. We feel proud of this little 
business woman. 

That was an honest and comforting confes- 
sion on the part of Marian Bliven, '21, when 
she wrote to Dr. Winslow : "Often during my 
first year at Lasell I read the homesick letters 
of the 'old girls' and thought they sounded 
extremely silly, but now I know what it means 
to experience the feeling that prompts the writ- 
ing of such letters. I am now secretary to 
the General Manager of the City Gas and 
Electrical Department at Norwich, Conn., and 
love my work. Also' I am in charge of the 
Service and Adjusting Department in the same 
concern. In this kind of work nothing is 
monotonous. Some of the types especially in- 
terest me and I have learned to love my little 
Italians, for they are so grateful for what you 
do for them." We trust Marian will forgive 
us, but we must report in toto what one of 
her business associates said to her : "Lasell 
not only turns out competent secretaries, but 
also perfect ladies, which is half of every girl's 
success." Marian closes her letter with the 
hope that her sister Kathryn will come to La- 
sell next year and we hope she will. 

Florence Swartwout Thomassen, '09, writes 
to Dr. Winslow : "It is with great pleasure — 
and relief — that I announce the fact that Lou- 
ise Paisley has accepted the secretaryship of 
the class of 1909." Florence adds, "As soon 
as I am settled in my new home in Maplewood, 
New Jersey, we expect to get together and 
formulate some plans for the next year for 
our class." Florence's new address is 26 
Ridgewood Terrace, Maplewood, New Jersey. 
All the old girls of her time take notice ! 

A charming letter came to our Preceptress 
this summer from Margaret C. Perley, '20, 
whose present address is 2705 Piedmont Ave., 
Berkeley, California. She writes : "I remem- 
ber when I called to say goodbye to you in 
May, you told me that Paradise would open 
up to me here and I have found it to be true ! 
Nature is certainly kind to this part of the 
world, and although I have not yet visited the 
southern part of the State, I can't expect to 
see anything more beautiful than the flowers 



and homes and hills I have already seen. We 
have bought a home in Berkeley, not far from 
the University, and Emma and her husband, 
Allan Dewar, are planning to have one of the 
sweet little flower-covered bungalows that are 
so typically Calif ornian, as near to us as pos- 
sible. I know how interested you will be to 
hear that Emma is a mother. Her little dau?h- 
ter, Jean Perley Dewar— isn't that a Scotch 
combination for you? — was born in Berkeley 
last month, and we are all very happy in Em- 
ma's happiness. At first, realizing that New 
England is never to be our home again, we 
were all terribly homesick, but that has passed 
and we have become used to the idea of Bos- 
ton being several thousand miles away, and 
are ready to accept San Francisco as a sub- 
stitute. However, you may be sure I am 
planning on visiting Lasell for '20's fifth re- 
union ! I look forward to my letters from 
Doris Brown Ranlett, '21. She and the 
Leaves are my Lasell 'newspapers'. And 
speaking of the Leaves, if it isn't too much 
trouble, would you give the office my new ad- 
dress ? I want to keep up my subscription, and 
also my alumnae dues, and I will appreciate it 
very much if you will have my address 
changed in the office. I wish it were five 
summers back, and I was excitedly preparing 
for my first year in Auburndale ; but as it is, 
it is rather interesting to be looking forward 
to my first year in California." Margaret 
closes with cordial greetings to the Lasell 
family. We certainly thank her for this kind 
letter. 

At last to our great delight Ida Mallory 
Lyon, '03, came back to Lasell bringing with 
her, her husband. They were the guests of 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow one day, and another 
day returned in time to pay their respects to 
Ida's "dear Miss Witherbee" and our Pre- 
ceptress, the latter declaring that Ida looks 
hardly a whit older than when she was here 
twenty years ago, and certainly her fine en- 
thusiasm remains the same. She is the mother 
of three charming children and is one of the 
best and most representative of Lasell's "old 



girls. 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



Barbara Smith, '22, continues to send her 
friendly picture cards to Lasell, the last one 
announcing that, after a happy summer in 
Italy, she will return to America this fall. 

Our Maria Orozco is now at home in her 
dear Mexico, the guest of her grandfather. 
We have received one friendly word from her 
and hope to keep in constant touch through her 
mother, Senora Orozco. Our best wishes fol- 
low Maria back to her southern home. 

Florence Gifford, '23, writes that she is 
driving to California for the winter and ex- 
pects to have a wonderful time, but hopes to 
return to Lasell in time for Commencement in 
1924. 

We were grieved to learn of the passing 
away suddenly in September of the father of 
our dear Julia, '20, and Gladys Rankin. 

We were also saddened to receive the notice 
of the death of Rosa Heywood Brown of the 
class of 1854. Through the courtesy of Mrs. 
Ella R. Cushing we received the photograph 
which we are inserting. In the passing of this 




distinguished and beloved alumna Lasell lost 
at the time of her death its oldest graduate. 
Mrs. Brown was in her 89th year and was 
still en rapport with our school, and greatly 
beloved by the older members of the Alumnae 
Association. Lasell's sympathy is extended 
to their bereaved families and friends. 

Lasell is grieved to learn of the bereavement 
of our trustee, Susan Tiffany, '15, who has 
recently lost her father. Our tender sym- 
pathy is extended to this former student and 
her mother in their bereavement. 

Our Preceptress was one of the favored 
guests of Marjorie Gifford Grimm's, '23, wed- 
ding in June and has no end of enthusiastic 
comments to make concerning that delightful 
occasion. Miss Potter tells us Marjorie never 
looked as beautiful as on that perfect June 
day. One of the unique features of the wed- 
ding was the fact that the guests all were 
carried to the festive ceremony in boats, as 
the marriage was solemnized at the Lake Hop- 
atcong Yacht Club, situated on an island. For 
days Llarvard, Lasell and West Point stu- 
dents as well as other friends had been trans- 
forming the interior of the club house into a 
beautiful chapel, the altar of which was made, 
of mountain laurel. After the wedding jour- 
ney Mr. and Mrs. Grimm will be at home in 
East Orange, New Jersey. 

Annie Merrill David, '12, wrote from Enos- 
burgh Falls, Vermont, a most cordial and 
friendly letter and calls our special attention 
to Evelyn Ladd, who is one of our new 
students this fall. Annie, her husband, and 
family spent the month of August with her 
parents. She tells us that Mildred Hall Leber, 
'12, and her husband were in Vermont for 
the summer and that they had frequent meet- 



ings. 



ROSA HEYWOOD BROWN, '54 



Dear Lena Vee Kelley Stone's, '14, sister 
is among our most charming new girls ; also 
Dorothy, the sister of Gertrude Schumaker, 
'22, is already winning a warm place in our 
hearts. 

Among the new girls whose mothers were 
old Lasell girls are Juliet Warren, Elizabeth 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



Saxton, and Elizabeth Wells, who attends the 
Junior school. 

Miss Ransom came as the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wagner in the early summer and to 
Lasell's delight remained over into October. 
She has now returned to her winter home in 
Pasadena to be with her sister and brother-in- 
law, Dr. and Mrs. Bragdon. 

During the summer Elizabeth Hazelet Weis 
and her husband were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Wagner, also Miss Dorothy Shank, our 
former instructor in Domestic Science, was 
again at "home" with the Wagners. Miss 
Shank returned to Columbia University to fin- 
ish her course and is, also, assistant instructor 
in chemistry, her chosen subject. Dear Dean 
Margaret Rand of Hiram College and her 
mother were at the Seminary this summer and 
Miss Rand has lost not one whit of her splen- 
did enthusiasm for school work. 

Miss Nellie Warner and Alma Sweet, '16, 
called at Lasell during the summer. Both 
seemed to be unusually well and happy. 

Among the new members of our faculty La- 
sell welcomes Mr. Walter R. Amesbury — a 
graduate of Boston University — in the Sec- 
retarial Department, Miss Mary Roline Stew- 
art — a graduate of the Massachusetts Normal 
Art School — in the Art Department, Miss 
Famie Johnson — an alumna of Simmons Col- 
lege — in the Home Economics Department, 
Miss Essie Harrison as the new swimming in- 
structor, Miss Signe Nyberg as one of our 
nurses, Miss Lora Francois — a graduate of 
the Leland Powers School of the Spoken 
Word — in the Elocution Department, and 
Miss Edith Lawrence — a Boston University 
graduate — in the History Department. 

Lasell is very sorry to lose Adrienne Smith, 
'23, from the Secretarial Department. She, 
however, has received a very fine opening as 
private secretary in one of the prominent Bos- 
ton firms and we wish her all success in her 
new field of service. 

His Lasell friends will be interested to know 
that Mr. Carroll Towne, son of Associate 
Principal and Mrs. Towne, has been called, 
since his graduation from Amherst, to a fine 



position in Florida. He is now at Oneco, 
Florida, with Reasoner Brothers, landscape 
gardeners. 

That was a joyous journey of one thousand 
miles made by our Preceptress this summer as 
the guests of dear Alfhild Trondsen and her 
parents. The line of travel took them across 
the Mohawk Trail direct to Freida's charming 
home in Schuylerville, New York, and from 
there they visited the beautiful lake regions 
of George, Placid, Scroon, and Saranac. The 
journey also included the glorious passes of 
the Adirondacks, White and Green Mountains 
and a never-to-be-forgotten day touring the 
islands of Lake Champlain, visiting Ausable 
Chasm and coming home by way of Crawford 
Notch. Miss Potter declares the company and 
weather were perfect. Our one regret is that 
our Preceptress did not bring Alfhild back 
with her to stay, for we miss the dear girl 
from our student roster this year. 

Margaret Home has been to Europe only 
three times since her graduation in 1922. She 
was here for a short visit and has enrolled for 
training in one of the fine Boston kindergar- 
ten schools. We were glad to see her and 
wish her all success in her new school. 

Harriette Case, '22, and Dorothy Merwin, 
'23, were here in time for the "New-Old Girl 
Dance" and they were planning to do a little 
intensive school work in the winter. 

A friendly note was recently received by 
our Preceptress from Gladys Lucas, '21. She 
writes from her home in Johnstown, New 
York, and speaks of the joy they are having 
because her sisters, Louise and Edna, were 
both home with their little children. We, too, 
would have liked to look in on this happy fam- 
ily party and thank Gladys for her friendly 

letter. 

Edna Lockwood Ellison and Rose Taylor, 
with Edna's little three-year-old Viola and a 
young girl, a mutual friend of the two Lasell 
girls, all visited us in the opening month of 
the year. It had been some twenty-one years 
since the girls were at Lasell, but their inter- 
ests were just as keen and their merry visit 
with Miss Witherbee indicated that she re- 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



membered them and some of the lively inci- 
dents of their school days very vividly. Seldom 
have we seen a more charming and dear little 
child than Edna's youngest. We hope some 
day she, too, will be a Lasell girl. 

Miss Austin received a newsy note recently 
from Myrtle Brix Buehner, '15, of Portland, 
Oregon. She gives her changed address 
as 1495 Hawthorne Ave., Portland, Ore- 
gon. She sends special messages to Dr. 
and Mrs. Winslow, Mile. LeRoyer, and Miss 
Potter and also enclosed two dear snap shots 
of her children, Philip Buehner II, aged six 
years, and little three-year-old Patricia Anne. 

Dear Emma Smith, it comforts us a little 
to know that you are homesick for Lasell. 
We certainly miss you tremendously, but feel 
with you that your duty lies in your home. 
Thank you for sending to us a good represen- 
tative from White Plains in the person of 
Merle Johnston. 

Anna Marbold Wernsing did a loyal bit 
when she sent at the same time her subscrip- 
tion for the Lasell Leaves, and an order for 
a $6.00 Year Book, and bought a beautiful 
Lasell pin — a very practical way of showing 
her continued interest in her school home of 
forty-three years ago. 

On Oct. 1st Mrs. Wagner gave a luncheon 
for her sister, Miss Ransom, and this pleasant 
occasion called together some of the old La- 
sell friends. Among the company were Lucy 
E. Curtis, '80, Martha Hazelet Crooks, '10, 
Barbara Vail Bosworth, '05, and Miss Potter, 
'80. 

It seems strange and not quite in order to 
be keeping school without our Professor Hills. 
In April he began his fiftieth year as instruc- 
tor in the Department of Music at Lasell Sem- 
inary and we had earnestly hoped that he 
would be with us to finish out this half cen- 
tury of splendid service. However, we shall 
hold him in constant remembrance and our 
best wishes follow him as he enjoys the de- 
served rest with his family. 

Mr. George S. Dunham has been visited 
with, we believe, the first serious illness of 
his life this summer. However, we are re- 



porting him convalescing and very soon he 
will be able to resume his duties in the De- 
partment of Music. 

Berenice Farber, '23, promised to make us 
a real visit this fall, but was only able to 
"dash in and out". We hope that some time 
during the year she will return and make that 
"real visit". 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Marian Beach, '16, to Mr. Herbert Wood- 
ward Barlow has been received. 

Over a dozen years ago Madeline Cobb Hart 
left Lasell. We were glad to welcome her for 
a short call recently. She keeps up her loyal 
interest in the school and gives us a good re- 
port of her sister and her family. We could 
not see that Madeline had grown older and 
she had an interesting story to tell us of her 
8-year-old daughter, of her travels abroad, 
and promised to be more neighborly in the 
future. 

Florence Day Wentworth, '22, the bride, 
sends a message to Lasell telling us that this 
winter she and her husband will be at home 
at 401 Water Street, Exeter, New Hamp- 
shire. With the letter came a fine "write up" 
of Florence's beautiful wedding. We wish we 
had space to insert it. 

Last August Mrs. C. D. Kiger (Blanche 
Richmond, '09) called, bringing with her her 
husband, a graduate of the Harvard Law 
School, and her dear little daughter of eight. 
Sorry we were not all at home to receive them. 

Our Miss Witherbee keeps in touch with 
Christine Ryrie of Toronto, Canada, and 
through her courtesy we have enjoyed a 
charming letter from our dear "Happy" of 
fifteen years ago. She and her family spent 
last winter in Florida and writes while in St. 
Petersburg, "I met a very sweet Lasell girl, 
class of '20, Helen Bass. It was a great pleas- 
ure to talk Lasell over together. I keep in 
touch through letters with Charlotte Ryder, 
Sophie May, Annie Crowe Collum, Anna 
White Drake and Florence Swartwout Thom- 
assen. During the war I spent three years 
serving in military hospitals in Canada. 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Although I lost many friends this opportunity 
for service I appreciated." 

Christine has also had an extensive trip 
through the West and tells us as every one else 
does of the glories of the Canadian Rockies. 
In this dear personal note Christine writes to 
our English teacher, "I still love hot chocolate, 
but never have I made or been served with any 
comparable with that which you slipped across 
the hall to me all those years ago." 

We received a call from Ruth Hayden, '20, 
recently, who is back in Boston as Miss Par- 
ker's assistant in music, and a card from her 
sister Maude, '16, at present visiting Rose 
Hcefflin in Dubuque, Iowa. 

Lasell has not been honored by having a 
call from European royalty directly, but re- 
cently Eva-May Mortimer received a call from 
the third cousin of the present king of Swe- 
den. 

Our dear treasurer, Ella Richardson Cush- 
ing, is tarrying later than usual in New Eng- 
land. We regret that she has been on the sick 
list this summer, but she is fast convalescing 
and hopes to visit Lasell before her return to 
Miami, Florida. 

What a joy always to have the old girls re- 
turn, and especially such a large delegation 
from '23 as made us a call recently : Louise 
Puckett, Jeanette Merrick, Elizabeth Neal, 
Anna Bullock, and Dorothy Chase. Also Eu- 
genia Swift, Helen Johnson, Sarah Crane, Isa- 
bella Whitcomb, Dorothea Droege, Helen T. 
Cook, and Priscilla Osborn made us twice glad 
by looking in and paying their loyal respects 
to the old school. Louise is specializing in 
Expression in Boston at the Leland Powers 
school; Jeanette Merrick is a real teacher of 
Domestic Science in one of the New Jersey 
schools ; and Helen Johnson is a business 
woman, but later will confine herself exclu- 
sively to a class of one in Domestic Science. 
We rejoice in her happiness. 

One of the summer numbers of a Boston 
daily contained a new adventure in the Book 
Store Department. Mr. Richard Fuller, hus- 
band of our Mildred Peirce Fuller, '06, and 
head of the old historic Corner Book Store in 



Boston, has started a chain of book stores be- 
tween the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, his ob- 
ject being to train the American public in more 
intelligent and generous purchase of books. 
Mr. Fuller is congratulated by many for his 
novel plan, which seems to appeal to the gen- 
eral public, certainly among thoughtful people. 
He is at present president of the Bookman's 
Club of Boston and in his chosen profession 
Boston's most "live wire". 

Dr. Winslow is in receipt of a recent letter 
from Edith McClure Patterson, '02, who is 
now Budget Specialist for the General Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs. She reports an ac- 
tive and enjoyable experience at the great edu- 
cational meeting last summer in San Fran- 
cisco. She has recently sent out a letter en- 
titled, "The Beginning and Growth of the 
Home Budget Idea." It is full of fine hints 
concerning the need of careful training among 
young women, especially in the private schools 
and those who are away from the helpful in- 
fluence of club life. We wish her success in 
her new departure. 

Roma Weymouth, '20, is now a student at 
the Gordon Bible College in Boston and also 
has time for some modest business venture. 
Her cousin, Sybil, is working successfully in 
the Chamber of Commerce. 

One day during the summer Agnes Wylie 
West, '05, and her family paid their respects 
to Lasell, and our Preceptress is still regretting 
that she chanced to be away on that day. 

Ruth H. Ordway, who graduated with hon- 
ors last year from the New School of Design, 
is now taking an advanced course in art at 
the Normal Art School. 

Julia Potter Schmidt, '06, and her husband 
were guests of Lasell this summer. They came 
East to celebrate the reunion of Mr. Schmidt's 
M. I. T. fraternity. 

Our Miss Tuttle was kind enough to tarry 
for a day in our midst. We wished we could 
have kept her "for good." She has started 
South and will spend her winter again in Flor- 
ida. Our best wishes always follow this be- 
loved teacher. 



r 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



While passing along one of the Rhode Isl- 
and highways in late summer our Preceptress 
had a chance meeting with Mildred Smith 
Leach, '14, her husband, and dear little boy. 
Mildred was spending the summer near her 
parents' home and looked the picture of health 
and happiness. We wish we could have seen 
more of this charming family group. 

In reply to the Personal Editor's request for 
a report of the Connecticut Valley Lasell Club, 
Miss Laura Comstock sent a kind word and 
also a photograph of the Comstock Memorial 
Chapel at Ivoryton, Connecticut. A beautiful 
and permanent benefit for the citizens of the 
charming town. 

The old Lasell girls, especially "her girls," 
will be interested to learn that our former 
teacher, Nell Woodward, '15, was married on 
the eighth of October to Mr. Harry Bumstead 
Collins. The wedding was celebrated at Den- 
ver, Colorado, Nell's home city, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Collins are now at home at 121 Bancroft 
Avenue, Reading, Mass. 

The recent meeting of the New England W. 
F. M. S. was celebrated in the historic Trem- 
ont Street Church where this great society 
started. Among the Lasell delegates to this 
important meeting were : Marion Weidman, 
1919-20, Deborah Ingraham, '19, Bessie Legg 
Harris, 1897-8, Edith Brodbeck Kimball, 
1893-4, Jennie Dunn Carey, 1882-3, Mary 
Packard Cass, '89, Lillie R. Potter, '80, Clem- 
tina Butler, 1880, and Lillian Packard, '83. In 
connection with this the Leaves is glad to 
make mention of Miss Packard's devotional 
book for use in Missionary Societies, and the 
editor of one of our missionary papers has 
pronounced it the best book of its kind she 
has ever read. 

Helen W. Smith, '18, sent recently a beau- 
tiful letter to our literary editor which, as she 
herself says, contains the notice of a deep 
sorrow and also a great happiness which has 
recently come into her life. In September 
Helen lost her beloved father and in this let- 
ter she also announces her engagement to Mr. 
John Francis Stone of Port Washington, Long 
Island. Our tender sympathy is extended to 



Helen and her clear mother, and also we, too, 
rejoice with our former schoolmate in her 
new happiness. 

Marion Eaton, '20, just as beautiful as ever, 
dropped in at Lasell the other day chaperoned 
by a member of the Johns Hopkins Medical 
Staff. We were delighted to' meet and greet 
Marion and her friend. 

Mary Phipps, '21, is certainly "making 
good." A recent Norfolk daily contains a pic- 
ture of Mary, who is now the Secretary of 
the Department of Employment and Room 
Registration at the Y. W. C. A. of Norfolk. 
The paper passed a fine compliment to the 
institution which trained her, but unfortu- 
nately had us down as "Laselle University of 
Baltimore." Mary's former training in social 
work forms a unique background for the 
problems of this new employment bureau, 
where she meets all kinds of girls and tries to 
find out not only for what they are fitted, but 
what they would like to do. We rejoice in 
her forward movement. 

One of the lecture periods this month was 
given to Mrs. Alice Peloubet Norton, a former 
instructor at Lasell, and the daughter of our 
beloved Dr. and Mrs. Peloubet. Mrs. Nor- 
ton received experience as the head dietitian 
in the Women's College at Constantinople, 
Turkey, and she delighted our girls with an 
unusual and valuable message concerning the 
Turkey of today. 

Recently a letter was received by our Pre- 
ceptress from Miss Rose Morgenthaler bear- 
ing cordial greetings to Lasell from Miss Rose 
and the doctor. They are planning to spend 
the winter either in New York or Florida and 
will give us their permanent address later. 
Miss Rose had recent good news from Miss 
Tuttle and tells us that Eva Chandler will 
spend the winter in New Orleans, where she 
can make herself even more familiar than at 
present, with the French language. Our best 
wishes follow these sisters. 

Years of separation and the fact that our 
Principal Emeritus is far across the continent 
does not interrupt Dr. Bragdon's active inter- 
est in and service for his Lasell. Scarcely a 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



number of the Leaves is published which does 
not contain some interesting communication 
direct from our Dr. Bragdon. In his Octo- 
ber letter he writes : "The enclosed is from 
one of the extra fine women of whom Lasell 
sends out so many! Bless them!" The mes- 
sage is from Bertha Harris Armington (1881- 
83) who encloses a catalog of the 44th Annual 
Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture of the 
Providence Art Club What interests us most 
of all is the fact that one of Bertha Arming- 
ton's paintings is in that exhibit. The artist 
writes to her Principal Emeritus : "You and 
the life at Lasell are in my thoughts many 
times and it is a precious remembrance. Some 
day I hope to go again to the 'Land of Sun- 
shine,' for my husband and I used to talk of 
making California our permanent home. Do 
you see much of Laura Place Gadsden (1882- 
83) ? She is now across the water, I believe, 
and Clarence writes me that Priscilla is soon 
to be married. Elizabeth Eddy Holden, '88, 
of New Bedford and her family have been 
stopping at the same place where mother and 
I have been this summer. I think a very great 
deal of Mrs. Holden and then our life at La- 
sell has been another bond in common. Eliz- 
abeth's three daughters are very attractive 
girls, very capable and particularly dear in 
their manner of always doing nice things for 
others. I told Mrs. Holden that I was writ- 
ing to you and she asked me to send most 
cordial greetings to you. Kindly remember 
me to Mrs. Bragdon, Belle, John, and Miss 
Ransom and many tender grateful thoughts to 
you for all that you did for me in the Lasell 
days." 

From 517 Maiden Avenue, Seattle, Wash- 
ington, Clara Davis Lounsbury, '98, writes to 
Mrs. Bragdon: "I have thought of you both 
often since our short call and know if ever 
we come to California again we won't waste 
so much good time trying to find you. My 
husband regretted very much he didn't come 
in and I knew he would when I told him all 
about the beautiful art gallery of which I have 
thought many times since. The boat trip up 
was delightful, but must confess we felt a 



little seasick just before we reached San Fran- 
cisco. We enjoyed your State very much, but 
must say Puget Sound Country looked more 
than pretty on our return. Come this way 
some time, won't you?" 

Barbara Smith, '22, is back again from her 
very happy months of study in sunny Italy. 
She reports a delightful worthwhile visit and 
is sufficiently fascinated with Italy and Ital- 
ians to declare she would like later on to make 
it her permanent home. 

Gertrude Schumaker, '22, is pleasing us with 
her neighborliness. She came out recently to 
visit sister and spend the week-end at her old 
school home. She is now a full-fledged sopho- 
more at the School of Secretarial Science of 
Boston University. 

The front page of the Boston Sunday Her- 
ald of October 21 contained pictures of Wil- 
liam Henry Sisson and his bride, who was 
Norma C. MacMillan (1914-8). In another 
column we gave a hint of this coming event 
by the welcome call made by Norma and Phyl- 
lis early in the school year. Mr. Sisson is the 
son of former Mayor Harry D. Sisson of 
Pittsfield, is a graduate of the University of 
Pennsylvania, and at present in the employ of 
R. G. Dun & Co. Our best wishes follow this 
bride and groom. 

Just as our Leaves are about to go to press 
we are glad to report that our beloved treas- 
urer, Mrs. Ella R. Gushing, has almost wholly 
regained her good health and spent part of a 
day as the guest of Dr. Winslow and the 
school. During her visit her daughter and 
daughter-in-law joined her. She will soon 
start on her journey to Florida, and Lasell's 
very best wishes follow her. 

Old girls of recent times will be interested 
to read the announcement of the engagement 
of Elizabeth Ehrhart, the cousin of Mary Stu- 
art and Emily Ehrhart, to Mr. Forest David- 
son, the friend of many of our girls of recent 
years. 

Our principal has received the announce- 
ment of the engagement of Katherine Rice, 
'20, to Mr. Ferd M. Broock, together with a 
letter in which she writes : "I have finally set- 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



tied down after my world rovings and am 
going to a Commercial College here in De- 
troit. The typewriting which I studied while 
at Lasell has placed me in the advanced class. 
It is very interesting work, as also is the type 
of girls with whom I am associated. You will 
be interested in knowing that Carol received 
her Master's Degree in Zoology at Wellesley 
last June. She is teaching at the University 
of Wisconsin again this year." 

One of our new girls from Portland, Ore- 
gon, received a delightful word of commenda- 
tion from our former pupil, Josephine Haley 
Forney (1901-2). She tells us what we have 
already found out for ourselves that Agnes 
McMurray is an unusually fine girl and that 
her father is the head of the Union Pacific 
System. We enjoyed very much what she 
writes of herself: "I know you will be inter- 
ested in what I have been doing since I came 
to the Western country. For four years I 
have been connected with the Publicity De- 
partment of the Portland Chamber of Com- 
merce — two years as its manager, one year as 
the Editor of its official publication. Three 
months ago the Multnomah Hotel, the largest 
in the city, asked me to come to take charge 
of their Tourist and Information Department 
and to plan and issue their advertising book- 
lets, and here I am. I am tremendously inter- 
ested in Oregon and get a great 'kick' out of 
advertising its many good points to the world. 
Perhaps you will remember that I have a 
brother and sister-in-law, Lucile Lothrop 
Haley, here in Portland also." We greatly 
appreciate the loyal and unfailing interest of 
this "old girl" in her Alma Mater. 

In a recent letter received by Dr. Winslow 
from Ida Mallory Lyon, '03, she writes : "We 
enjoyed our visit with you and Mrs. Winslow 
and had a beautiful trip West (and North). 
I suppose you have been over the Mohawk 
Trail so know what a treat part of our trip 
was. At Rochester I found my sister-in-law 
greatly interested in Lasell. She has two 
girls, one thirteen, another twelve, and she 
may send them to Lasell in another year or 
so." Ida has very kindly been trying to com- 



plete our Register of Graduates and old girls, 
and among other names she mentions Helen 
Johnson (1903) married to a gentleman by the 
name of Richard Kelly, and living at 2403 N. 
Union Avenue, Tacoma, Washington. If 
any one can add more recent addresses of old 
girls we shall appreciate receiving them. 

Evelyn Ladd has been most favored by hav- 
ing a real visit from her mother, as were those 
of us who had the privilege of meeting Mrs. 
Ladd. 

I presume the Local Editor has written a 
full and fascinating account of the Seniors' 
Open House, but I want to add a personal 
testimony. Never have the houses seemed 
more attractive, and what a splendid group, 
Gardner, Carpenter, Hawthorne, and Clark! 
We think there was hardly a person at the 
school that failed (to use Alice Freeman 
Palmer's expression) to "eat her way" into 
the good graces of these very hospitable Sen- 
iors. Here's to the Class of 1924 and their 
cordial hostesses. 

Louise W. Morrell, '08, has announced her 
engagement to Mr. Peter Joseph Nestler. 

The engagement of Freda B. Griffin, '20, to 
Mr. Paul C. Leining has been announced. 

The engagement announcement of Doris 
Nelson (1923) to Mr. Gerald Tattersfield has 
been received. 

Edna Cathryn Christenson (1913-15) chose 
the eighteenth of October for her marriage to 
Mr. Ralph Monroe Beckwith. 

Helen Ward Moss, '18, was married to- Mr. 
James Van Blarcom Post on the tenth of 
November, at Glen Ridge, New Jersey. 

Doris Porter (1920) and Elizabeth Brene- 
man (1920) delighted us by a call at the 
school recently. 

During these days our hearts are turning 
with tender love and sympathy to our own 
Japanese Lasell girl who recently submitted 
this touching and telling word to her English 
teacher. We repeat it in Yukiko's own words : 
"The earthquake disaster in Japan fills my 
heart with great sorrow. About seventy per 
cent of the Capital, Tokyo, and the whole city 
of Yokohama were destroyed completely. 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



More than fifty thousand men lost their lives 
while about three millions became homeless. 
The further detailed news which I have re- 
ceived from Japan shows the occasion more 
disastrous than it was previously reported to 
be. I cannot read without tears the Japanese 
papers filled with most sorrowful news and 
pictures. There is no expression for my feel- 
ing of gratitude for the sympathy of all na- 
tions, especially the American, whose response, 
and I learned it here personally, was the quick- 
est and greatest. I keenly feel that the world 
is actually a world of human beings. I am 
sure that the Japanese people will never for- 
get the deep sympathy of the whole world, and 
at the same time they will not disappoint the 
expectations of the other nations in their great 
and difficult reconstructions." 

Yukiko Naka. 
The following old girls attended the annual 
meeting of the Corporation held at the Sem- 
inary : Irene Sauter Sanford, '06, Susan Tif- 
fany, '15, Lillian Packard, '83, Mosetta Staf- 
ford Vaughn, '86, and Lillie R. Potter, '80. 



LASELL CLUB NOTES 



THE CONNECTICUT VALLEY LASELL CLUB 
The Connecticut Valley Lasell girls chose 
one of the fairest of October days for their 
eighteenth annual meeting which was held at 
the Hartford Club Building on Saturday, Oc- 
tober 6. There were forty-four members pres- 
ent, which included the guests of honor, Dr. 
Winslow, Mademoiselle LeRoyer, and Miss 
Potter. 

Harriet Case, '22, and Dorothy Merwin, 
'23, met the delegation from Lasell and car- 
ried them quickly and comfortably to the 
club house, where Sarah Dyer Darling, 1900- 
01, president of the club, gave them a most 
cordial welcome. The entire company sat at 
one banquet table, which arrangement created 
a very cordial and informal feeling in this big 
happy family. Two beautiful baskets filled 
with gladiola and chrysanthemums added 
much to the decoration of the table. 



After a gracious welcome from the Presi- 
dent, the Secretary, and Treasurer, Cornelia 
Hemingway read her report and a motion was 
made that the Secretary's term of office be 
extended to two years, as it takes really more 
than one year for a girl to learn the "official 
ropes." This motion was carried. 

Dr. Winslow brought a most optimistic mes- 
sage from the school home. He spoke of the 
large enrolment this year and mentioned some 
of the strong teachers who have come to take 
the place of those retired, and also of the En- 
dowment Fund, which is steadily increasing. 

Mademoiselle LeRoyer chose this oppor- 
tunity to thank the Connecticut Valley 
girls for their very generous response 
to her appeal on behalf of her be- 
loved France, for they had given gen- 
erously not only of their money, but also 
donated clothing. She made reference to some 
of the new departures which are being worked 
out in the school, especially referring to the 
Dalton ; System which Mr. Towne has intro- 
duced successfully into the junior school, and 
some of the Seminary teachers are "trying it 
out" in their own class work. 

Miss Potter brought a "homey" message, 
telling many of the details which interest old 
girls and making special reference to the suc- 
cess of some of the former teachers and pu- 
pils and also referring to the generosity of the 
Lasell Missionary Society, coming to the aid 
of stricken Japan and other worthy causes. 

The meeting was one of the best ever held 
by the Connecticut Valley Lasell Association 
and the new officers elected for the coming 
year are: 

President, Cornelia M. Hemingway, '22. 

Vice-President, Harriette Case, '22. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Emma White 
Welles, 1890-3. 

Those attending the luncheon were: 
Dorothy Moore '22 
Susan H. Couch (1886-8) 
Leontine G. Thalheimer '18 
Marion Austin (1920-2) 
Mary E. G. Olmstead (1901-3) 
Clara McL. Rowley '02 
Grace Griswold '08 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



Elsie D. Hilliard (1904-5) 
Gladys G. Stirn 
Grace H. Stiles (1892-3) 
Lillian G. Grant '20 
Jessie Hayden (1882-5) 
Josephine Holbrook '22 
Dorothy Merwin, '23 
Harriet Case '22 
Elsie Bolles '04 
Christine Lalley '23 
Laura Comstock (1891-2) 
Bessie L. Comstock (1891-3) 
Marbelle H. Barby (1915) 
Sarah Hammond '16 
Iverna Birdsall '22 
Sarah D. Darling (1900-1) 
Myra Steward '08 
Helen C. Waters (1892-4) 
Elizabeth M. Curtis '20 
Fanny MacKenzie (1903-4) 
Edna Olson '07 
Mabel Dunning (1903-4) 
Josephine J. Plumsted '85 
Marion Pomeroy '18 
Emma W. Welles (1890-3) 
Gladys S. Winger (1919) 
Emily H. Barnett (1902-3) 
Bertha H. King (1888-90) 
Helen M. Cornell (1902-3) 
Edith A. Brace '19 
Cornelia Hemingway '22 
Helen M. Saunders '17 
Freda B. Griffin '20 
Marion G. Wolcott '16 
Ruth T. Britton (1890-1) 
Gertrude Reynolds (1888-90) 



EASTERN MAINE LASELL CLUB 

From the secretary of the Eastern Maine 
Lasell Club we are indebted for this report 
of their meeting held early in September : 

Thursday noon, September 6, at the Con- 
duskeag Canoe and Country Club, the annual 
luncheon of the Eastern Maine Lasell Club 
was held. The affair was arranged by Miss 
Charlotte Ryder of Bangor, president of the 
club, assisted by Misses Cole and Hook of 
Brewer. Mile. Jeanne LeRoyer of Auburn- 
dale, Mass., long a resident of the school, was 
the guest of honor. This popular and well 
loved teacher gave a brilliant and witty talk 
which was heard with pleasure by the gather- 
ing of former students. 



A dainty luncheon was served and the flow- 
ers, place cards and other decorations were in 
pale pink and yellow. 

Those in attendance were : The Misses 
Faustina Curtis, Elaine Bass, Ruth Dunning, 
Maud Murray, Florence Wyman, Edrie Ma- 
haney, Charlotte Ryder, Edna Starrett, Lydia 
Adams, Mrs. Leslie Cuter, Mrs. William Hil- 
ton, all of Bangor ; Miss Bernice Cole and 
Miss Ethel Hook of Brewer ; Mrs. Helen Gray 
Porter and Miss Esther Norcross of Old 
Town, Miss Barbara McClellan, Boston; and 
Mile. LeRoyer. 

For the year 1923-1924, Miss Charlotte Ry- 
der was re-elected president, Miss Bernice 
Cole, secretary, and Miss Ethel Hook, treas- 
urer. 



A Chemistry Quotation: 

"There was a little Freshman, 

And now he is no more, 
For what he thought was H 2 

Was H 2 SQ 4 ." 



DAINTY CAKES 

Your cookies, jumbles, drop and 
layer cakes will be delicious if you 
use RUMFORD, the wholesome 
Baking Powder. It imparts to 
cake and hot breads that delicacy 
of texture and flavor sought for by 
all good cooks. Make tomorrow's 
cake with 



RUMFORD 

The Wholesome 

BAKING POWDER 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



JOKES 

The School paper is a great invention; 

The school gets all the fame; 
The printer gets all the money; 
And the Staff gets all the blame. 



(Heard in 11.15 class) Teacher: "What 
does Q. E. D. at end of theorem stand for?" 
Wise Pupil : "Quit and eat dinner." 



Teacher (in 1.15 class) : "The pupils in the 
front seats are requested not to talk so loud 
hecause those in the back seats would like to 
sleep." 



(Some Chinese Signs.) 

(1) Barber Shop. Victims executed 
promptly. 

(2) Tailor Shop. Ladies have fits upstairs. 



'Why do freshmen resemble real estate?" 
'Because they are a vacant lot." 



M. G. "Got nothing to do?" 

E. L. "No." 

M. G. "Then let's go to the library." 



Father: "What did you do with the check 

I sent you?" 

Student: "Alma Mater took it all, Dad." 
Father : "And I told you to keep away from 

women." 



A violinist entered a little music shop in 
London. "I want an E string, please," he 
remarked to the man behind the counter. Pro- 
ducing a box the latter said, "Would you 
mind picking out one for yourself, sir? I 
'ardly know the e's from the she's." 



Listen ! I am a little Freshie 

Not so very tall ; 
Sometimes I work hard, 

Sometimes not at all. 
I get A's and A's 

But never a — D 
And why you uppers scorn us 

Is more than I can see. 



The old Cicero is ne'er covered with dust, 

But thumb-marked and dog-eared it stands, 
Though my brains grow weary they'll never 
rust 

With that stiff old book in my hands. 
Time was when the well-worn book was new 

And my courage was passing fair. 
For that was the time when my trust flour- 
ished, too. 

And I knew not what joys (?) waited there. 
It makes my spirit dull as lead : 

Though it never makes any noise ; 
When I toddle off at last to bed 

A nightmare of Latin annoys ; 
And, as I am dreaming, constructions wrong 

Leer at me as if to say — 
"Oh, the years are many — the years are long 

"And we hover o'er you for aye." 



Miss — : "I'm tempted to give you a ten- 
minute exam." 

Pupil: "Yield not to temptation, yielding is 

sin." 



Miss S. (Displaying Old Henry to Art 
Class). 

D. M. (innocently) : "Who is that?" 
Miss S.: "He isn't; he was." 



He : "Why do blushes creep over girls' 
faces?" 

She : "Because if they ran, they would kick 
up too much dust." 



He: "Do you think that you could learn to 
love me?" 

She : "I am afraid not." 

He : "Tis as I feared— too old to learn." 



Prof. : "How much does a six-pound shell 
weigh?" 

Fresh.: "I don't know." 

Prof. : "Well, what time does the twelve 
o'clock train leave?" 

Fresh.: "Twelve o'clock?" 

Prof. : "Then what is the weight of the six 
pound shell?" 

Fresh. : "Twelve pounds." 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Beg pardon," said the registrar as a wor- 
thy freshman was registering, "but what is 
your name?" 

"Name?" replied the worthy, "can't you see 
my signature?" 

"I can," replied the registrar, "and that's 
what aroused my curiosity." 



What can it all be about ? 
Why the rushing girls in doubt ? 
First one, then two or three 
All gathered in a bunch, I see. 
Some are happy, others sad. 
It's something white that makes them glad. 
A scream, a jump and I hear one say, 
"I got one," as she dances away. 
What is the cause of shout and wail ? 
Why, can't you guess ? Of course, it's the mail. 

Mildred Whyte, '25. 



Passing farmer to bewildered and prostrate 
horseback rider : "Have an accident ?" 
H. B. R. : "No, thanks ; I just had one." 



Unlucky motorist (having killed the lady's 
puppy) : "Madam, I will replace the animal." 

Indignant owner : "Sir, you flatter your- 
self." 



Co-ed : "What a pity it is that handsome 
men are always conceited." 

He : "Not always, little girl, I'm not." 



Teacher : "That's the third time you have 
looked on her paper." 

Pupil : "Yes, ma'am, she doesn't write very 
plainly." 



Announcer at the dance : "Next dance is 
entitled 'Dance of the Moths'." 

Voice in the rear : "What are they trying 
to do — turn this into a Moth-Bail ?" 



"Where did Moses' baby clothes come 
from ?" 

"Jordan Marsh." 



Friend wife to doctor: "My husband is 
troubled with a buzzing noise in his ears — 
what would you advise?" 

Doctor : "I'd advise him to go to the sea- 
shore for a month." 

Friend wife: "But he can't spare the time 
to go away." 

Doctor : "Then you go." 



Isaacstein, Sr. : "Abie, what for you go up 

the stairs two at a time?" 

Isaacstein, Jr. : "To save my shoes, papa." 
Isaacstein, Sr. : "That's right, my son; but 

look out you don't split your pants." 



(With apologies to Longfellow) 
By the shores of Cuticura, 

By the shining sunkist waters, 
Lived the Prophylactic chiclet, 

Danderine, old Helmar's daughter. 
She was loved by Instant Postum, 

Son of Piedmont and Victrola, 
Heir apparent to the Mazda 

Of the tribe of Coco Cola. 
Through the forests strolled the lovers, 

Woods untrod by Ford or Saxon, 
"Oh, my lovely little Beech-Nut," 

Were the burning words of Postum. 
No Pyrene can quench the fire, 

Tho' I know you're still a miss, 
For my Pepsodent desire, 

Is to marry Chiclet, Djer Kiss." 



Boy: "Oh, Mamma, look at that man with 
white trousers." 

Mother : "Those are his flannels, dear." 
Boy : "But, Mamma, Father's are red." 



An inexperienced traveller once tried to 
save money on a sleeping berth to Chicago, 
and in answer to his request to an agent for 
the lowest priced berth he was given the high- 
est, and received the information that the 
highest was always the lowest because it was 
highest, and that if he wanted to save money 
he should take the highest as it was lower than 
the lowest, which was highest. 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



Jordan Marsh Company 

Misses' Sports Apparel Shop 



Specializing in 



Sports Wear of Individuality 



Sports Shoes Sports Hose 

Sports Dresses Sports Hats 

Sports Accessories Sports Skirts 



Riding Habits Sweaters 

Knickers Tailored Blouses 

Topcoats Knitted Wear 



Absolutely Everything in Correct 
Sports Apparel 




BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 






Established 1780 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Now Showing 



Clever Styles 



in 



Slim Line Apparel 

Fashionable Blouses 

and 

Pretty Sweaters 

Clifford S. Cobb Company 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 

a x Brothers 

Ttowsrs 

(ftlfnu? Snaps, liolets an*. (©rrJjtiis 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 




CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 




SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Evening Slippers Orthopedic Shoes 

Ballet Slippers Walking Shoes 

Gymnasium Shoes Sports Shoes 

Suitable Hosiery 

A. H. HOWE & SONS 
WALK -OVER SHOPS 



170 Tremont St.— 378 Washington St. 
BOSTON 



2359 Washington St. 
ROXBURY 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



BANKING SERVICE 

The Newton Trust Company 
solicits checking and savings 
accounts from the faculty and 
students of Lasell Seminary. 

Our Aubumdale Office is 
located conveniently near the 
school and station, corner of 
Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

Newton Trust Company 


WE WANT TO BE 
OF SERVICE 

to you and to all of our customers. 
Do not hesitate to come to us if we 
can be of help to you. 

The 

Wellesley National Bank 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 


LEWANDOS 

Cleansing 
or Dyeing 

often saves 

Buying 

Cleaners Dyers Launderers 

BOSTON SHOPS 

17 Temple Place 284 Boy Is ton Street 

248 Huntington Avenue 

79 Summer Street 

29 State Street 

Brookline — 1310 Beacon Street 

Cambridge —1274 Massachusetts Avenue 

Watertown — 1 Galen Street (at works) 

Shops and deliveries in suburbs 

Telephone Service Back Bay 3900 

"YOU CAN RELY ON LEWANDOS" 


Dr. Briggs S. Palmer 

OPTOMETRIST 

149 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



T. O. Metcalf Company 



PRINTERS 



Designers fijSB)^ Tlnpravers 



152 Purchase Street Boston 

TELEPHONE CONGRESS 3820 



WILL C. EDDY, AUBURNDALE 




SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



PHOTOGRAPHER FOR LASELL 



Ye Craftsman Studio 



561 Boylston Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Tel. Back Bay 7040 



599 Massachusetts Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Tel. University 3642 



BURDITT & WILLIAMS CO. 
builders HARDWARE general 

Mechanics' Tools, Automobile Sundries, Electrical 
Appliances, Fine Cutlery 

160 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON 
Telephone Congress 6690 



PHONE CONGRESS 835 

RICHARD E. THIBAUT 

INCORPORATED 

PEERLESS WALL PAPERS 

Largest Wall Paper House in the World 

93 FEDERAL STREET 

Near Franklin Street 

BOSTON 



NEW YORK 
BROOKLYN 



BRONX 
NEWARK 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 



SAMUEL HOLMES J. FREDERICK HOLMES 

FRANK W. HOLMES 



SAMUEL HOLMES, INC. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



POULTRY AND GAME 



Stalls 10-12-14-16 and 17-19 Faneuil Hall Market 



Basement 3 South Side 



Boston, Mass. 



Tel. Richmond 708 - 709 - 35 13 



CARPET CONTRACTORS 




WE FURNISH AND LAY CARPETS 



F. A. BREWER CO. 



212 Summer St. 



Tel. Main 4669 



Meyer Jonas son & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 




Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




«v 




383 WASHINGTON ST 
BOSTON 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E. J. Monetise, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 



New York 



Ch 



icago 



QUALITY 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH, 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




~~— DUTCH 

-CHOCOLATE 

Wm - m, Flanders cg§ 

BOSTON DISTRiaUTSH 




Invalids 
and 
convales- 
cents 
thrive on 



,.,,,jjJfljl|IEBP ^ 



The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



Established 1 842 Capital paid in $90,000.00 Incorporated 1910 

Sands, Furber & Co., Inc. 

COMMISSION FRUITS 

MERCHANTS VEGETABLES 



6 & 17 North Side j Faneuil Hall Market, 



e. a. reed, Pres. BOSTON, MASS. 

F.W.RICE,Vice-Pres. 

C.H.CUMMINGS TELEPHONE 

Treas. & Gen'I Mgr. 1 552 RICHMOND 



LASELL LEAVES 



37 



DORACO 

QUALITY - GOODS 

THE BEST 

Arthur E. Dorr & Co., Inc. 

Six Large Markets 
We Ship Everywhere 



John J. Sullivan, Tieas. G. Francis Janes, Pres. 

John J. Foley, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Faneuil Hall Market 
Basement 1 1 % South Side Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON 

Telephone Richmond 40 



TELEPHONE RICHMOND} °^ 

NATHAN ROBBINS CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME 
BEEF, PORK AND LAMB 

33 and 35 Faneuil Hall Market 

33 North Market Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Telephone Richmond 1463 

Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 

Fruit and Produce 

69, 71 and 73 Clinton Street 

OSMON C. BAILEY, President BOSTON, MASS. 



38 



LASELL LEAVES 




THEODORE HAVILAND CHINA 

rHE illustration features one of our newest importations from this famous French pottery. 
The border is a soft golden yellow with richly colored flowers and center design of 
hrilliant-plumaged birds of Paradise 



530 
Atlantic Avenue 



Mitchell Woodbury Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



One Block from 
South Station 



V. A. PLUTA & CO. 

Meats and Provisions 

Fresh Vegetables in Season 



AUBURNDALE 
SQUARE 



Phone : 
West Newton 0229 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Child*, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 



57 and 58 N. Market St. 



Boston 



Geo. D. Emerson Co. 

WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 

Largest Distributors in New 
England of High Grade Fruits 
and Vegetables in number 
ten tins 



BOSTON, 



MASS. 



LASELL LEAVES 



39 



[7&47J 




I 1923 ] 



$10.00 ^ ,sB! ^sa 

An unusually Clever Design of the Sandal Type 

for street wear; in Gray, Log Cabin or 

Brown Nubuck or Black Russia Calf. 

Appropriate Hosiery 

T. E. MOSELEY CO. 

1 60 Tremont Street 



GIRLS 



Whenyouarethink- 
ing of buying dress 
shoes, walking 
shoes, sneakers, 
ballet or gymnasium 
shoes think of 



CONNELL & CAREY 

(Formerly with Thayer McNeil Co.) 

Shop 4, Second Floor, Little Building 
80 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Beach 1167 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons, Inc. 

Caracul Jacquettes 

$115 and Upwards 

FOX SCARFS 

NATURAL WHITE, SILVER, 

BLUE AND RED, ALSO 

DYED IN ALL THE 

PREVAILING 

SHADES 

364 Boylston Street Ariiristreet 

Established 1858 



E. A. DAVIS & CO. 

Women's Wear 
Students' Supplies 

Lasell Banners, Pennants and Pillows 
WELLESLEY, MASS. 



Goforiie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



40 



LASELL LEAVES 



ANDREWS CORNER 

TEMPLE PLACE and WASHINGTON STREET 

NOW IN STOCK 

Alligator Trimmed Brown and 
Grey Sport Oxfords 

SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


WALTHAM, MASS., 233 MOODY ST.. Tel. 047 l-W. 
MALDEN, MASS.. 147 PLEASANT ST., Tel. 0631-W. 
QUINCY. MASS., 3 GRANITE ST.. Tel. 0555-M. 
PAWTUCKET, R. I., 316 MAIN ST., Tel. 363-R. 

The 

Dorothy Benham 

Hat. 


Fine Hosiery, Beautiful Lingerie, 

Brassieres, Ties, Girdles, Gifts, Novelties, 

Pennants and Pillows 


WINTER is COMING 

Be Prepared. Get Your 

LOMBARD 
MACKINAW 

Warm, Soft, Thick Coatings, Rich Plaids 

Send for Illustrated Booklet of 

Lombard Middies, Skirts, Breeches 
Sweaters, Knickers, Etc. 

LOMBARD MIDDY BLOUSE CO. 

ROOMS 304-309 
665 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

Two Doors from Boylston St. 


Madame Whitney 

557 WASHINGTON ST., WELLE SLEY 


THE NOVELTY SHOP 

549 Washington Street 
Opp. Wellesley P. O. 

A Full Line of NOYES BROS., 

Gowns, Hosiery, Neckwear, 
Embroideries and Notions 

Novelties and Gifts of all Kinds 


Guaranteed Rubbers 
Fall and Winter Footwear 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 

The Auburndale Shoe Store 

PHILIP BERMAN, Proprietor 

295 Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 


Cotrell & Leonard 

Albany, N. Y. 

Caps 

Gowns 
Hoods 

for all degrees 


CURTIS & WELD 

Theatrical Costumers 

34 HAYWARD PLACE 
BOSTON 

Telephone Beach 4048 



LASELL LEAVES 



41 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 




iatgltelj 

1 60 Tremont Street 



Between West and Boyleton 
Streets 




MILLINERY 
DRESSES 
BLOUSES 

NOVELTIES 



SWEATERS 
CORSETS 

UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 



THE GRAY SHOP 

BEAUTY PARLOR 
2086 Commonwealth Ave. - - Auburndale 

Telephone W. N. 0980-R 



The Green Bough 
Tea Room 

597 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 

DAILY SERVICE FROM 12 TO 7.15 
SUNDAY SUPPER 5.30 TO 7.30 



Our 

Only Travelling Salesman 

"Mr. Postage Stamp" 



Nonantum Pad & Paper Co. 

NEWTONVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 
HluBtr BmitrB 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Hay market 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 



The 

Blue Dragon Tea House 

60 CENTRAL ST., WELLESLEY 

Week Days, 1 1 A. M. until 7.30 P. M. 
Sundays, 5.30 P. M. until 7.30 P. M. 

OVER-NIGHT GUESTS ENTERTAINED 



42 



LASELL LEAVES 



OUR TABLE BRAND 
COFFEE is quality coffee. 

It has been roasted and 
blended to produce a de- 
licious, appetizing flavor. 

WEBSTER-THOMAS 

Tea & Coffee Co., 

219 State Street, 

Boston, Mass. 


The National Memory and Fellowship Book 

Used at Lasell Seminary and at the Principal 
Colleges and Schools throughout the Country 

Published Exclusively by 

COLLEGE MEMORY BOOK CO. 

Chicago, 111. 


The Corner Tea Room 

Where you can get the famous 

Fudge Cake, Candies, 

Sandwiches, Ice Cream, etc. 

1 704 WASHINGTON STREET 


A FRIEND 


Johnson & Keyes Express Co. 

EDWARD F. SPENCER, Prop. 

FURNITURE AND PIANO 
MOVING 

436 Lexington Street 
Auburndale 


LASELL GIRLS 

IN THE | 

White Mountains 

FOR 

WINTER SPORTS 

February 15-18, 1924 
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL 

SETH C. BASSETT, Conductor 


Jolly's 

451-455 MOODY STREET, WALTHAM 

Manufacturers of High-Grade Candies, 

Chocolates, Bonbons, Caramels 

and Hard Candies 

SPECIAL FANCY BOXES AND BASKETS 
FOR HOLIDAY TRADE, $1 TO $5 

Ice Cream Sodas College Ices 

Telephone Connection 



LASELL LEAVES 



43 



Visit Our New Remodelled Store 

STUDENT'S SUPPLIES 

Fountain Pens, Ever-sharp Pencils, Loose-Leaf Devices 
High Grade Stationery 




57 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 
ENGRAVERS STATIONERS PRINTERS 



ATLANTIC PIPE AND SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

WROUGHT IRON AND STEEL PIPE 
Valves and Fittings for Steam, Gas and Water 

1 00 FRIEND STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



Printed Personal Stationery 



200 Single Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 
100 Double Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 

Printed with name and address 

Hammermill Bond, White, Blue or Gray 

Lasell Seminary Bookstore 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



$1.00 
1.00 



Try the Wonderful 

Day Dream Toilet Line 



at 



The Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



Compliments 

OLDS' FOOD SHOP 

2094 Commonwealth Avenue 
A uburndale, Mass. 




Art Supplies and Gifts 

DRAWING Supplies and 
Artists' Materials. Gifts 
and Greeting Cards in season. 
Parchment Lamp Shades and 
other decorations dear to the 
heart of the student miss. 

Spaulding-Moss Co. 

42 Franklin Street Just off Washington 

BOSTON 



The Green Gate Tea Shop 

LUNCHEON TEA DINNER 

SPECIAL PARTIES 

Birthday Cakes a Specialty 

Also Cinnamon Buns, Doughnuts, Etc. 

Tel. West Newton 0396 



Store Tel. West Newton 1271 



Greenhouses W. N. 0922 



Riggs The Florist 

Flowers for All Occasions 

2098 Commonwealth Avenue 

Auburndale, Mass. 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



44 



LASELL LEAVES 



W. E. TOMLINSON 

Bicycles and Repairing 

FLASH LIGHTS 
Motor Cycles, Auto Supplies 

1421-3 Washington St., West Newton, Mass. 

TELEPHONE 0169 


All Seasonable jFlmwra 

mag br ijafc at our 

(§ut ArtiatH arr ahuaga at gnur Bttmts 
(§ur prtrra art alutaga rraaonabt* 

3nv Seltery to HaaeU 

©rtora hg mail at telephone fill? a with, 
apmal rare 

ijuwgljtfln diortwg 

iFltmtrr Btyap 

Htttor f ark §>L aHmrrfj 

Soatott 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

C. F. EDDY CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 


E. B. DEACKS & CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

All kinds of Electric Wiring and Electric 
Utensils 


JOHN J. FORAN 

Builder, Contractor, Brick Mason 
and Plasterer 

Granolithic, Chimney, Fireplace and Tile 

RESIDENCE, 25 SHIRLEY STREET 
WEST NEWTON 65, MASS. 


Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 


Genuine Leather Writing Cases 

Black, Purple, Blue, Old Rose and Brown 
Moire Silk Lining 




$3.95 

Initials Engraved on Buckle Free 




Woodland Park Garage 

TRUMAN C. CROWNER, Prop. 

DORT - service - KISSELL 

1 76 1 Washington Street, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Telephone, West Newton 1 788 




Thorp ft Martin 

COMPANY 




66 


FRANKLIN STREET, BOST 


ON 



LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Ave. 161 Tremont St. 1311 Wdnnt St 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



PEARL NECKLACES 

(ARTIFICIAL) 

ARE JUST AS POPULAR AS EVER 



SPECIAL 

24 inch 

$5.00 

with 1 4k white 

gold clasp 




OTHERS 

$7.50, $10.00. 

$15.00, $20.00, 

$25.00, $35.00, 

$50.00, $75.00, 

$100.00 



"CHOKER" NECKLACES AT $5.00-$10.00-$15.00-$20.00 



NEW SPORT RINGS 

At a Most Popular Price 
$50.00 Each 






3 Diamond* 



1 Diamond 
2 Synthetic Sapphires 



2 Diamonds 
2 Genuine Sapphires 



The Diamonds are finest white color. The Mountings are 1 8k white gold. 

We suggest that you remount your old diamonds in one of these new settings. A small 
amount of money invested in this way will bring surprising results. 




loIesate-^Hetai. *. wjwm s* 

JEWELEIfcJlSr. 



F. F. DAVIDSON 



F. F. DAVIDSON. Jr. 



IlHlillBl 




Vol. XXXXIX 



No. 2 



DECEMBER, 1923 



LASELL LEAVES 



AN EXCLUSIVE MODEL— BY L MILLER 



-w< 



THE "NORWOOD" 

The "Norwood," a flat heel 
model in patent, black satin, 
black, log cabin or otter ooze 



AT $10.50 



The last word in footwear — demonstrating anew 
the leadership of Fifth Avenue's foremost designer 

Other I. Miller Shoes $8.50 to $16.50 

Exclusively at Hovey's in Boston. Street Floor 



$10.50 



C.&¥1bi)e$ Co. 



'&) 



Established i&§* 



Jane Tooher Sports Clothes 

7 1 1 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 



GYMNASIUM GARMENTS 
MADE TO MEASURE 



OFFICIAL OUTFITTER FOR 

LASELL SEMINARY 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Silhouette Shop 

IS ON AUBURN STREET 

Opposite the Station 

Lunches Dinners 

Afternoon Tea 



ICE CREAM CANDY SODA HOT CHOCOLATE 



CHAS. BAXTER, Prop. AuDUHldale Td. Newton 1 202-R 



TVMCffSSmi 



TRADE MARK 



"Sportsmen's Headquarters" 

Tremont at Washington at 

West St. Bromf ield St. 

BOSTON 

Sports Clothes and Equipment 
Make Ideal Christmas Gifts 

Sports Wear for Men and Women, suede leather Coats and Blouses, Sweaters, Scarfs, Gloves, Neck- 
wear, Sport Jewelry, Golf and Tennis Equipment, Snowshoes, Skis, Toboggans, Skates and Skat- 
ing Shoes, Guns and Fishing Tackle, Sports Footwear, Athletic Supplies, Home Games, Including 
Mah Jong, Bridge, Chess and Poker Sets, Leather Novelties, Cameras and Thermos Ware. 

Sportsmen's Headquarters is all that its name implies — 
Outfitter to Sportsmen, Sportswomen and Athletes in 
every field of sport, both the equipment and the clothing 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




LUX 

-for all fine fabric: 

Delicate, difficult colors — weaves that 
are chiffon thin — even your frailest 
things can be made to last if carefully 
laundered. 

LUX is so pure it will not injure any- 
thing that pure water alone will not 
harm. 

LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY 



DEPOSITORY 

for 

Individuals — Corporations 

and all 

Branches of the Government 



Assets over $6,300,000.00 



WALTHAM TRUST COMPANY 

Strongest Financial Institution in Waltham, Mass. 
23 Moody Street - 304 Moody Street 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



Fifth 

Floor 

Take 

Elevators 



Specialists 

in 

Silk 

Fabrics 



Thresher Brothers 

"THE SPECIALTY SILK STORE" 
Established 22 Years 

19 TEMPLE PLACE Through to 41 West St. 
THE ONLY "NATURAL DAYLIGHT" SILK STORE IN BOSTON 

Highest Quality — SILKS — 

SELL HERE FOR LESS THAN ELSEWHERE 

NOT FOR ONE DAY OR ONE WEEK, BUT MONTH AFTER 
MONTH AND YEAR AFTER YEAR— 

Because we are " Specialists in Silks " and the largest retail silk organization in the United States. 
We are located on the fourth floor, thereby eliminating the exorbitant street-floor rents, and do not 
deliver, but each patron desiring goods sent pays for her own delivery. 

There are numerous other reasons why you can purchase silks at THRESHER BROS, made by the 
leading American and European manufacturers at a saving of 15 to 30%. 

Also SILK and LINGERIE BLOUSES, PETTICOATS and KNICKERS 



REMEMBER if it is " Silk " or " Velvet " you will find it at Thresher's, and usually at 
lower prices than the same quality can be procured elsewhere. That none excel 
our assortments, however large in other lines. Samples given with pleasure. 



Philadelphia Store, 1322 Chestnut Street Cleveland Store, 1148 Euclid Avenue 

Baltimore Store, 17 W. Lexington Street 



Beattie & McGuire 



Famous for 



SILKS, DRESS GOODS, COATINGS, 



LINENS, LADIES* HOSIERY 



HANDKERCHIEFS 



Noted for Lower Prices and Better Values 



29 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 



"PURITY ICE" 

IS ONLY 

NEWTON DRINKING 
WATER FROZEN 

Clean, Pure and Economical 
Use it in your New Home 



Purity Ice Co., Inc. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

Telephone, Centre Newton 0069 

All that it's cracked up to be 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




More than 1 00 years in business 



Rooms as fresh as a new frock— 

Let linoleum strike the note in the less formal rooms of your home. 
It comes in such a variety of patterns ; it is so durable, so sanitary, so 
cheerful that it has become almost the standard floor for bedroom, 
bath, kitchen and sun-parlor. 

STAINES ENGLISH INLAID LINOLEUM 

unquestionably surpasses all others in beauty and wear. At PRAYS, 
the oldest Rug House in America, Staines stocks are most complete 
and surpass in economy, as may be easily proved by comparison. 

$1.65 to $2.65 the yard 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 



Have You Seen the Interior of Waltham's Up-to-Date Jewelry Store? 



S 
E 
R 
V 
I 

c 

E 




Q 

U 
A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



THE WALTHAM JEWELRY CO. 



427 MOODY STREET 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



&sell Leaves 

Vol. XXXXIX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., DECEMBER, 1923 No. 2 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 



LASELL LEAVES STAFF '23 AND *24 






Editor-in-Chief 


Business Manager 




JOCELYN TONG 

Assistant Literary Editor 


ELIZABETH FR1CK 




ESTHER PALMER 






Assistant Editor 

RUTH BUFFINGTON 

Joke Editors 


Local Editors 

ANNA HENDEE 

ELIZABETH NOWELL 




ELIZABETH ANDERSON 
MARIA PARRY 






Literary Editor 
DORIS WOODRUFF 


Athletic Editor 
EDITH HADLEY 




TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $2.00. 


Single Copies, 35 cents. 




Three Alumnae Numbers, $1.00 






CONTENTS 






LITERARY 










7 






8 
10 






11 

12 






14 






15 
15 






20 









6 



LA SELL LEAVES 



!„Hl 





072S^9 V9 



Specialist in Youthful Attire 

for the 
Miss Attending College 

Slim Tailleurs — in the new Autumn shades — richly fur 
trimmed Top Coats and Capes — of imported woolens — 
for general outdoor wear. 

Day frocks — simple and well tailored to conform with 
school-house demands. 

Tea arrd Party Frocks — that possess just the right 
French Atmosphere. 

Hats, Furs, Fur Coats and Accessories that will de- 
light the heart of any young girl — are gathered in the 
Manahan Misses' Salon. 



Qjumrwr Q)hof?s aL 



m 




mrnis 



MANAHAN BUILDING 

23o QjboylstorvtSbtdL 
(Boston, 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



^^. 




THAT "STILL," "SMALL" VOICE 

A victrola is certainly an amusing posses- 
sion, and serves our needs vastly more than 
we realize. Much evil treatment it gets at 
our hands: we wind it too tightly, let it run 
down mournfully, make it play whether or 
not it needs a rest, and refuse to give it a 
new needle even though it begs for one. Yet 
let it once be taken from us and our hearts 
are empty; we long for the voice that is 
silent. 

Music has strange powers. In the morn- 
ing when the jangling bell calls us from our 
dreams and we come reluctantly to the point 
of dragging ourselves from our warm beds, 
then our victrola comes gallantly to the rescue 
with its ever moaning saxophone and as we 
shiver into our clothes we listen, comforted. 

In the afternoon, when we wearily stagger 
into our rooms for a brief period of rest from 
our heavy class-work, and despondently cast 
ourselves down upon the bed, who but our 
friendly little victrola reminds us that while 
there is life there is hope. How can we dare 
to be dispirited or discouraged or blue when 
the victrola continues to lift up its voice in 
praise of the brazen god, Jazz! 

And yet, this same melodious source of 
frequent inspiration is also the cause of our 
downfall. Forgetting that its harmonies are 
not to be heard from four-thirty to five-thirty 
daily, we yield in an evil hour to a desire for 
music. Immediately comes the patter of foot- 
steps and the sound of Miss Wright's voice, 
"Girls, it's study hour!" 



Again, we find the victrola a thing of many 
moods. It always agrees with us, offering no 
argument. In this respect (dare we say so?) 
it is far superior to a room-mate. If blue 
hours come, the patient partner offers no ad- 
vice, only pours out for our healing, the kind 
of music most welcome in such a crisis ; 
whereas, our room-mate, under similar condi- 
tions, gives us a hasty kiss and departs amia- 
bly to the village with the comforting counsel, 
"Don't worry. Everything will be all right." 
After her departure what is left? Our vic- 
trola stays friend and counsellor. Once more 
it comes to the rescue, and leaning our souls 
upon it, we climb out of the slough of despond 
into the sunshine. 

Strange as it may seem, it has its saucy 
moods. It competes noisily and audaciously 
with its neighbors on second floor, loudly 
proclaiming its dominance. There is a fierce 
and open rivalry, too, between our victrola 
and its busy cousin in the next room. Curi- 
ously enough, its powers are such that as soon 
as ours begins its merrymaking, we forget 
entirely the other music-boxes bravely grind- 
ing away in other rooms. 

Stubbornness is another characteristic. Its 
spring breaks, and its refusal to run is pro- 
claimed by groans of an inhuman quality. In 
vain we whirl the record disc, wind the crea- 
ture, poke at the starting lever; our only re- 
ward is a wheezy cough. In despair, we pre- 
pare to descend bodily into the labyrinths of 
our little friend's motor, open the top and 
dive in, only to emerge with greasy hands and 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



a confused idea of the plan of wheels that 
run a victrola. Again we play the surgeon; 
we poke and pry, twisting our necks gro- 
tesquely to ascertain from what part the 
pathetic moan comes. We spy a bolt that 
looks as if it might be guiltily loose. Unable 
to reach it with our fingers, we resort to a 
button-hook, with which we confidently push 
and scrape until suddenly with a snap, the 
abused bolt drops off. Unfortunately, this is 
not the cause of the trouble. 

But now the trials and tribulations of the 
long suffering patient are broadcasted by ago- 
nized screechings. Not to be daunted we put 
the bolt back, defying its refusal to stay in 
place by tying it firmly with thread. Sud- 
denly an idea flashes upon us : perhaps it needs 
oil ; or is it some other sort of grease that 
such things need ? We call across the hall for 
advice ; the answer comes back, "Try cold 
cream or vaseline." The latter sounds logical 
enough, so we bravely dig into our new jar 
of vaseline. Generously we apply it under 
the chain, around the wheel, and into nooks 
and crannies that never before in our wildest 
moments had we imagined were there. Hav- 
ing administered all the vaseline the poor thing 
will hold, we determine to try once more. No 
steady whirr rewards us. Our stubborn vic- 
trola flatly, defiantly, and nastily refuses to 
run. Overcome with rage, we bang the top 
threateningly and announce that we will pun- 
ish it for its behaviour ; — ■ it shall not be 
touched for a whole day. 

The next morning we rise to a music-less 
day. Several times we long to try the lever, 
but with Spartan resolution keep ourselves 
scornfully away from the rebellious member 
of tbe family. On the second morning after 
our playmate's misbehaviour, we look long- 
ingly at it. Something in the mute stare of 
the closed doors begs for a second trial. We 
put on a record and touch the starter. It 
works ! "The sun comes out and the world 
is gay," proclaims the "still" ? "small" ? voice. 

Elisabeth Anderson. 



THANKSGIVING 

With whirling leaves and snapping frosts, 

A full white moon and golden sun, 

With starry nights and brilliant dawns, 

Thanksgiving season has begun. 

Roasted turkeys, nuts and pies, 

Games and chances, endless joy; 

Do you lightly through them frolic, 

Or do you seek the sweeter task 

To give and not to get, the livelong day, 

To help the more unfortunate ones, 

Along their stumbling way? 

M. Parry, '24. 



THIS MODERN YOUTH 

In these days of broader opportunities and 
activities for women, when community, na- 
tion, and world interests claim her, the cynic 
reflects discouragingly as to the results of 
these outside demands upon the home train- 
ing of our youth. He emphasizes the youth 
of pioneer days, their thrift, their power to 
assume responsibility, and he speaks discour- 
agingly of our pleasure-loving, restless, so- 
phisticated youth. 

In all likelihood, the conscientious parent 
does look back a little regretfully on those 
days of our sturdy, healthy civilization when 
the labor for the very maintenance of life, its 
necessities and its pleasures, was shared by 
all the family. 

We admit that we live in an age of mech- 
anism, with its attendant drawbacks, — "Even 
our daily bread, wrapped in waxed paper, 
drops like manna from the skies. We press 
electric buttons and passively await results ; 
and the more money Father earns and the 
more wisely Mother manages, the more but- 
tons may we press and await the results." Do 
we wonder that one of the great temptations 
of our youth is to possess rather than to 
create, to construct ? 

But throughout the generations the problem 
of home and school remains the same, — to pre- 
pare our youth for the game of life, the game 
of hard knocks, to train them to assume re- 
sponsibility, to seek out and meet their obliga- 
tions to develop a high social intelligence that 
they may become worthy citizens. 

We who live closest to youth disagree ab- 
solutely with the cynic. We know that every 



LASELL LEAVES 



age has its weaknesses, its follies, its vices, 
but these do not endure, — they are only the 
wreckage cast up, as it were, by the ebb and 
flow of the high ideals, the purposes, the ac- 
tivities of civilization. 

We who live closest to youth realize that 
in your very restlessness, your eagerness, your 
ready criticism, your love of romance, ad- 
venture, humor, lies the great hope of the 
present generation for doing progressive 
things. You will, in good time, realize that 
in these new values that are being created, 
you must learn to measure the worth of things 
in the amount you are called upon to pay 
for them. You will learn that there are deeper 
joys of heart and mind awaiting you than the 
pleasure of the moment, just as there are 
greater social evils than foolish dressing and 
excessive dancing. 

You will learn that there are pitiful want 
and ignorance in the world for you to help 
set right, squalid homes, starvation wages, 
child labor. In your own homes there prob- 
ably will be little children tugging at your 
skirts and looking deep into your eyes for 
the integrity which at times the world denies 
them. 

When in your journey along life's highway, 
doubts assail you and your faith grows dim, 
temptations urge you and the will is weak, 
when you falter between right and wrong, 
and you long for integrity, go back to your 
girlhood, to parent and teacher, and there you 
will find it in the very remonstrances, the 
restraints, the urging on here and holding back 
there, in the earnest, honest endeavor to do 
what was best for you, whom they loved and 
in whom they had great faith. 

So shall we square our shoulders, lift our 
heads high, and march breast forward, saying 
with that great optimist of youth and of old 
age, of every generation, — 

""How good is life, the mere living. 

How fit to employ all the heart and the soul 

and the senses 
Forever in Joy." E. E. F. 



OUR POINT OF VIEW 

When you wake up in the morning 

Full of pep and feeling fine, 
Do the teachers ever thank you 

When you get to school on time? 

When a movie comes to town, 

And you really want to go, 
Do the teachers say, "Why, certainly, — 

Don't miss that picture show"? 

When there is a college dance, 
And you feel you'd like to go, 

Do the teachers say, "Of course, 
Well, why not, I'd like to know?" 

If you think they'll ever do it, 
Give encouragement and smile, 

Then I'll whisper in your ear, "My child, 
Just you try it, once in a while !" 

Bobby Niday. 



If I had a wee little boy of my own, 

I'd sing him the song of the sea, 
And tell him the stories to me well known 

That the fairies have whispered to me. 

If I had a wee little boy so gay, 

Holding his firm little hand, 
I would lead him forth at the end o' day, 

Over the borders of fairyland. 

Oh, the stories of sailors, the stories of ships, 

That riding at anchor lay, 
Till the queer little crew the mooring slips, 

Then off — at the end o' the day. 

Off for a journey to dreamland far, 

Under a sunset sky, 
Then back again with the morning star, 

My wee little boy and I. 

Mary Roline Stuart. 



A Student Bold — may her tribe increase — - 
Awoke in chapel from a deep dream of peace, 
And saw before the students gathered there, 
Searching their faces with anxious care, 
A presence writing in a big black book. 
Rousing, the student her dreams forsook 
And to the vision in the room she said, 
"What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, 
And with the glance of one who deeply grieves, 
Answered, — "The names of those who take the 

Leaves." 
"And is mine one?" she asked. "Nay, not so," 
Replied the presence. The student spoke low 
And said, "Write me as one of the Little White 

Doves, 
Who will always be true to the school she loves." 
The vision wrote and vanished. The next night 
It came again and with mystic rite, 
Showed her the names of those who had paid. 
Lo! the student's name was there displayed. 




4 iff ox t& 




U 4C it 







31 J "^i.^ 



I was somewhat amused the other day to 
see several students, reputed to be intelligent, 
going to the trouble of sending twelve cents 
in stamps to a fortune teller who pretends 
to unroll the future by reading the signs of 
the Zodiac. They received in answer a printed 
slip of paper, probably one of two or three 
tons of similar slips containing weighty words 
of wisdom, which might apply to any one un- 
der the sun. 

Every one of us wishes to know what lies 
before us. But there is a much simpler way 
of finding out than by paying fakirs to what 
would vulgarly be called "hand out a good 
line." The immediate future is as plain as 
the nose on one's face. We know that we 
acquire those traits which we most practise. 
We would not dream of attempting to play 
the piano at one of the school recitals without 
ever having practised. But many of us try 
to pass an examination without the prepara- 
tion which only constant practice in concen- 
tration and earnest effort in our work can 
acquire. 

One way of knowing the future, in one re- 
spect at least, — is by practising continually 
those things which seem to us desirable in 
building up our character. The woman who 
has fully rounded out her equipment, feels 
no fear in facing the world : her ship of for- 
tune will surge over the crest of the wave ; and 
vice versa, the water-logged scow which drifts 
into her port of destination, if she arrives at 



all, presents yawning seams to the onslaughts 
of the storm of life. 

Do we, then, save our twelve cents and 
spend more generously a little common sense? 



"ORDER IN SCHOOL" 

"Girls, you must be quiet !" What a famil- 
iar phrase to the ears of every Lasell girl. 
You must be quiet in chapel ; you must be 
quiet in the library; you must be quiet in the 
hall because there are recitations going on all 
over the building. From three until four- 
thirty o'clock on Sunday afternoon is Quiet 
Hour ; from seven-thirty until nine-fifteen is 
Study Hour, and again we must be quiet. 

"When can we make a noise?" Isn't there 
plenty of time for noise after classes in the 
afternoon and before Study Hour in the even- 
ing? The rule of quiet is one to which we 
all can conform, and how much more orderly 
our school appears when each one bears her 
own responsibility in this regard. 

"Report to Monday morning Study Hall for 
being late to breakfast." This, too, is a famil- 
iar notice to some of us. Sometimes, upon 
finding such a note in her post-office box, a 
girl replies : "Oh, well, I should worry ! I'd 
just as soon go to Study Hall on Monday. 
I've loads of work to do." What a selfish 
attitude to take ! What a gain we could make 
if we would learn to be punctual at all times. 
Punctuality is one of the essential character- 
istics of a successful housekeeper, profes- 



LASELL LEAVES 



11 



sional or business woman, and are we not 
here to prepare ourselves for our after life? 

If we could remember to be quiet and "on 
time," surely we not only would be an aid 
to Student Council and the Faculty, but we 
would create a finer atmosphere through the 
school ; and we would be adding to our own 
sense of responsibility. 



The other day, in an English class, this 
sentence was assigned to us : "We learn to 
look upon our teachers, not merely as persons 
trying to pour knowledge into our youthful 
ears, but rather as friends who wish to join 
us in our good times." We were requested 
to put an appropriate adjective before youth- 
ful. Suggestions were immediately made, 
such as "deaf, heedless, hostile." Are not 
these suggestions too applicable to our atti- 
tude? 



Thanksgiving is supposed to be a time for 
us all to pause in our wild rush and to give 
thanks for all the blessings bestowed upon 
us. I am sure that many of us do appreciate 
most of our advantages, but how many are 
alive to the fact that one of our most invalu- 
able possessions is our opportunity to learn. 
Have we realized that our teachers are really 
our friends, that they seek to share their 
knowledge with us? Have we never mar- 
velled at the store of surprises, new thoughts 
and ideas, which are awaiting us in so many 
fields to which our teachers are our guides? 
If from no other point of view than the prac- 
tical one, appreciation of our advantages in 
securing a well-rounded education will be of 
greatest help both to our teachers and to our- 
selves. 



Our new library has transformed the "old 
chapel" and English Room into a world of 
books and tables piled high with Atlantic 
Monthlies, Literary Digests, and a myriad of 
other current magazines. The space wherein 
so many of us have babbled bad French into 
Mamselle's long suffering ears, now shelters 
Seniors deep in Wells' Outline, Sophomores 



copying themes before their next classes, and 
Juniors, — well, doing most anything. 

One of our reasons for enjoying our new 
sanctum is that of the little boy who loved 
sweet peppermints, "They makes me feel so 
nice and breezy." Yes, there are breathing 
space and elbow room in our new library and 
so many "old girls" have come back and en- 
thusiastically approved the change that we 
feel quite settled. 

There are the same, long, sunshiny windows, 
and on the opposite side, the shutters to peek 
through into the passage way, the hospitable, 
colonial fireplace and the favorite pictures. 

Do we hear a faint echo? . . . "Plus cela 
change, plus cela meme chose." 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

Marian Rogers of Watertown spent Octo- 
ber 28-30 at Woodland Park. 

Ghosts, goblins, skeletons and witches called 
at Woodland Park on Hallowe'en and took 
Mrs. McDonald away. A weird procession 
and we were all most surprised to find Mrs. 
McDonald safe back again. 

Miss Gladys Elderkin of Springfield was 
the guest of her sister on November 3rd, 4th 
and 5th. 

The Junior High School Group went to 
Boston on Sunday morning, November 4th, 
and attended service at the historic old North 
Church. 

Saturday, November 10th, was a perfect 
day for our annual trip to Marblehead and 
Salem. Through the quaint old streets of 
Marblehead — picnic lunch on the rocks — the 
Museum and House of Seven Gables in Salem 
- — all combine to make a full and happy day. 

Francis Robertson, Gwendolyn McDonald 
and Helen Jane Burke spent Saturday, No- 
vember 10, with Lona May Whitehead at her 
home in Wellesley. 

Mrs. H. King Conklin of Madison, New 
Jersey, spent Saturday and Sunday, Novem- 
ber 10 and 11, at Woodland Park, the guest 
of her daughter, Alice. 




Miss Phyllis Hessin has the honor of be- 
ing Missionary President with eight aides to 
co-operate with her. We prophesy she will 
be most successful. 

Congratulations to you — Jumpy Norris — 
our new Glee Club leader — may all kinds of 
success be yours ! 

The offices of Secretary and Librarian will 
be filled by Edith Palmer and Dorothy Pear- 
son. 

The Christian Endeavor Meeting of Octo- 
ber 12, under the leadership of Katherine 
Webb, was a most inspiring one. She told us 
how we were all captains of our own lives. 
Phyllis Hessin's singing added much to the 
impressiveness of the meeting. 

Our Vesper service Sunday evening, Octo- 
ber 14, was conducted by Mr. Brewer Eddy, 
who spoke with much feeling on the recent 
volcanic disaster in Japan. 

An unusually interesting talk on Turkey 
was given Monday, October 15, when Mrs. 
Alice Norton spoke to us of the schools in 
the Far East. She related many interesting 
incidents of the peculiar customs of their 
every-day life. The girls who have the op- 
portunity of education master many languages 
and are quite surprised that we are content 
to use but one. Though so widely separated 
from us and living under such different con- 
ditions, yet they have many interests in com- 
mon with us. 



One of our never-to-be-forgotten education- 
al and pleasure trips was the Salem one, taken 
October 22. The party left about nine o'clock 
in two huge Grey Line busses, going first to 
Cambridge, where we saw the famous Wash- 
ington Elm, so recently demolished, and the 
Campus and buildings of Harvard. 

Unlike many literary shrines, Salem still 
retains a quaint charm of former days, — the 
blue harbor, the wharves, the old fort, the 
large, roomy houses and surrounding gardens 
remind us of its famous seaport days when 
the word "Salem" on a fishing vessel indi- 
cated in foreign parts the name of a powerful 
country, and if "Mass." were attached, it 
likely represented a mere village of the re- 
nowned Salem. 

The Peabody Museum and Essex Institute 
contain many valuable original documents and 
other interesting reminders of the superstition, 
witchcraft and quaint customs of early New 
England history. 

The House of Seven Gables, with its ad- 
joining garden, tiny front shop with jangling 
bell, its secret stairway and quaintly furnished 
spacious rooms overlooking the harbor, sug- 
gest at every turn, the life and traditions of 
the Pyncheon family, immortalized by Na- 
thaniel Hawthorne. Surely the Salem trip 
abounds in historical and literary interest, and 
in the delights of a typical New England 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



drive, combining the beauties of country, sea 
and shore. 

Tuesday, October 23, the Cercle Frangais 
held its first meeting. The following officers 
were elected : President, Phyllis Hessin ; Vice- 
President, Marie Boucher ; Secretary, Sylvia 
Starr ; Treasurer, Bella Jacobs. 

Christian Endeavor was led October 26 
by Edith Hadley. Her topic was "Just Folks," 
in which she emphasized the real worth of 
so-called trivial things. 

Hallowe'en ! Spooks, a pitch black passage 
way, grinning jack-o'-lanterns welcomed us to 
the ghostly gymnasium. Soon with lights on, 
to the music of jazz, we spied in the merry 
maze of dancers, children in pinafores or over- 
alls, clowns and sheiks, jostling good-natured- 
ly against pirates, Orientals, Indians, Con- 
tinentals. The prize for the most original cos- 
tume was awarded Maud Wilcox, who ap- 
peared as a walking pumpkin. Dancing, stunts, 
games and refreshments made the evening a 
huge and howling success. 

November 2. Dr. Keever, our school phy- 
sician, gave a lecture on Health. He warned 
us against certain prevalent risks and gave us 
valuable general, as well as medical, advice. 

November 13. The Cercle Frangais held 
their bi-weekly meeting, Phyllis Hessin pre- 
siding. After the roll call several important 
matters were discussed. During the year sev- 
eral entertainments will be given by the club, 
each class giving its own presentation. After 
the meeting the girls were served with tea, 
while Mademoiselle Le Royer told folk stories 
in an extremely interesting way. 



And at the given signal 

All rush forward into the starlit night — 

"S-E— S-E— S-E-N-I- 

N-I— N-I— N-I-O-R- 

S-E-N-I-O-R-S SENIORS!" 

What can it mean ? Why — 

Caps and gowns, of course ! 

Esther Palmer, '24 



BLACK AND WHITE 

Silence ! 

Through the darkness a figure glides, 

A figure swathed in obscurity. 

First one and then another, then many. 

Swiftly, noiselessly they move through the ebony 

gloom. 
Hark! 

What sound is that? Who comes? 
The figures stop — 
With bated breath they wait. 
There is a rushing, swirling sound, — 
Then the figures relax. 
More phantom-like forms appear 
Thronging the murky dungeon ; 



THE HAND OF FATE— BY A JUNIOR 

FINGER 

in 
DIRTY WORK AT THE CROSSROADS. 
When Mr. Towne cautiously crept into 
view with classifications, he little foresaw 
what a cyclone he was releasing. 

A STORM RUMBLES ON THE HORIZON. 
About 4.30 Monday morning, we were 
awakened and told to hurry and dress and 
get four in a room. 

THE GATHERING OF THE CLAN. 
Then we heard some of the Woodlandites 
coming, and by and by nearly the whole cor- 
ridor on "second" was filled. Some went 
back to sleep dressed, and then — • 

TO THE LOWEST DEPTHS. 

At 5.50 we arose and crept silently and 
stealthily to the cellar below P. K. Here in 
the early hour of the morning, we elected the 
following officers : 

President — Jessie Matteson. 

Vice-President — Katherine Lalley. 

Secretary — Sally Barnum. 

Treasurer — Ruth Voltz. 

Song Leader — Patty Berkson. 

Cheer Leader — Glenna Bullis. 

THE WARNING. 

We certainly led the Seniors a merry chase. 

I understand that about 6.00 some "Soph- 
ies" dashed over to Gardner howling that Ju-' 
niors were out "electing," either at Woodland 
Country Club or — 

THE VILLAINS PURSUE HER. 
And some of them followed our dear Patty 
on her shopping trip to the Vil (few of them 
have ever known as much geography before), 
while others dashed to Woodland — . 

THE PLOT THICKENS. 
Great was our relief when our officers were 
safely elected, and formally announced in a 



r 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



triumphant snake dance. On Monday after- 
noon we elected our permanent officers and 
by a strange coincidence the same officers 
were elected so we didn't bother to announce 
it. Monday morning found most of us sleepy 
in study hall or in our rooms, but — 

A FRESH OUTBURST. 

Not the Freshmen! When we entered the 
dining-room at noon, a deafening (?) roar 
greeted our ears and we heard the Freshies 
cry — 

President — Ella Richards. 

Vice-President — Louisa Mueller. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Gertrude Powdrell. 

Cheer Leader — Julia Larrabee. 

A SPECIAL DESPATCH. 

During the afternoon the Specials got to- 
gether and in some hidden nook held their 
elections, which were announced at dinner: 

President — Helen McNab. 

Vice-President — Bernice Parker. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Emily Brown. 

Song Leader — Evelyn Speed. 

A STRATEGIC RETREAT. 
Still the tenseness of the exciting Monday 
kept up after dinner. The "Sophies" quietly 
stole to Gardner to have their elections. The 
entire Junior class discovered them and a 
"free for all" resulted. The cellar was full 
of Juniors, and several were caught trying 
to climb in through windows or to force doors. 

FOILED ! 

But the Seniors were not having Open 
House that evening, and little ceremony was 
lost in impressing this upon us. Before 8.00 
the lusty lungs of the Sophomores announced 
their results : 

President — Betty Lunn. 

Vice-President — Helen Hanson. 

Secretary-Treasurer — -Lois Bryant. 

Song Leader — Barbara Cushing. 

THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM. 
"At last !" thought the tired underclassmen, 
"we may rest in peace after one exciting day." 
But for the Seniors it was more watchful- 
ness, and so it was that when the weary and 
unsuspecting Juniors lay nicely tucked in their 



beds, awaiting the teachers' "Good night," the 
Senior class of '24 gave their yell outside of 
Gardner and singing their Senior song, in caps 
and gowns, began the procession toward 
Main. 

THE END OF A PERFECT DAY. 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

On Thursday, Oct. 25, our hockey team 
went to Newton to play the first game of the 
season. The game was won by the Newton 
girls by a score of 7 :0. Our girls, however, 
put up a good fight and we hope with the sup- 
port of the student body to conclude the sea- 
son successfully. 

The second game was played with the Rad- 
cliffe girls at Radcliffe College, Oct. 30. This 
also opened in a victory for our opponents with 
a score of 6:0. When we left for Radcliffe, 
we expected to play the Freshman team, but 
upon arriving, discovered we were to play the 
Varsity team. The girls showed fine spirit 
and did well to keep the score so low. We are 
all very sorry that Helen Mclntire was forced 
to return from the game on account of a dis- 
located knee and that she will probably be un- 
able to play the rest of the season. 

The faculty game, Nov. 1, of course, caused 
a great deal of excitement. Though the girls 
won by a wide margin, the faculty made them 
work for every goal, and we are very proud of 
their sportsmanship. The line-up was as fol- 
lows : 

Position Faculty Students 

Center Miss Farrar E. Hadley 

R. Inner Miss Lane E. Robbins 

R. Wing Miss Fenno R. Voltz 

L. Inner Miss Dudley E. Fairchild 

L. Wing Mr. Amesbury B. Cushing 

L. Half Miss Austin U. Jackson 

C. Half Miss Mattoon B. Saxton 

R. Half Miss Hemmeon C. Brown 

L. Full Mrs. Hooker D. Redman 

j Miss Stewart 

| Miss Wright 

Mr. Ordway F. Badger 



R. Full 
Goal 



R. Buffington 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



Our "eleven" referee, Gert Westerhoff, and 
our timekeeper, Ruth Johnson, proved effec- 
tive as well as efficient, and we heartily thank 
them for their services. 

On Thursday, Nov. 8, the Varsity Squad 
challenged the second squad. The game ended 
in a victory for the Varsity, but the game was 
decidedly interesting and well played by both 
teams. 

All who came out and cheered at the Senior- 
Junior game, we are sure felt well repaid. 
The game was by far the most exciting one 
of the season, the feeling between the Seniors 
and Juniors being very keen. The Seniors 
were victors by a score of 3:0. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Seniors Juniors 

E. Hadley F. Finney 

G. Westerhoff E. Fairchild 
E. Clendenin 

E. Robbins 
P. Gagne 
L. Norris 
L. Parry 

C. Brown 

D. Redman 
M. Chase 

F. Badger 
In the second half the following changes 

were made in the Junior line-up : L. Inner, 

Christine Chamberlin; C. Half, M. Mc- 

Cutcheon; L. Half, E. Hart; R. Half, E. 
Love. 



We extend to Mr. Bassett and his bride our 
most hearty congratulations and good wishes. 
A large Lasell party at Intervale would assure 
a delightful and profitable occasion for every- 
one, and incidentally it would be an appropriate 
acknowledgment of the many courtesies we 
have had at the hands of Mr. Bassett. 

Those who have taken this excursion need 
no urging, and those who have not, only need 
to ask someone who has. For the present just 
set aside February 15 to February 18. Fur- 
ther announcement in the January Leaves. 



Center 
R. Inner 
R. Wing 
L. Inner 
L. Wing 
R. Half 
C. Half 
L. Half 
R. Full 
L. Full 
Goal 



R. Voltz 
H. Berkson 
S. Barnum 
L. Shepard 
M. E. Jameson 
J. Miller 
J. Matteson 
R. Buffington 
D. Hagadorn 




WATCHING THE SHENANDOAH GO OVER 



THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP. 

Invitation for Reunion. 

The Lasell excursion to Intervale will come 
this year, Friday, February 15, to Monday, 
February 18. With the thought of making it 
in part a reunion of former students, a special 
invitation is extended to graduates and former 
students to join with us this year on this excur- 
sion. 

A recent letter from Mr. Bassett said, "I 
am doing time in Maine in order to get a mar- 
riage license." This was followed on the next 
day by the wedding announcement. 




The Personal Editor glanced over the 
long list of wedding announcements in the 
November Leaves and exclaimed, "I guess 
Cupid will have no word for the December 
number," but our fair readers will see she 
was mistaken. 

On Tuesday, the sixth of November, at 
South Bend, Indiana, Helene Westervelt '20 
became Mrs. Wagner Perrin Thielens. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thielens will be at home after the 
first of July at Decatur, Illinois. 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



Edna Sara Starrett '22 and Mr. Stephen 
Lancaster Mathewson were married on No- 
vember 5. A full and fascinating account 
of this wedding came to us from the 
Bangor daily paper. The bride was gowned 
in white canton crepe and silver lace with 
court train, and our own Bernice Cole was 
the Maid of Honor. Mr. and Mrs. Mathew- 
son are now at home at 3510 Sixteenth 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Julia Ellen Crafts '10 was married Thurs- 
day evening, the fifteenth of November, to 
Mr. Rennie Philip Sheridan. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow were interested 
recently to receive the announcement of the 
marriage of the daughter of Alice Anderson 
Kountze '95, Gertrude Kountze, to Mr. 
Henry Ray Millard on Saturday, the first of 
December, at New York. They will be at 
home after the first of January at 1255 
North State Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

The White Mountain girls of the past 
years who have enjoyed this winter sport 
under the able leadership of Mr. Seth Bas- 
sett will be interested to learn of his recent 
marriage on November 19 to Miss Lillian 
York Bassett at South Paris, Maine. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Ruth Wardle (1918-19) to Mr. Benjamin 
A. Livingston has been received. 

Katherine Foster (1919-21) has an- 
nounced her engagement to Mr. Ralph 
Benedict Vernon. 

Lasell joins in hearty congratulations to 
these happy brides and grooms, and brides 
and grooms-to-be. 

Our Barbara Pinkham of last year, and 
still claimed by Lasell, is convalescing. A 
kind message was received from her re- 
cently and it contained a promise to visit 
Lasell in the near future. 

Vernice Hartpence Wrope (1917-18) rode 
up to the Seminary in a fine Peerless car. 
We were glad, too, to meet her husband. Ver- 
nice seemed to remember every nook and 
corner of the school and showed a great 
deal of interest in former teachers and 
students. We are very much interested to 



learn that through marriage Vernice is re- 
lated to Margaret Reid Perry '22. 

Hazel Hutchins Moore and her now big- 
little daughter paid their respects to the 
Seminary. We learn with pleasure that 
Hazel hopes soon to locate in Auburndale, 
her old home town. 

Nell Woodward Collins '15 surprised us 
recently by "running in," and certainly she 
was one of the happiest looking brides 
Lasell has ever welcomed home. She is 
now settled in a house of her own at Read- 
ing and extends a most cordial invitation to 
the Lasell folk to accept her hospitality. 

Lasell was happy to have a real visit from 
Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Potter of Minneapolis, 
the brother and sister of our Preceptress, 
and parents of Mary Potter McConn '05, 
Julia Potter Schmidt '06, and dear Lillie 
Potter (1905-7), whom Lasell still remem- 
bers tenderly. 

Lucy Curtis '80 is now at home for the 
winter in St. Petersburg, Florida. 

Carrie Kendig Kellogg '79 has gone to 
her winter home in Columbia, South Caro- 
lina. 

Lasell girls of last year especially will be 
interested and pleased to learn that Lucile 
Norris is now leader of the Glee Club, 
Helen Schroer, president of the Christian 
Endeavor, and Katherine Webb, the Lasell 
Missionary Society's new president. 

Mr. Earl H. Ordway is a regular member 
of the faculty, being an instructor in "House 
Furnishing." 

Lasell Juniors this year are favored in 
having our local Congregational pastor, 
Rev. Edward Payson Drew, in charge of 
their weekly Bible Class. Dr. Drew has 
been for a number of years on the faculty 
of the Gordon Bible School of Boston. 

Ruth Mayes had a delightful surprise this 
month in the form of a call from her father, 
Mr. J. H. Mayes, of Charlotte, N. C. 

Blanche Avery's mother and two sisters 
came to Lasell and made a real visit of sev- 
eral days recently. 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



Lois Bryant's mother and sister were also 
among the November guests at our school. 

Our Preceptress was surprised and de- 
lighted to learn that the grand aunts of 
Doris Woodruff were Lasell girls, Bessie E. 
Sabin (1856-8) and Sallie L. Sabin (1876- 
1877). We hope that later we may have 
the pleasure of welcoming them back to 
their old school. 

Marjorie Gifford Grimm '22 writes that 
she and her mother are house settling and 
Mr. Grimm is just about to take his law 
examination for the New Jersey bar. We 
wish that all of Marjorie's friends still at 
Lasell felt as sure of "passing" with high 
honor as will her gifted husband on the 
coming testing day. 

Miss Margarita Ells, Art teacher of last 
year, dropped in recently for an altogether 
too short visit. She is enjoying her work 
in one of the neighboring Newton schools. 

A minor note came into our happy school 
family this fall for we learned of the pass- 
ing away of dear Madeline Whittaker. She 
was obliged to withdraw from the school 
last year on account of failing health, and 
we had hoped that rest and change of cli- 
mate would prove a panacea. Our tender 
sympathy is extended to her bereaved fam- 
ily and friends. 

Our Preceptress has recently received a 
very homey and dear message from Mar- 
garet Reid Perry '22. Among other bits of 
interesting news she writes : "We have 
built our own little home here in Maple- 
wood, N. J., and have been in it for just 
one week. You would love it, I am sure, a 
little white colonial house alongside of a 
babbling brook. I am doing my own work 
and find it very interesting. I rather wish 
now, however, that I had taken while at 
Lasell, the two year Home Economics 
Course." (Lasell girls of today, please 
profit by this suggestion!) "I will add, 
however, I have found my business course 
very helpful, and am hoping to come back 
to the school for Commencement in June." 



Margaret's new address is 23 Beach Place, 
Maplewood, N. J. 

November was a busy month for "Betty" 
Mitchell '23 and Louisa Venable '23, for 
they both made their debut. However, 
Betty added in the note announcing this 
social venture that she was doing some 
really worthwhile work, has a fine class of 
little boys in Sunday School and is enjoying 
some advanced work in Bible study which 
we know will be very well done. 

Ruth Hopkins '23 is to-day a student at 
Bates College and enjoying this college 
very much. In her letter to one of our 
Seniors she pays a very high compliment 
to Lasell and has a most loving word for 
her instructors. We wish her deserved suc- 
cess and appreciate her kindly words. 

Through the courtesy of Mr. George S. 
Dunham, Lasell was fortunate in being able 
to secure a visit from Mr. Charles D. Isaac- 
son of New York, author and lecturer on 
musical subjects. His friend, Mr. Dunham, 
writes : "Mr. Isaacson's greatest work is per- 
haps in the wonderful series of free con- 
certs developed through the columns of the 
New York Globe and later the Evening Mail." 

Audiences of over 3,500,000 people have 
listened to the very greatest artists in this 
series of concerts. 

To select two opinions from the com- 
ments of some of our greatest thinkers : Dr. 
Frank Crane says, "Charles D. Isaacson is 
a music missionary. He is of more real 
cultural value to New York than all its pri- 
vate concerts. He is as valuable as the 
Metropolitan Opera House." 

Elbert Hubbard, "You are to music what 
the railroad is to commerce— you take music 
from where it is, to where it is needed." 

His talk was both interesting and stimu- 
lating to the girls, especially his wonderful 
recital of the story of "Rigoletto," which 
many were to attend the following week. 

Bertha Gray Richards (1887-8) of Los 
Angeles came East to attend the great 
American Board Missionary Conference 
held in Wellesley, and incidentally dropped 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 




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« Maude Wilcox 

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!>> Esther Adams 
f,< PhijMis Hessiri 



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MaWeU&Crtase 
. Marie Boucher 






a Marti Boucher H Luciie Hopkins 

« K&fcketme ftwx n Dorothueiaain 101 Kulhvoltz 

?« Helfk.Wtsklcjuist S5 Jecinrtbue ScariB iai Virginia Smiecfinq 

?& leti tia Shepard go lousse Hsoemaii ioa Jea.fi Mac Kau 

c ..... ^.i-hinq 91 Rut 1 " 0...2j— - ni k 






J&u^%» 



in to pay her respects to the old school 
home. We have her word for it that she 
was a Lasell girl thirty-five years ago and 
we must believe her, notwithstanding, in 
the words of her principal emeritus, "It 
seemed unthinkable that she had been in 
this world over thirty-five years." Those of 
us who had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. 
Richards are still grateful for her loyalty to 
the school and for her high ideals which she 
hopes are being maintained at Lasell. 

Miss True has received this message from 
Elaine Eaton Underhill '18. She writes, 
"My news for you this year is a word about 
our new little daughter, born July 16, who is 
a dainty fairy sort of person. Can you 
guess her name? Lois. For Lois Nichols 
'18, my room-mate of yore. Her full name 
is Barbara Lois, the first name is for my 
little sister. Our boy was two years old 
yesterday. He is a perfect wonder in every 
way, as any mother would say of her own." 

Among the "old girls" returning, none 
was more welcome than dear Emma Smith 
of last year. We have not yet become rec- 
onciled to giving her up and hope some 
day in the future she will return to finish 
her course with us. 



Dorothy Sprague '20 burst into our midst 
recently for just an hour, but did not stay 
nearly long enough with the Personal Editor 
for her to find out just what Dorothy is doing. 
Whatever it is, it evidently agrees with her 
for she was the personification of health and 
good spirits. 

Among the delegates to the Women's 
Board of the Congregational Church held at 
Wellesley, was our trustee, Mrs. Britton. 
She kindly took the time from the confer- 
ence to call at Lasell and bring with her 
the daughter of Mary Gurley Betts (1899- 
00). 

Our Preceptress openly declared that the 
most delightful and fascinating call she has 
received this year was none other than that of 
Mr. Samuel Russell Penney 3d, eighteen 
months old and son of Elzada Mae Bailey 
Penney, Jr., of Auburn, Maine. Elzada and 
her sister, Emma Jane Bailey Matthews, Jr., 
were the guests of their younger sister, 
Moselle Bailey, one of our present Lasell 
girls. The wee son certainly captivated the 
hearts of all who had the chance to see this 
unusually winsome and precious baby. 

Maria Orozco is evidently in love all over 
again with her Mexico. She writes from 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



£ . 4. 



m ~ i. 






'■^T ■ «, 34 35 as 



_ , „ W Virqim»Oi«her 

I3i Dorothy Wardwell 14* Marion Miles 
I3l Ruby Hojabird, 149 Florence Tyler 



|J» Hope Bean 

160 LoiS Brqaat 

161 Rutk Buffmqton 
|6t Maru Paqe 

■nacStee r 



173 Maru Jameson 
)74 Miriam Smith. 
lis Helen Landon 
nl Marjorie Kitchens 
TO Annette Durk— 
rjt Beatrir - ' 

m Maricri 



181 Doris Nelson 

189 E«a- Mau /Mortimer 

190 Elizabeth Lee 

191 Alberta Wiqht 
191 Dorothu Cook 



104 Catherine Beecher 
10 J Ann Greene 
aol Muriel Alctautklm 
"n.Ihomas 
itJlo« 



jo'SuMf./Maojes 141 Frances fVnnet 

n. EHaioe (44 Barbar 

» Ett'zabeMFirisk - i4s Graces 1 

S4 Horte : - rsi 



h Ska-' 



itoiiM Virqsn, 
ton ISS Elsi. £ 
n ..-' Suiv 4 



I'temMarts a - e 1 

rctCotdon iiV Eh 
-'"•A 414. Be 

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1 



one of the suburbs of Mexico City, "It is a 
very picturesque little town almost at the 
foot of the volcanoes and the scenery is be- 
yond description. It seems so unusual to 
see all the flowers in bloom at this time of 
the year and the woods are as green as 
ever." Maria will begin her active work as 
a teacher in January when the school year 
opens in Mexico. 

Dr. and Miss Morganthaler have been 
recent guests of Dr. and Mrs. Winslow. 
They were full of enthusiasm for their sum- 
mer at their lovely camp at Willoughby 
Lake, Vermont, and were full of plans for 
their return to their winter home at Day- 
tona, Florida. 

In the midst of her busy life, Edith Mc- 
Clure Patterson '02, took time to make a 
detour in favor of her old school home. 
Lasell had the privilege of listening to an 
illuminating and most interesting talk by 
Mrs. Patterson who is now the head of the 
Home Budget Division of the General Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs. In addition to 
her wise counsels concerning the conserva- 
tion of money, she gave a very fascinating 
stereopticon lecture on her travels in South 
America and Mexico. 



Dr. Eliza Day Kendrick was the Vesper 
Speaker at our Monthly Missionary Meet- 
ing in November. Dr. Kendrick has spent a 
part of her sabbatical year in one of the uni- 
versities of China and gave a most interesting 
talk of her personal experiences in the Orient. 
Her coming brought together a number of 
her former associates in the Lasell faculty, 
Miss Mary P. Witherbee, Mrs. Frank F. 
Davidson, who succeeded Miss Kendrick as 
instructor in Greek and Latin in our school, 
and Miss Lillian M. Packard. This group 
of teachers were the guests of Dr. and Mrs. 
Winslow. 

Lydia Adams '18 has settled temporarily 
in Boston to our delight. She is still in- 
terested in her violin and has promised to 
join the Lasell Orchestra, coming once a 
week for practice with our local musicians. 

Mary Saunders is now a Tufts College 
girl, but nevertheless is loyal to her old 
school and friends and occasionally rejoices 
us by coming home for a wee visit. 

Miss Witherbee has shared her letter from 
Jeanne McKay, 1911, with the "Personal" 
Editor, who declares after reading it she felt 
very much as if she had taken an airship and 
had a glorious trip to that Montana country 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



which Jean so fascinatingly describes. In ref- 
erence to her recent trip to the Atlantic coast 
she writes, "It has been such a busy summer I 
am amazed to see the yellow trees and colored 
bushes. I could easily awaken and tell my- 
self it is only May. It has been a pleasant 
summer because I have been very well. I 
have all my nice Atlantic avoirdupois and lots 
of 'pep.' I believe that is the proper word. 
I am so glad that I had such a long, lovely 
winter because I can see that it will be a long 
time before I have another. I have only been 
away from the ranch two nights since then, 
and then on business. ... I never read much 
in the summer except magazines and I have 
a generous supply of these. I did enjoy New- 
ton's 'Doctor Johnson.' It is such a friendly 
introduction to folks I have read about but 
never really met before. . . . Canning has 
occupied large portions of many days and I 
have dignified rows of the fruits of our and 
other fields. Today I tucked away grape jelly, 
plums, and peaches. Last year I canned lots 
so that my family would be well provided dur- 
ing my absence and this year it is for my own 
comfort and peace. I will be pretty busy for 
about two months yet and then comes the 
long winter. This ranch may be isolated, it 
may be dull for stretches, but time certainly 
does not hang heavily for some months." 
Jeannie closes with loving greetings to all the 
Lasell folk. 

Marion Briggs, 1908-10, had a delightful 
summer spent in touring New England. She 
is no longer at the Peabody Home. Her new 
address is Barstow Street, Mattapoisett, Mass. 
She writes she loves this part of the country 
so much that she will soon be considered "one 
of the Cape Cod folks." Mattapoisett is the 
Indian name for "Place of Rest," and surely 
is a peaceful quiet village. The school enjoys 
supervised student government and she de- 
clares it works very well considering the size 
of the school and that about one half of the 
children are Portuguese. We wish Marion 
success in her new venture. 



JOKES 



Absent-minded professor had left his 
berth in the sleeper and was hopelessly lost 
in the middle of the aisle. "Don't you re- 
member the number of your berth?" asked 
the conductor. 

'T'm-er-afraid not," was the reply. 

"Well, haven't you any idea where it 
was?" 

"Why — oh, yes, to be sure. I did notice 
this afternoon that the window looked out 
upon a little lake." 



'Papa, there is a large black bug on the 



ceiling." 



Papa (absent-minded as usual) : "Step 
on it and leave me alone." 



Parent: "What is your reason for wish- 
ing to marry my daughter?" . 

Young man: "I have no reason, sir: I 
am in love." 



DAINTY CAKES 

Your cookies, jumbles, drop and 
layer cakes will be delicious if you 
use RUMFORD, the wholesome 
Baking Powder. It imparts to 
cake and hot breads that delicacy 
of texture and flavor sought for by 
all good cooks. Make tomorrow's 
cake with 



RUMFORD 

The Wholesome 

BAKING POWDER 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



Sympathetic old lady : "What brought 
you to prison, my poor man?" 

Surly convict : "The patrol wagon." 



First Gentleman : "I have a new position 
now with the Railroad Company." 

Second Gentleman : "That's fine, what 
are your duties?" 

First Gentleman : "You know the man 
who goes alongside of the train and taps 
the axles to see if everything is all right? 
Well, I help him listen." 



Artillery Rookie (about to take his first 
lesson in horsemanship) : "Sergeant, please 
pick me out a nice gentle horse." 

Stable Sergeant: "D'ja ever ride a horse 
before?" 

Rookie: "No." 

Sergeant : "Oh, here's just the animal for 
you. He's never been ridden before, you 
can both start together." 



A CALENDAR ROMANCE 

Our hero was the common sort, when all is said 

and done ; 
He worked his head off daily, and was out to get 

the Mon. 

The reason for his diligence was commonplace, 'tis 

true — 
He tried to swell his salary so it would suffice for 

Tue. 

And maybe that's the reason why one day he lost 

his head, 
And falling on his knees, he cried, "Oh, maiden, wilt 

thou Wed?" 

He may have thought this sudden, but it seemed not 

so to her ; 
She lisped a quick acceptance and said forcibly, 

"Yeth, Thur." 

But when they went to keeping house he feared that 

he would die. 
For oh, that modern maiden could neither bake nor 

Fri. 

She could not run a bungalow nor even run a flat, 
So on many sad occasions in a restaurant they Sat. 

But he forgave her everything — as man has always 

done, 
When she presented him one day a bouncing baby 

Sun. 



REVEALING RHYMES 

Introducing our "Revealing Rhymes" 
Which endeavor to tell through their lines, 

A few tiny details 

Of Lasell's great females 
Who are here at the present time. 



Now we all know the Senior named Wraggs, 
Whose busy tongue just wags and wags. 

She's so funny, it hurts, 

And the things that she blurts 
Could be said by nobody but Wraggs. 

Surely every one knows Bobbie Niday: 
She's most individual in her way. 

As a slammer of doors, 

Why ! she wins highest scores. 
Some new funny thing she does every day. 

But there's one girl who's always on the step, 
And she's our most musical Pep. 

To our school she's so true, 

And her faults are so few, 
That we simply cannot spoil her Rep. 

Mazie Parry is such a cute girl, 

She can just put our minds in a whirl. 

She's an imp, but so sweet, 

With her, few can compete. 
She's truly a peach and a pearl. 

There's some one whom we all admire, 
To be like her, many aspire : 

E. Clendenin's her name, 

She plays a square game, 
Of her management we'll never tire. 

There's some one whom we all will back, 
And she's our most athletic "Mac," 

In all sports she'll excel, 

And in studies as well, 
For a fact, there's not much that she'll lack. 

Every one must know Lydia Parry, 
Who is always so gay and so merry, 
There's not much she can't do, 
She's a good sport clean through, 
And could never be called stationary. 

Fran Badger's a girl we all know : 
She's one of the best at Lasell — 

She's so big and strong, 

With her you'll not go wrong, 
For her, many a good soul has "fell." 



MONDAY MORNING SOLILOQUY 
To arise or not to arise, that is the question, 
Whether it is better to stay in bed 
And snooze amid warm blankets or be sent to Study 

Hall, Monday. 
But by staying in bed, to sleep, sweet sleep, 
Some more : and by sleep to dream 
Your room-mate puts the window down. 
Oh, how warm ! It is divine ! 

To sleep, perchance be caught ! Ay, there's the rub ; 
For in the stolen sleep, what dreams may come, 
Since we know two hours' hard labor must be done. 
(Apologies to Shakespeare.) 

Elsie Duffy, '24. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



That 

Fascinating 

Placet 



(T 



=fn 



(EompattE 




Why tramp all over town looking for clever 
and unusual things when you can do the 
most of your choosing all in one place ? 

From the far places of the earth we have 
brought gifts for your approval. 

May we show them to you? 

Qift Shop — Seventh Floor — Annex 




BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



;•.- BAKE R'S a 

;aracas sw.ee i 

chocolate 




m MADE BY .«- 
.WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

DORCHESTER.MASS. 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 



Established 1780 



DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Now Showing 

Clever Styles 

in 

Slim Line Apparel 



Fashionable Blouses 

and 

Pretty Sweaters 

Clifford S. Cobb Company 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 

g X Brothers 

TZobists 

Cljnu? Snaps, ItnUts an* (®rrl|t&j0 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 




CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



Home of the Better Made Boston Joker, Dribble 
Glass, Novelty Favor Hats, Unique Rose and Shaker 
Horn, Rose Cricket and Doily Blow Outs. 

Masks, Puzzles, Place Cards, Noise Makers, Joke 
Books, Parlor Game Books, Trick and Fortune Telling 
Cards, Bridal and Birthday Cake, Fortune Telling Sets. 

Serpentine, Confetti, Coo Coo and Dippy Dip Stunts, 
Novelty and Gas Inflated Balloons. Also other Clever 
Joker Novelties, Dance, Dinner and Party Favors. 



YOUR SPECIAL PARTY COLORS IN FAVORS TO ORDER 

HOLIDAY SPECIALTY FAVORS IN THEIR SEASON 
22 BROMFIELD STREET, ( Up One Flight) BOSTON-9, MASS, 



SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Evening Slippers Orthopedic Shoes 

Ballet Slippers Walking Shoes 

Gymnasium Shoes Sports Shoes 

Suitable Hosiery 

A. H. HOWE & SONS 
WALK -OVER SHOPS 



170 Tremont St.— 378 Washington St. 
BOSTON 



2359 Washington St. 
ROXBURY 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



BANKING SERVICE 

The Newton Trust Company 
solicits checking and savings 
accounts from the faculty and 
students of Lasell Seminary. 

Our Auburndale Office is 
located conveniently near the 
school and station, corner of 
Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

Newton Trust Company 


WE WANT TO BE 
OF SERVICE 

to you and to all of our customers. 
Do not hesitate to come to us if we 
can be of help to you. 

The 

Wellesley National Bank 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 


LEWANDOS 

Cleansing 
or Dyeing 

often saves 

Buying 

Cleaners Dyers Launderers 

BOSTON SHOPS 

17 Temple Place 284 Boylston Street 

248 Huntington Avenue 

79 Summer Street 

29 State Street 

Broofcline— 1310 Beacon Street 

Cambridge — 1274 Massachusetts Avenue 

Watertown— 1 Galen Street (at works) 

Shops and deliveries in suburbs 

Telephone Service Back Bay 3900 

"YOU CAN RELY ON LEWANDOS" 


Dr. Briggs S. Palmer 

OPTOMETRIST 
1 49 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



T. O.Metcalf Company 



PRINTERS 



Is 




T)esii 



igners Rfiffi Jlnp ravers 
152 Purchase Street Boston 



TELEPHONE CONGRESS 3820 



WILL C. EDDY, AUBURNDALE 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



PHOTOGRAPHER FOR LASELL 



Ye Craftsman Studio 



561 Boylston Street 

Boston, Mass. 

Tel. Back Bay 7040 



599 Massachusetts Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Tel. University 3642 



BURDITT & WILLIAMS CO. 
builders HARDWARE general 

Mechanics' Tools, Automobile Sundries, Electrical 
Appliances, Fine Cutlery 

160 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON 
Telephone Congress 6690 



PHONE CONGRESS 835 

RICHARD E. THIBAUT 

INCORPORATED 

PEERLESS WALL PAPERS 

Largest Wall Paper House in the World 

93 FEDERAL STREET 

Near Franklin Street 



NEW YORK 
BROOKLYN 



BOSTON 



BRONX 

NEWARK 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



SAMUEL HOLMES J. FREDERICK HOLMES 

FRANK W. HOLMES 



SAMUEL HOLMES, INC. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



POULTRY AND GAME 



Stalls 10-12-14-16 and 17-19 Faneuil Hall Market 



Basement 3 South Side 



Boston, Mass. 



Tel. Richmond 708 - 709 - 35 1 3 



CARPET CONTRACTORS 




WE FURNISH AND LAY CARPETS 



F. A. BREWER CO. 



212 Summer St. 



Tel. Main 4669 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 

Blouses, Skirts, Silk 

Petticoats, Sweaters 

and Furs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 




Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




81 




383 WASHINGTON ST 

BOSTON 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huol, Treas. E.J. Monetise, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 



New York 



Chi 



icago 



QUALITY 




£f» SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese. Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH, 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



Established 1842 Capital paid in $90,000.00 Incorporated 1910 

Sands, Furber & Co. , Inc. 

COMMISSION FRUITS 

MERCHANTS VEGETABLES 

16 & 17 Nonh Side J Faneuil Hall Market, 
e. a. reed. Pres. BOSTON, MASS. 

F.W.RICE.Vice-Pres. 
C.H.CUMM1NGS TELEPHONE 

Treas. & Gen'l Mgr. 1552 RICHMOND 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



DORACO 

QUALITY - GOODS 

THE BEST 

Arthur E. Dorr & Co., Inc. 

Six Large Markets 
We Ship Everywhere 



John J. Sullivan, Treas. G. Francis Janes, Pres. 

John J. Foley, Vice Pres. 

Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 

DEALERS IN 

BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

6! & 63 Faneuil Hall Market 

Basement 1 I V2 South Side Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON 

Telephone Richmond 40 



TELEPHONE RICHMOND}^ 

NATHAN ROBBINS CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME 
BEEF. PORK AND LAMB 

33 and 35 Faneuil Hall Market 

33 North Market Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Telephone Richmond 1463 

Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 

Fruit and Produce 

69, 71 and 73 Clinton Street 

OSMON C. BAILEY, President BOSTON, MASS. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 




THEODORE HAVILAND CHINA 

r I 'HE illustration features one of our newest importations from this famous French pottery. 
JL The border is a soft golden yellow with richly colored flowers and center design of 
hrilliant-plumaged birds of Paradise. 



530 
Atlantic Avenue 



Mitchell Woodbury Co. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



One Block from 
South Station 



V. A. PLUTA & CO. 

Meats and Provisions 

Fresh Vegetables in Season 



AUBURNDALE 
SQUARE 



Phone : 
West Newton 0229 



F. Capodanno & Sons 
AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 



57 and 58 N. Market St. 



Boston 



Geo. D. Emerson Co. 

WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 

Largest Distributors in New 
England of High Grade Fruits 
and Vegetables in number 
ten tins 



BOSTON, 



MASS. 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 




I 1923 ] 



$10.00 



An unusually Clever Design of the Sandal Type 

for street wear; in Gray, Log Cabin or 

Brown Nubuck or Black Russia Calf. 

Appropriate Hosiery 

T. E. MOSELEY CO. 

1 60 Tremont Street 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons, Inc. 

Caracul Jacquettes 

$115 and Upwards 

FOX SCARFS 

NATURAL WHITE, SILVER, 

BLUE AND RED, ALSO 

DYED IN ALL THE 

PREVAILING 

SHADES 

364 Boylston Street ArK„£"st«et 

Established 1858 



GIRLS 

Whenyou are think- 
ing of buying dress 
shoes, walking 
shoes, sneakers, 
ballet or gymnasium 
shoes think of 

CONNELL & CAREY 

(Formerly with Thayer McNeil Co.) 

Shop 4, Second Floor, Little Building 

80 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Beach 1167 



E. A. DAVIS & CO. 

Women's Wear 
Students' Supplies 

Lasell Banners, Pennants and Pillows 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 



Co&riie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



ANDREWS CORNER 

TEMPLE PLACE and WASHINGTON STREET 

NOW IN STOCK 

Alligator Trimmed Brown and 
Grey Sport Oxfords 

SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


WALTHAM, MASS., 233 MOODY ST.. Tel. 047 l-W. 
MALDEN, MASS.. 147 PLEASANT ST., Tel. 0631-W. 
QUINCY. MASS., 3 GRANITE ST., Tel. 0555-M. 
PAWTUCKET, R. I., 316 MAIN ST., Tel. 363-R. 

The 

Dorothy Benham 

Hat. 


Fine Hosiery, Beautiful Lingerie, 

Brassieres, Ties, Girdles Gifts, Novelties, 

Pennants and Pillows 


WINTER is COMING 

Be Prepared. Get Your 

LOMBARD 
MACKINAW 

Warm, Soft, Thick Coatings, Rich Plaids 

Send for Illustrated Booklet of 

Lombard Middies, Skirts, Breeches 
Sweaters, Knickers, Etc. 

LOMBARD MIDDY BLOUSE CO. 

ROOMS 304-309 
665 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

Two Doors from Boylston St. 


Madame Whitney 

557 WASHINGTON ST., WELLESLEY 


THE NOVELTY SHOP 

549 Washington Street 

Opp. Wellesley P. O. 

A Full Line of NO YES BROS., 

Gowns, Hosiery, Neckwear, 

Embroideries and Notions 

Novelties and Gifts of all Kinds 


Guaranteed Rubbers 
Fall and Winter Footwear 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 

The Auburndale Shoe Store 

PHILIP BERMAN, Proprietor 

295 Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 


Cotrell & Leonard 

Albany, N. Y. 

Caps 

Gowns 
Hoods 

for all degrees 


CURTIS & WELD 

Theatrical Costumers 

34 HAYWARD PLACE 
BOSTON 

Telephone Beach 4048 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins . 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



The Green Bough 
Tea Room 

597 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 

DAILY SERVICE FROM 12 TO 7.15 
SUNDAY SUPPER 5.30 TO 7.30 



Our 

Only Travelling Salesman 

"Mr. Postage Stamp" 



Nonantum Pad & Paper Co. 

NEWTONVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 




©pa Snom 




1 60 Tremont Street 



Between West and Boyl&ton 
Streets 



C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

Mxxbu Sralera 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 



MILLINERY 
DRESSES 
BLOUSES 

NOVELTIES 



SWEATERS 
CORSETS 

UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 



THE GRAY SHOP 

BEAUTY PARLOR 
2086 Commonwealth Ave. - - Auburndale 

Telephone W. N. 0980-R 



The 

Blue Dragon Tea House 

60 CENTRAL ST., WELLESLEY 

Week Days, 1 1 A. M. until 7.30 P. M. 
Sundays, 5.30 P. M. until 7.30 P. M. 

OVER-NIGHT GUESTS ENTERTAINED 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



OUR TABLE BRAND 
COFFEE is quality coffee. 

It has been roasted and 
blended to produce a de- 
licious, appetizing flavor. 

WEBSTER-THOMAS 

Tea & Coffee Co., 

219 State Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

- 


The National Memory and Fellowship Book 

Used at Lasell Seminary and at the Principal 
Colleges and Schools throughout the Country 

Published Exclusively by 

COLLEGE MEMORY BOOK CO. 

Chicago, 111. 


The Corner Tea Room 

Where you can get the famous 

Fudge Cake, Candies, 

Sandwiches, Ice Cream, etc. 

1 704 WASHINGTON STREET 


A FRIEND 


Johnson & Keyes Express Co. 

EDWARD F. SPENCER, Prop. 

FURNITURE AND PIANO 
MOVING 

436 Lexington Street 
Auburndale 


LASELL GIRLS 

IN THE 

White Mountains 

FOR 

WINTER SPORTS 

February 15-18, 1924 
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL 

SETH C. BASSETT, Conductor 


Jolly's 

451-455 MOODY STREET, WALTHAM 

Manufacturers of High-Grade Candies, 

Chocolates, Bonbons, Caramels 

and Hard Candies 

SPECIAL FANCY BOXES AND BASKETS 
FOR HOLIDAY TRADE, $1 TO $5 

Ice Cream Sodas College Ices 

Telephone Connection 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



Visit Our New Remodelled Store 

STUDENT'S SUPPLIES 

Fountain Pens, Ever-sharp Pencils, Loose-Leaf Devices 
High Grade Stationery 




57 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 
ENGRAVERS STATIONERS PRINTERS 



ATLANTIC PIPE AND SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

WROUGHT IRON AND STEEL PIPE 
Valves and Fittings for Steam, Gas and Water 

1 00 FRIEND STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



Printed Personal Stationery 



200 Single Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 
100 Double Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 

Printed with name and address 

Hammermill Bond, White, Blue or Gray 

Lasell Seminary Bookstore 
AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



$1.00 
1.00 



Try the Wonderful 

Day Dream Toilet Line 



at 



The Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



Compliments 

OLDS' FOOD SHOP 

2094 Commonwealth Avenue 
Auburndale, Mass. 




Art Supplies and Gifts 

DRAWING Supplies and 
Artists' Materials. Gifts 
and Greeting Cards in season. 
Parchment Lamp Shades and 
other decorations dear to the 
heart of the student miss. 

Spaulding-Moss Co. 

42 Franklin Street Just off Washington 

BOSTON 



The Green Gate Tea Shop 

LUNCHEON TEA DINNER 

SPECIAL PARTIES 

Birthday Calces a Specialty 

Also Cinnamon Buns, Doughnuts, Etc. 

Tel. West Newton 0396 



Store Tel. West Newton 1 27 1 



Greenhouses W. N. 0922 



Riggs The Florist 

Flowers for All Occasions 

2098 Commonwealth Avenue 

Auburndale, Mass. 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 



W. E. TOMLINSON 

Bicycles and Repairing 

FLASH LIGHTS 
Motor Cycles, Auto Supplies 

1 42 1 -3 Washington St., West Newton, Mass. 
TELEPHONE 0169 


All ^a^nnable SHowers 

mag br Ijafc at our 

(©ttr AritsiH are ahuaija at your sreuire 
($ur prirea are altuaita reasonable 

3xn Bt Itorg to ICasel! 

©rorea by mail nr t?lpjiri0nj? filleo tmtlt 
apreial rare 

Ijuwgljtnn (Sown} 

Jfllouirr Btyap 

Inter f ark Bt artmrrfj 
Hoston 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

C. F. EDDY CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 


E. B. DEACKS & CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

All kinds of Electric Wiring and Electric 
Utensils 


JOHN J. FORAN 

Builder, Contractor, Brick Mason 
and Plasterer 

Granolithic, Chimney, Fireplace and Tile 

RESIDENCE, 25 SHIRLEY STREET 
WEST NEWTON 65, MASS. 


Established 1882 Incorporated 1904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 


Genuine Leather Writing Cases 

Black, Purple, Blue, Old Rose and Brown 
Moire Silk Limner 




$3.95 

Initials Engraved on Buckle Free 




Woodland Park Garage 

TRUMAN C. CROWNER, Prop. 

DORT - service - KISSELL 

1 76 1 Washington Street, 
Aubumdale, Mass. 

Telephone, West Newton 1 788 




Thorp a Martin 

COMPANY 




66 


FRANKLIN STREET, BOST 


ON 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



Elizabeth Candy Shops 

316 Moody Street 108 Main Street 

Waltham Gardner 
Massachusetts 

When in either of the above Cities 

ijou will find delightful refreshments 

at our Shops 

Sandwiches and Hot Drinks, 
Ice Cream, Ice Cream Sodas, 
Sundaes, Milk Drinks, etc. in 
Various Flavors. Also Salted 
Nuts, Chocolates, Caramels and 
a large assortment of Candies — 
Made in our Shops 

Novelties for the Different Holidays 


WRIGHT & DITSON 

Athletic Outfitters 

Golf, Tennis, Baseball, Basket Ball, Hockey, 

Sweaters, Skates, Gymnasium Apparel, 

Sport Clothing and Shoes 

WOMEN'S DEPT.— 2nd Floor-Use Elevator 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 


Dwyer Pearce & Fogg 
— Silk Store — 

Always showing complete stocks of Silks for 
Street, Afternoon, Evening and Sport Wear 

Samples upon request 

25 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 

(OVER WETHERN'S) 


CLASS STATIONERY 

WHEN YOU WISH TO OBTAIN THE BETTER 

KIND OF CLASS STATIONERY, WRITE 

US FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 

The Adams Stationery Company, Holyoke, Mass. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth Are. 161 Tremont St. 1311 Walnut St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



NEW WRIST WATCHES 

Beautiful in Design, Dependable as 
Time Pieces 





$60.00 

15 Jewels— 18k White Gold 
Case. Extra heavy gold, narrow 
in shape, very refined. 



$60.00 

17 Jewels— 18k White Gold 
Case. Very finely engraved 
border in the very fashionable 
rectangular shape. 





$30.00 

15 Jewels— 14k White Gold 
Case. We guarantee this watch 
to be an excellent time keeper. 



$18.00 

1 5 Jewels — Green Gold Filled 
Case. The best value for the 
price we have ever sold. 



Christmas Gifts for Gentlemen 



GOLD JEWELRY 

SCARF PINS ... $3 to $50 
LINK BUTTONS . . $3 to $50 
POCKET KNIVES . $5 to $25 
PENCILS .... $7.50 to $25 
SIGNET RINGS ... $5 to $35 
CIGAR CUTTERS . . $10 to $20 
WALDEMAR CHAINS $7.50 to $35 



STERLING SILVER 

BELT BUCKLES . . $2 to $10 
EVERSHARP PENCILS $2.50 to $4 
CIGARETTE CASES . $10 to $30 
MATCH BOXES . . $3.75 to $10 
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES $1 to$15 
MILITARY BRUSHES $4 to $30 
AUTO LIC. CASES $3.50 to $7.50 




wfi 



liolesale^Rptait 



39*41 

SUMMER ST. 

JEWELERs r^ s ™ 



CCHOVCY&GJk 



F. F. DAVIDSON 



F. F. DAVIDSON, Jr. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 





Vol. XXXXIX 



No. 3 



JANUARY, 1924 



LASELL LEAVES 



rqp< 



C.&ftbVe$ Co. 

Established m£*i $^ 



EVENING SLIPPERS 




Superb brocades of Gold and Silver, 
rare tinsels and satins of lustrous sheen, 
decorations of sparkling and original 
beauty, make the present showing of 
I. Miller Evening Slippers one of 
fascinating attraction. 

Cuban, Baby Louis or Full Spanish Heels 



PRICED $12.50 

/. Miller Creations Exclusively at C. F. Hovey's, Boston, Mass. 



Jane Tooher Sports Clothes 

7 1 1 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 



GYMNASIUM GARMENTS 
MADE TO MEASURE 



OFFICIAL OUTFITTER FOR 

LASELL SEMINARY 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Silhouette Shop 

IS ON AUBURN STREET 

Opposite the Station 

Lunches Dinners 

Afternoon Tea 



ICE CREAM CANDY SODA HOT CHOCOLATE 



CH AS. BAXTER, Prop. Allbumdale Tel.W. Newton 1202-R 



-wMCffesnn 



TRADE MARK 



"Sportswomen's Headquarters' 5 

Tremont at Washington at 

West St. Bromfield St. 

BOSTON 

Distinctive and Attractive Women's Apparel 

for Street and Sports Wear 

Topcoats, Overcoats, Raincoats, Suits, Riding Habits, 

Dresses, Knickers, Breeches, Sweaters, Waists, 

Scarfs, Hose, Hats, Shoes 

Costumes for Skating, Snowshoeing, etc., Snowshoes, Skis, Toboggans, Skates 

Sportswomen's Headquarters is all that its name 
implies— Outfitter to Sportswomen in every field 
of sport, both the equipment and the clothing 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




LUX 

-for all fine fabrics 

Delicate, difficult colors — weaves that 
are chiffon thin — even your frailest 
things can be made to last if carefully 
laundered. 

LUX is so pure it will not injure any- 
thing that pure water alone will not 
harm. 

LEVER BROTHERS COMPANY 



Beattie & McGuire 



Famous for 



SILKS, DRESS GOODS, COATINGS, 



LINENS, LADIES' HOSIERY 



HANDKERCHIEFS 



Noted for Lower Prices and Better Values 



29 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 



"PURITY ICE" 

IS ONLY 

NEWTON DRINKING 
WATER FROZEN 

Clean, Pure and Economical 
Use it in your New Home 



Purity Ice Co., Inc. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 
Telephone, Centre Newton 0069 

All that it's cracked up to be 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 

ax Brothers 

TlOPISTS 

©Ijflu? iRoaea, Utobta ana ©rrijtfoa 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 




CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 




SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Evening Slippers Orthopedic Shoes 

Ballet Slippers Walking Shoes 

Gymnasium Shoes Sports Shoes 

Suitable Hosiery 

A. H. HOWE & SONS 
WALK -OVER SHOPS 



170 Tremont St.— 378 Washington St. 
BOSTON 



2359 Washington St. 
ROXBURY 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




More than 1 00 years in business 



Rooms as fresh as a new frock — 

Let linoleum strike the note in the less formal rooms of your home. 
It comes in such a variety of patterns ; it is so durable, so sanitary, so 
cheerful that it has become almost the standard floor for bedroom, 
bath, kitchen and sun-parlor. 

STAINES ENGLISH INLAID LINOLEUM 

unquestionably surpasses all others in beauty and wear. At PR AY'S, 
the oldest Rug House in America, Staines stocks are most complete 
and surpass in economy, as may be easily proved by comparison. 

$1.65 to $2.65 the yard 

John H. Pray & Sons Co, 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 



Have You Seen the Interior of Waltham's Up-to-Date Jewelry Store? 



S 
E 
R 

V 
I 

c 

E 




Q 

u 

A 
L 
I 

T 
Y 



THE WALTHAM JEWELRY CO. 



427 MOODY STREET 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



0\sell [eaves 

Vol. XXXXIX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., JANUARY, 1924 No. 3 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class mattei ?t the Boston. Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 





LASELL 


LEAVES STAFF '23 AND '24 




Editor-in-Chief 






Business Manager 


JOCELYN TONG 




Assistant Literary Editor 
ESTHER PALMER 


ELIZABETH FRICK 


Assistant Editor 






Local Editors 


RUTH BUFFINGTON 




Joke Editors 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 

MARIA PARRY 


ANNA HENDEE 
ELIZABETH NOWELL 


Literary Editor 






Athletic Editor 


DORIS WOODRUFF 






EDITH HADLEY 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $2.00. Single Copies, 35 cents. 

Three Alumnae Numbers, $1.00 



CONTENTS 

LITERARY 

A Legend of the Stars Mary Brill 7 

To the Good and Glory of Lasell Marie Boucher 8 

EDITORIAL 10 

THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 10 

LOCALS 11 

ATHLETICS 14 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES • 15 

MID-WINTER REUNION 15 

PERSONALS 17 

JOKES • -21 



LASELL LEAVES 




VVWWVWVVWV\\V\\\V\V\VV^V\WV . VVVV !<?^^ 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



v^-. 




A LEGEND OF THE STARS 

It was a feast time among the Indians. In 
every tribe there were peace and plenty. 
Through the warm, bright days and far into 
the frosty moonlight nights of the beautiful 
Indian summer, the men of the tribe sat 
around their camp-fire, telling tales and feast- 
ing upon the abundant food which the busy 
squaws had prepared with greatest care. Here 
and there among the wigwams ran the laugh- 
ing brown-bodied children, little girls bearing 
papooses upon their backs, and boys, too young 
to join the men, snatching such choice morsels 
as they could under the observant eyes of the 
scolding mothers. A song burst forth upon 
the air, rising from the throats of the young 
men. It proclaimed the happiness and care- 
free spirit predominant everywhere. Thus 
they bade farewell to warmth and summer 
and with a last rapturous fling, yielded to the 
on-coming days of darkness, cold and hunger. 

And now those days had come. No longer 
did the tribe feast and sing. Snow lay thick 
upon the earth and the North Wind breathed 
coldly upon the shivering Indians. But with 
the winter, worse than cold and privation, 
had come upon the unhappy tribe a terrible 
disease. Most cruelly it fell upon the little 
children. No longer did they run about in 
mischief, but, in the wigwams, lay still with 
suffering. Many had already died, and the 
wails of bereaved mothers, clasping empty 
arms to their breasts, mingled with the cries 
of pain, filled the village, and proclaimed to 
the quiet forest the tragedy of the dismal 
scene. Finally driven to desperation by the 
sorrow and loss in his tribe, the saddened old 
chief called a council of the fathers. When 



they had assembled, he spoke to them, thus : 

"Oh, brothers of my tribe, too well you 
know the dismay and terror which now reign 
over our unhappy people. It is evident that 
the Great Spirit, chief of us all, is displeased 
with us, his children. Let us fast and pray 
in sign of our repentance. For many moons 
we will refuse all food and surely the Great 
Chief will have mercy. Let us depart and 
prepare ourselves." After these words, with 
head bowed low, the chief left the council 
tent. 

It was night : darkness had veiled the 
heavens with gloom, unbroken save by the 
moon's pale glow. Down on the still earth, 
a camp-fire threw a tiny gleam upon the snow 
and a lonely wolf howled out his hatred to 
all living creatures. Around the camp-fire a 
group of Indians huddled. The blaze rose 
and fell. As it rose again, the gloom of the 
night seemed reflected in the sorrow and de- 
spair of the faces around about it. Thus 
through long nights and days filled with cries 
of anguish, the fathers of the tribe sat fasting. 
Long and sorrowful were the prayers with 
which the chief besought the Great Spirit to 
give back the hopes of the dying race, the 
little children. 

The All-seeing Chief, gazing upon the woe 
of those to whom he had given life, was 
moved with great compassion. Seeing the 
darkness of the elements which matched the 
darkness of their sorrow, he placed in the 
gloom-hidden heavens, the pure and shining 
souls of the little Indian children that they 
might lighten the path of night, as on earth, 
they had brightened the path of life. 

Mary Brill. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



TO THE GOOD AND GLORY OF 
LASELL 

The class in Americanization was quite en- 
thused: it really would be divine to do slum 
work ! Could anything be more interesting 
than an investigation of the mode of living 
of these strange, rather weird creatures called 
foreigners? They do look so picturesque and 
fascinating in the Movies with their gay 
shawls, bright skirts and odd shoes ! But 
one never can tell, for according to the Ameri- 
canization book, these people do all sorts of 
unheard-of things : they herd together in a 
little tenement (of course it must be because 
they do not know any better) ; they eat such 
funny concoctions and then it takes them ages 
to learn to speak English. Of course, it is 
the duty of every American girl to do her 
share in changing them from uncivilized aliens 
to civilized Americans. It would be so "cute" 
to dress dolls in chiffons and velvets for the 
poor dears and to bring them huge lollypops ! 
Then, too, there are those fascinating, enor- 
mous baskets it is always proper to carry 
when doing slum work ! Then there would 
be an opportunity to dance if they gave a 
"bazaar to aid the foreigners" (quite chic!). 

The bell rang, the class was dismissed, and 
a crowd of girls left the room well satisfied 
with their very generous and highly efficient 
plan for the cause of humanity. 

Just above them a homesick girl is trying 
frantically to down that awful feeling that 
comes with an overwhelming desire for 
Mother and old friends. She has been at 
Lasell exactly three months ; she thoroughly 
enjoys her classes; her roommate is dear; the 
girls of her corridor are most genial ; and yet 
she is not happy : just why she does not know, 
but any one knowing the symptoms would 
quickly tell us that Lasell spirit has not 
reached her. She is like a foreigner in a new 
land : she knows what is going on about her, 
is conscious of its strangeness but knows not 
how to change that strangeness to familiarity, 
because Lasell spirit has not reached her. She 
has read general articles on genuine Lasell 
spirit, and has heard different appeals for it ; 



she has joined in the enthusiastic songs at 
dinner, but their real significance has not 
reached her. 

She does not realize just how much of her 
mihappiness is explained when she rather sad- 
ly admits, "I have not seen my Old Girl since 
the Dance." That new girl is miserably un- 
happy because her Old Girl has forgotten to 
make Lasell spirit, a living, concrete thing. 
It is not sufficient to hold it in a gilt frame 
and extol its beauty and its fineness. It 
must be passed from year to year, from girl 
to girl, not from Leaves to Leaves and song 
to song. 

If Americanization stands for democracy, 
brotherly love and appreciation, let us do our 
Americanization work here, to the good and 
glory of Alma Mater. 

Marie Boucher. 



OCTOBER AND THE SEA 

A more perfect day could not have been 
possible, so I thought. A great desire to see 
the ocean overwhelmed me. I could imagine 
the dancing waves dazzling in the sunshine, 
but that was not enough, so slowly I made 
my way, enjoying my walk to the utmost. The 
bright chirping of the sparrows overhead, back 
and forth from tree to tree was the only 
sound. The smell of the pine woods inter- 
mingled with the fragrance of the bayberry 
leaves brought memories of approaching 
Christmas, and the smell of the sea filled the 
air. Coming to a little pond, I stood for a 
few moments by its edge, — -the picture was 
perfect. The blue of the sky with fleecy 
white clouds floating lazily around, formed 
such decided contrast to the dark green of 
the pine forest surrounding the sand. In 
the midst of all this beauty nestled a little 
hunting camp. 

Over all was the most peaceful silence and 
yet the silence spoke to me. Continually along 
the many colored sandy road, the roar of the 
ocean became more audible. A last few steps 
up the hill — and there — as far as eye could 
see, stretched the ocean and the wide expanse 
of beach. My highest expectations were real- 



LASELL LEAVES 



ized — the ocean so strong, its clear invigorat- 
ing air, its never changing ebb and flow, year 
after year, symbolic of eternal endurance, of 
patience to my impatience. Time, space, and 
all else were forgotten in the thoughts which 
everwhelmed me. Gradually, the breaking 
clouds revealed the rarest vision of beauty 
and color, the trees and all nature seemed to 
be answering to the spell, — and I realized 
what it meant to be able to behold the glory 
of the sunset. 

Gertrude Powdrell. 



CHRISTMAS VESPERS 

It was Sunday night and we had just heard 
some inspiring music and an impressive talk 
at the Christmas Vespers, at which the Glee 
Club had given groups of traditional Christ- 



mas songs. 



As we stepped out into the night, we could 
not help being glad that we were living in this 
good old world. It was a wonderful night, 
the air was crisp and smelled like snow ; the 
moon was hiding behind cloud drifts and the 
stars were shining down their joy that it was 
Christmas-tide. There was one brighter than 
all the rest which reminded us of the star that 
led the Wise Men to Bethlehem, so many 
years ago. 

As we passed by the houses we could see 
through the holly-wreathed windows, groups 
of people sitting around cozy fires, chatting; 
one group gathered about the piano was sing- 
ing carols. 

Perhaps some of us had never before real- 
ized what home means and how much it de- 
pends upon the spirit of each member of the 
family. No one seemed to note our silence 
as we walked along to Woodland, and before 
going inside we turned a few minutes to take 
in the beauty of the night and to give thanks 
for the power of receiving and radiating the 
Christmas inspiration of the Star and the 

Manger-bed. 

V. H. 



AN OLD FASHIONED GARDEN 

Beside the house, on a summer day, 

Is an old-fashioned garden, in colors gay: 

There are hollyhocks, 

And cosmos and phlox, 

Primroses, peonies, and four-o'clocks. 

The little blue-bell tinkles low, 

Under the giant golden-glow; 

And the Queen Anne's lace, 

With upturned face, 

Invites the dew from its resting place. 

A verbena nods to her poppy friend, 

A breeze sweeps the garden from end to end; 

But what do they say, 

As they rustle and sway, 

These wonderful things, as they dance and play? 

The daffodil looks to heaven afar, 

And says, "I was once a golden star; 

But one beautiful night, 

I dropped from sight, 

To come down to earth, where my friends all are. 

And every flower has a story to tell, 

Each beautiful bloom, a plan to fulfill: 

They were sent from above, 

As symbols of love, 

A message of beauty, of hope and good-will. 

E. Knight. 



A LESSON IN GRAMMAR 

Little owlet in the glen, 

I'm ashamed of you, 
You are ungrammatical 

In speaking as you do. 
You should say, to whom, to whom! 

Not to who, to who! 
Your small friend Miss Katydid 

May be green 'tis true; 
But you never heard her say, 

Katy do, she do ! 

M. R. S. 



LASELL FATE 



All our eyes are filled with hope, 

We hurry to our meal ; 
And as we near the fatal spot, 

We open our mouths and squeal. 
To-day some pass with lowered brow, 

Avoiding those looks of content, 
But yesterday those same girls smiled, 

And other's hopes were spent. 
What is this demon of Lasell, 

That makes or breaks our day, 
That fills us all with sorrow or joy? 

It's the mail box, I should say. 



I o 




C. r 





fetfor titt 



^<. 






THE NEW YEAR 

As to the small child, is a new tablet on 
which he finds his chief delight in scribbling, 
so to us is the New Year. The past is be- 
hind us with its mistakes, but what are we 
going to do with this new year that stretches 
before us ? Shall we go on in the same old 
way or shall we profit by past mistakes and 
make this year something to be proud of, 
crowded with happy hours and service for 
others? Twelve months lie ahead of us, — 
shall we make the most of them? That is a 
question that must be answered by the indi- 
vidual. New Year's Day is a time for resolu- 
tions. Many are made but few are kept ! 
Shall we make some that can be followed 
throughout this year? 

Loyalty — to friends and to Lasell. 

Pep — Let's pull together with lots of vim 
to make this the best year in the annals of 
Lasell. 

Service — The girl ready to respond to every 
call made upon her will find within herself 
sources of ability that she never before sus- 
pected. Shall we not aim to serve our friends, 
our Alma Mater, and humanity? 

For the Class of '24 the New Year marks 
the beginning of the end. Let's make the 
most of it ! For you, '25, the best of your 
years at Lasell is at hand. You are the 
Seniors of tomorrow and as such you should 
be glad to enter this new year. 

K. K. 



A WORD OF APPRECIATION 

"There shall be showers of blessings" runs 
the old song, and that delightful prophecy 
came to pass for us at this Holiday Season. 
Never were we remembered by you more 
generously with greetings and gifts. 

Dear Lasell girls and co-workers — we 
deeply appreciate your kindness. May the 
New Year be rich in blessings for you and for 
all whom you hold dear. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
Mr. and Mrs. Towne 
Lillie R. Potter. 



THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 

Invitation for Reunion 

The Lasell excursion to Intervale will come 
this year, Friday, February 15, to Monday, 
February 18. With the thought of making it 
in part a reunion of former students, a special 
invitation is extended to graduates and former 
students to join with us this year on this ex- 
cursion. 

The cost of the excursion from Auburndale 
to Auburndale will be $27. Details will be 
sent to any who desire to meet the party at the 
North Station. Reservations may be secured 
by writing Dr. Winslow. 

Mr. Bassett has placed an order for the 
usual abundant supply of snow. 
You are cordially invited. 




On Friday, November 16, the school at- 
tended at the Congregational Church, a lec- 
ture given by Miss Janet Richards of Wash- 
ington, D. C, on "Great Questions of the 
Hour from the Washington Viewpoint." She 
presented France's arguments in justification 
of her invasion and occupation of the Ruhr, 
.and some of the British and American opinions 
on the question, as well as some aspects of 
our own political circles. Most interesting 
were her personal impressions of President 
Coolidge. Her presentation of the present 
political situation gave us an excellent op- 
portunity of getting a clearer light on the per- 
plexing tangle of the average student's con- 
ception of world affairs. 

The vespers of Sunday, November 18, were 
conducted by Dr. Laurens MacLure of New- 
ton, who used as his text the old Biblical story 
of the blind man whose sight was restored by 
Christ. When he could see once more, he 
compared men to trees that walked. Dr. Mac- 
Lure said many of us are just as blind as the 
man of long ago : in our confusion of values, 
many of us do not yet know the man from the 
tree. 

November 20, 1923. 

In the afternoon Sir Robert Borden, Ex- 




SIR ROBERT BORDEN 

EX-PREMIER OF CANADA 



type, have the same ideals, and the same con- 
ception of liberty, as the American girls. Sir 
Premier of Canada, gave us a short but most Robert crossed the ocean four times during 
interesting talk. He said that the Canadian the war and has the honor of being Premier 
girls were not unlike us : they are of the same before, during, and after the war. He plainly 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



showed us that the responsibility for world 
peace rests on each one of us and that our 
service to humanity consists of living up to a 
true conception of what a great nation like 
ours means. 

Sir Robert Borden was here in Boston to 
attend the Canadian banquet and it was 
through the courtesy of Mrs. McDonald that 
we were able to hear him. 

November 21, 1923. 

Shortly after luncheon the fire gong sounded 
and instantly everyone rushed out-of-doors to 
gaze at the slender silver form of the Shenan- 
doah floating in the clear blue sky. This air 
craft is 680 feet long, would stretch from Main 
Building to the Park, has six Packard en- 
gines, each of 300 horsepower : is built of 
duralumin and is filled with helium gas : uses 
gasoline as fuel and is fire proof. Although 
it seemed to be barely moving, it was going 
at a rate of sixty miles over Boston and car- 
ried a crew of forty-four men. It is designed 
as a war auxiliary, a long distance scout for 
the battle fleet, and could easily remain aloft, 
hovering in air for three weeks. 

On the evening of November 23, Clark 
Cottage opened its doors to us for our Chris- 
tian Endeavor Meeting, led by Doris Lougee. 
Mary Stuart Ehrhart's impressive song, "My 
Task," beautifully carried out Doris' text. 
Doris spoke of our duties, our tasks, as bles- 
sings, not as unhappy destinies, and empha- 
sized how our happiness is made by respond- 
ing to the happiness of others. She closed by 
reading Henry Van Dyke's "My Task." 

December 7, 1923. 

The first formal reception of the year was 
well attended although the weather was most 
unpleasant. Dr. and Mrs. Winslow and Mr. 
and Mrs. Amesbury were in the receiving line. 
At nine o'clock a recital was held in the 
Chapel, after which refreshments were served 
in the dining-room. Girls of the different 
classes assisted in welcoming and entertaining 
the guests. 

The first Friday evening after our vacation, 
December 7, Katherine Knox led Christian 



Endeavor in Hawthorne. She spoke to us on 
Friendship — a theme that is ever welcome. 
Martha Fish played a violin selection ac- 
companied by Marie Boucher. Katherine em- 
phasized the points that are needed to be a 
friend and to have a friend. 

December 9, 1923. 

Gathered around the fire, we listened to 
Mrs. Vincent as she told of her people away 
off in India. Although they are behind us in 
many respects, they are fast learning, and al- 
ready have started a college where girls for 
the first time are learning to think for them- 
selves and to make their own decisions. They 
are being educated to go out and spread 
progressive ideas among their people, who are 
self -centered and clannish and who think and 
talk mostly of money. However, India can, 
and will learn, for ideas are fast spreading 
and it is for us, as educated people, to help 
them. 
December 12, 1923. 

The musical talent of Lasell first made its 
appearance at the Pupils' Musical Rehearsal 
held Wednesday evening in the Chapel and the 
girls showed results of long practice and ex- 
cellent training under their respective teachers, 
Mrs. Briggs, Miss Goodrich, Mrs. Lothian, 
and Mr. George Dunham. The following is 
the program : 



Piano. 


Grillen. Op. 12, No. 4 
Grace Thayer 


Schumann 


Voice. 


Allah 

Sweet Wind that Blows 

Elizabeth Irish 


Chadwick 
Chadwick 


Piano. 


The Water Lily 
The Clock 

Julia Larrabee 


MacDowell 
Kullak 


Voice. 


Scotch Pastorale 
Open thy Blue Eyes 

Elizabeth Shaw 


Saenger 

Massenet 


Piano. 


Reverie 

Ella Loewe 


Debussy 


Voice. 


To a Portrait 

Katherine Knox 


Parkyns 


Piano. 


Soiree de Vienne, D-flat 

Rosalind Winslow 


Schubert-Liszt 


Voice. 


The Passage Bird's Farewell 
Elizabeth Nowell 
Brenda Copeland 


Mendelssohn 


Piano. Romanza from Concerto in D- 
Helen Schroer 
Orchestral parts supplied on the 
Mr. George S. Dunham 


■minor Mozart 
organ by 



LASELL LEAVES 



13 



Voice. Boat Song _ Harriet Ware 

There are fairies at the bottom of our garden 

Liza Lehmann 
Virginia Warren 

Three Violins. Serenata Eichbero- 

Doris Lougee, Martha Fish, Dorothy War dwell & 

Piano. Polonaise MacDowell 

Victoria Jackson 

Voice. Lasciatemi Morire Monteverde 

Caro mio ben Giordani 

Geraldine Wilder 

Piano. First Movement, Piano Sonata Grieg 

Helen Hansen 

Voice. L'Amour s'Envole Wekerlin 

Jeunes Fillettes Wekerlin 

Phyllis Hessin 

Piano. Consolation Liszt 

Evelyn Speed 

Pianoforte Ensemble. Waltz, from La Belle au 

Bois Dormant Tschaikowsky 

Misses Schroer, Speed, Hansen, Ruth Shepard 

On Thursday, December 13, the Studio 
Christmas feast was held in the studio 
at Bragdon. Never before did the walls echo 
with more merriment, wit and Christmas joy. 
A Christmas tree loaded with mysterious 
packages, adorned one corner of the room 
and a cheerfully noisy victrola another. A 
long table with Christmas decorations was 
spread in the middle of the room. After the 
feast, toasts were proposed, but when an ear- 
nest endeavor was made to give one to Miss 
Stuart, she suddenly disappeared; and in a 
few minutes there appeared in her stead, a 
white-bearded, red-robed, rosy-cheeked Santa 
Claus, who gave each girl a beautiful child 
sketch. The floor was cleared as much as 
possible, and all danced until the bell ended 
our evening of festivity. 

On Friday, December 14, Mr. Shaw, a rep- 
resentative of the American Sugar Refining 
Company, gave us an illustrated talk on the 
growing and refining of sugar. The motion 
pictures took us from the tropical cane fields, 
through the transportation by steamship from 
Havana, and thence step by step through all 
the amazing mechanical devices in the huge 
refinery that eventually turns out the finished 
product we buy at the grocer's. 

The Christian Endeavor, Friday evening, 
was led by its president, Helen Schroer, at 
Bragdon. Miriam Smith sang a Christmas 
carol and the Senior quartet gave a selection. 



"Pep" urged us all to enter into the Christ- 
mas spirit, to be truly thankful for all the op- 
portunities which our families are giving us, 
and to show, somehow, our appreciation of all 
they are doing for our benefit. 
De)ce;mbe;r 16, 1923. 

The address of the Christmas Vespers this 
year was given by Dr. Mcllyar Lichliter. As 
is customary, the Glee Club assisted in the 
service. Dr. Lichliter told first of the origin 
of Christmas Day — how for about a hundred 
years Christ's birthday remained practically 
unknown. About December 25, the days be- 
gin to get longer, the light really conquers the 
power of darkness, and since Christ is the 
spiritual light, that day was chosen to cele- 
brate his birth. Dr. Lichliter suggested sim- 
plicity of giving in the celebration of Christ- 
mas. Let the children receive toys and let us 
all receive peace and light. Let us abolish the 
tawdry side of Christmas, the competition, the 
over-work ; and instead, let us make Christ- 
mas a day that reflects and radiates happiness 
from within. 

It is always a matter of pride to Lasell 
when our old girls make good. Edith Mc- 
Clure Patterson '02 came back to her school 
home a stranger to most of us. Through her 
entertaining and valuable talk on "The Bud- 
get," she made enthusiastic friends of the new 
girls. 

Mrs. McClure followed her talk on Eco- 
nomics with a delightful, illustrated lecture on 
her recent travels in foreign lands. She has 
made such signal success through her effi- 
ciency in her chosen profession, the Women's 
Clubs of the United States have tendered her 
the important office of "Home Budget Spe- 
cialist" for the General Federation of Wo- 
men's Clubs. Lasell wishes her Godspeed. 

We regret that through an error, it was 
announced in these columns last month that 
Phyllis Hessin was the president of the Mis- 
sionary Society. The President is Katherine 
Webb, who, we are sure, may depend upon 
the hearty co-operation of all of us. 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



GARDNER STUNT NIGHT 

With a drawn curtain, shrieks, stampings, 
squeals, rows of expectant faces and an atmos- 
phere of jovial merriment, you have Gardner 
Stunt Night. The audience impatiently clam- 
ors for the "show" to begin. It does. Gardner 
girls, formed in a line across the stage, hila- 
riously sing their opening song in the form of 
a hearty welcome from "Miss Potter's sweet 
doves in disguise." After this overture, a sign 
informs us that we are about to see the "inside 
workings" of Senior room. As the curtain rolls 
back, we see a familiar sight, and we must 
confess, hear familiar sounds. A stampeding 
mob riots its way across the stage. It is a case 
of every one for herself. Gym excuses are 
shouted for ; Spanish books, writing paper and 
pencils are in demand. The scene that follows 
is most familiar. Wit, "wise-cracks," Spanish 
and. letters are in the air. We enthusiastically 
show our liking for the first act. 

Gardner's musical talent was very evident. 
Mary O'Hare sang "Just the Girl That Men 
Forget," and we had trouble in keeping our- 
selves from joining in. The bewitching trio 
in green, Jumpy Norris, Helen Strifert and 
Mary O'Hare, gave us "I Love You," the 
song dear to every Lasell girl's heart, and 
"Faded Love Letters." This last was brought 
out splendidly by the presence of letters (we 
doubt whether they were faded, — from where 
we sat the stamps looked fairly new — as for 
the "love letter" part, — well, we won't discuss 
that) in the hands of the singers. Gardner's 
Jazz Band was next and at first we were 
rather puzzled as to where the noise came 
from — when only Pep Schroer, Honey Perry 
and Lydia Parry were visible. The mystery 
was explained when the rest of gay Gardner 
appeared, combs in hand, to play an amazing 
accompaniment to the original dance executed 
by Lydia Parry dressed picturesquely in a 
yellow slicker. (We must not forget the 
violin.) We think no one can sing "On the 
Back Porch" better than Lydia. 

The final act on the marvelous program was 
a presentation of "Orphans of the Storm," in 



which Mary O' Hare, Helen Strifert, Frances 
Badger, Lydia Parry and Gertrude Wragg 
figured prominently as "leads." The rest of 
Gardner helped by being the mob. Then 
came the farewell song, which invited to stay 
and dance. We did and it was unanimously 
voted that we liked Gardner Stunt Night and 
that therefore it was a grand success. 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

The Hockey season closed with a very suc- 
cessful game on November 10, when the team 
went to Radcliffe to play the Freshmen. The 
game was a very exciting one and ended in a 
score of i-o. The only goal of the game was 
scored by Victoria Jackson. The players for 
Lasell were : 

R. Wing— R. Voltz 

R. Inner— E. Fairchild, M. Brill 

Center — E. Hadley 

L. Inner — E. Robbins 

L. Wing — B. Cushing 

R. Half— V. Jackson 

C. Half — B. Saxton 

L. Half — B. Kotzen, F. Finney 

R. Full— D. Redman 

L. Full— R. Buffington 

Goal — F. Badger 

Basket-ball has started and we hope to have 
a very successful year. We cannot have it un- 
less everyone who is interested in the game 
will come out and- try to make her team bring 
honors to her class. Give the teams your 
hearty support and there is no doubt but that 
we shall have a good season. 



THE CHRISTMAS SLAM DINNER 

Christmas, Christmas everywhere — as we 
entered the dining-room at Main and Wood- 
land Christmas Slam Night, miniature snow- 
drifts, reindeer tugging at scarlet, holly cov- 
ered sleighs, a cozy fire-place hung with stock- 
ings, dazzling trees, bells, candles, holly, 
mistletoe, poinsettias — all showed the origi- 
nality, ingenuity, and artistic ability of Lasell 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



girls in decorating the tables for the annual 
Christmas feast just before leaving for home 
for the holiday recess. 

The usual merriment occasioned by poking 
fun at everyone's characteristic failing by 
the presentation of slams and demanding of 
stunts, interspersed with groups of songs by 
the Glee Club, Seniors, Spanish class and cer- 
tain individuals, and the table skits which ac- 
companied the delicious feast, made the mad 
and merry evening one long to be remembered. 



MID-WINTER REUNION 

The President of the Alumnae Association 
and Committee have again accepted Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow's invitation to come back to 
the old school home and have fixed on the 
second Monday in February as the date. 

Our President, who had a unique experi- 
ence this past summer in Labrador, has prom- 
ised to tell us a little about it. This opportu- 
nity of "coming home" as the guest of the 
Seminary and renewing old friendships will, 
as usual, insure a large and enthusiastic at- 
tendance. 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

Nov. 14. Frances Robertson, of the 9th 
Grade, entertained the members of her class 
on her birthday. Such a wonderful birth- 
day cake ! The girls say it is all right to 
make a great deal of noise when there are 
two teachers at the party! 

Nov. 17-18. Miss Ida M. Bunting spent the 
week-end visiting her old school. Miss 
Bunting was resident pianoforte teacher at 
Woodland Park 1919-1922. 

Nov. 18. We were glad to welcome Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Amesbury and little Virginia 
at our Sunday tea-hour. 

Nov. 19. Mrs. Towne's birthday is an event 
of interest to the Junior School. One of 
our traditions is to have the pleasure of 
greeting Mrs. Towne with a procession of 
flowers. After singing a birthday greeting 
from the dining-room entrance, the girls 
pass Mrs. Towne's table, each presenting a 



flower as she passes. May Mrs. Towne 
have many happy returns of this — her day ! 
Nov. 20. Dancing lessons began for the sea- 
son under the efficient direction of Mrs. 
Wm. McConnell. We are having courses 
in aesthetic and folk dancing. 

Nov. 20. Miss Potter dined with the Junior 
School and met the teachers and girls 
after dinner in our living room. We can 
wish nothing better for our girls than even- 
tually to come under the fine influence that 
Mis? Potter throws around all who have 
the privilege of her training. 

Nov. 21. Dr. Winslow and Mrs. McDonald 
went to Boston on Wednesday morning, 
Nov. 21, and were received by the Rt. Hon. 
Sir Robert Laird Borden, G. C. M. G., of 
Ottawa, Canada. At 11 A. M. they accom- 
panied Sir Robert and the President of the 
Canadian Club of Boston to the State House 
for a private audience with Gov. Cox. Sir 
Robert then accompanied Dr. Winslow and 
Mrs. McDonald to Woodland Park, where 
luncheon was served. They were joined at 
luncheon by Mrs. Winslow, Mr. and Mrs. 
Towne, Miss Potter, Miss Hemmeon, 
Gwendolyn McDonald and Preble Borden. 
After luncheon, Sir Robert visited the class- 
rooms of Woodland Park School and then 
proceeded to Bragdon Hall — where he ad- 
dressed the assembled schools in the 
Chapel. 

Sir Robert Borden is an Ex-Premier of 
Canada and a member of the Privy Council 
of England, — he was a Member of the 
Peace Conference at Paris — and also Dis- 
armament Conference at Washington, D. C, 
and is a very strong advocate of the League 
of Nations. 

After his address, Sir Robert held a short 
reception, wishing to meet the teachers of 
Lasell and Woodland Park and also the 
Canadian members of the school. Sir 
Robert expressed himself as delighted with 
the spirit and personnel of our schools. 
Nov. 28. Mr. and Mrs. Himelhoch of De- 
troit called, and took their daughter Mar- 
jean to spend Thanksgiving in Boston. 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



Nov. 28. Miss Florence Gertrude Perkins, a 
former teacher at Lasell, spent Thanks- 
giving at Woodland Park and Lasell. 

Dec. 1. The girls who spent Thanksgiving 
Recess at Woodland Park went to Welles- 
ley Community Theatre to see "Lorna 
Doone." They were chaperoned by Miss 
Hemmeon. 

Dec. 4. Another birthday cake ! Jean Good- 
rich — all of 6 years old — had a birthday 
party in Mrs. McDonald's room, after 
dinner, and entertained the little girls of 
the 1st, 2nd and 3rd grades. 

DECEMBER 7— PUPILS' RECITAL 

1. Group of songs 

Children's Chorus 

2. Criss Cross Nathaniel Hyatt 

Helen Jane Burke 

3. The Clock Maxim 

Jean Goodrich 

4. Waltz Bilbro 

Mary Elizabeth Keever 

5. (a.) Cradle Song 

(b) Lullaby Adams 

Priscilla Winslow 

6. Duet : Cheerful and Contented Low 

Denice Lamont, Mrs. Goodrich 

7. Cricket and the Bumble-bee Chadwick 

Mar jean Himelhoch 

8. (a) The Merry-go-round Bilbro 
(b) A Song 

Gloria Wilcox 

9. The Merry Farmer Schumann 

Huldah Stanton 

10. Catch Me If You Can Schmitt 

Bertha Root 

11. Spinning Song Ellmenreich 

Betty Wilcox 

12. Trilleto Florence Goodrich 

Norma Lambert 

13. Blue Danube Waltz Strauss 

Lucy Bene jam 

14. (a) Slumber Song Schumann 
(b) Water Lilies 

Woodland Park Chorus 

15. Scherzo Schumann 

Gertrude Curtis 

16. Scarf Dance Chaminade 

Mona Towle 

17. Elegie Massenet 
Dorothy Smith, Marjorie Winslow, Gwendolyn 

McDonald — Violins 

Frances Robertson — Cello 

Katherine Braithwaite — Piano 

18. The Witch McDowell 

Frances Rickey 

19. The Butterfly Merkel 

Marjorie Winslow 

20. Barchetta Nevin 

Katherine Braithwaite 

21. (a) Pienette Chaminade 
(b) Etude Wollenhaupt 

Gwendolyn McDonald 

22. Song — March of Triumph Nevin 

Woodland Park Chorus 



Dec. 9. Accompanied by Mrs. McDonald, a 
group of our girls went to Watertown to 
hear the choir of the Perkins Institute for 
the Blind, sing Christmas Carols. 

Dec. 15. A delightful Saturday evening! 
The younger groups of girls had a marsh- 
mallow roast in the living room, while the 
older girls made and filled Christmas stock- 
ings for our Annual Christmas Tree! 

Dec. 16. Christmas Sunday at Lasell, and 
in the afternoon Woodland Park Christmas 
Vespers. The candle procession was led this 
year by Frances Rickey, dressed in crimson 
and carrying high a large brass candelabra 
holding seven tall lighted red candles. The 
procession consisted of all the pupils of 
Woodland Park, dressed in white and 
carrying lighted red candles. The program 
was as follows : 

Processional 

God Rest ye, Merry Gentlemen 

The Meaning of the Star 

Norma Lambert 

Carols — ■ 

Away in a Manger 
We Three Kings of Orient Are 
Scripture Reading 

Dr. George S. Butters 
Carol — 

It Came Upon the Midnight Clear 
Address — 

Dr. Butters 
Carols — 

Come, Come to the Manger 
The First Noel 
Prayer — Dr. Butters 
Carol — Silent Night 
Benediction 

Mary Elizabeth Keever 

Dec. 17. All girls above the 4th grade at- 
tended the Dramatic Recital at Bragdon 
Hall. 

Dec. 19. School closed for the Christmas 
Holidays with the Annual Christmas tree 
party. The tree was trimmed the night be- 
fore by the girls of the 8th and 9th Grades. 
We were glad to welcome many parents and 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



friends who came to share our Christmas 
spirit. The following program was pre- 
sented : 

1. Christmas Pageant — 

Arranged by Hazel Lawrence and 
Ruth Rowbotham 

2. Carol — It Came Upon the Midnight Clear. 

3. The Meaning of the Star. 

Norma Lambert 

4. Carols — 

Come to the Manger 

5. Christmas Legend Dramatized 

6. Carol — 

Silent Night 

7. Benediction 

Mary Elizabeth Keever 
Christmas Stockings and corn balls were 
then distributed by the girls of the Junior 
High School to the children of the lower 
school. 



for disturbing her nest. On my walk I also 
found a purple fringed orchid growing in a 
swampy place where a beaver had once built 
his dam. 

I stood on a small island and watched the 
first yellow rim of the moon rise above the 
black silhouette of the trees and shed a single 
ray of light to be caught and reflected in the 
lake. The moon rose higher and the paths 
of moonlight spread and widened until it 
clothed the island and myself in the pale sheen 
of moonlight. As I stood and gazed on this 
beautiful sight, listening to the whispering 
trees, the faint peep of the sand piper, and the 
whistling of the whip-poor-will, from far off 
came also the faint weird laughter of the loon 
echoing across the water, and a sense of help- 
lessness in comprehending the marvelous 
beauty of the scene came over me. 

Frances Robertson. 



TWO WALKS 

The day was warm, but a cool dampness 
still clung where the sun had not pierced the 
heavy foliage. It gives me such a wonderful 
feeling to walk in a virgin forest that the axe 
of man has never touched, to think of the tales 
the old hemlocks, birches, pines and spotted 
maples could tell of the graceful deer, the 
bears and the foxes that pass, of the coon 
that climbs to sleep all day in the hollow of 
the tree, and the squirrels that run and jump 
and chatter the whole day through. Even as 
I stood thinking, a tiny chipmunk with his 
pretty striped coat, came from his hole in the 
ground not far from my feet. Over my head 
the drum, drum of a downy woodpecker 
sounded and the chirp of a bird calling to his 
mate. I walked along the edge of a small 
lake and there I discovered the prints of deer 
hoofs and the marks of a coon that came to 
get fresh water clams. I could picture the 
majestic deer as he came cautiously from the 
wood at dawn for a drink at the edge of the 
lake. I was about to push over an old stump 
when I heard a scurry and two bright eyes 
peeped over the edge. They belonged to a 
red squirrel that at once began to scold me 




A happy New Year to all Lasell girls, but 
most especially here and now to the brides 
and grooms whose wedding announcements 
follow. 

On November the twenty-eighth, Ruth 
Sarah Throm '23 was united in marriage to 
Mr. George Welliver Rogers. 

December the fourth was the wedding day 
of Helen Pope (1912-15) and Mr. Gaylord 
George Cummings. After January first, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cummings will be at home at New- 
port, New Hampshire. 

Katharine G. Bingaman T5 and Mr. John 
Heron were married at Plainfield, New Jersey, 
Thursday, the twentieth day of December. 

In a kind personal note to our Principal 
from Sarah Dyer Darling (1900-01) she ex- 



P- 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



pressed regret that Mrs. Winslow was absent 
from the Connecticut Valley reunion and 
closes with regards to Mrs. Winslow, Made- 
moiselle LeRoyer, Miss Potter, and Miss 
Witherbee, adding, "She may not remember 
me, but my thoughts of her and remembrances 
are most friendly." Miss Witherbee was 
pleased to receive this kind message and re- 
members this "old girl" most distinctly. 

Margaret Bullock '23 took time in the midst 
of her busy life to send a charming message 
to Senora Orozco. She had a most worthy 
word to say about a Christmas party which 
she and some of her friends were to give to 
some needy settlement children and is also 
planning to do something for the children in 
the hospital. She closes with love to Miss 
Potter and Miss Witherbee. I wish I could 
reveal Margaret's pleasant personal plan for 
Senora. But no ! That's supposed to be kept 
for the present. 

That was a dainty card which Mary Hoke 
Lesh '21 sent to us, on which was engraved 
the name of Perry Wilkens Lesh, Junior, born 
October 31, 1923. 

On November the twenty-third, a little 
daughter, Jane, was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Ormrod Titus (Margaret Williams '11 ). 

Little Harriet Jane, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. C. A. Pollard (Marion Owen '19), came 
to gladden their home on November 27. 

Lasell extends a loving welcome to these 
dear little pilgrims. 

Congratulations are in order to Margaret 
Chapman (1920-21) who has recently an- 
nounced her engagement to Byron Cook. 

This is indeed a world of change. Dr. 
Winslow, a short time ago, heard from Myra 
Tomlinson (1916-17) formerly of Canada, 
now of 948 Deane Avenue, Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. She asks in her letter for the address 
of our former instructor in Art, Miss Mulli- 
ken. We give below Miss Mulliken's ad- 
dress, believing that many others will be glad 
to have it. Miss Mary A. Mulliken, c.o. E. 
K. Lowry, 23 Elgin Terrace, Tientsin, China. 
Myra tells us that Helen Early, who was in 
the preparatory class in 1916-17, is one of her 



neighbors. Helen's address is Box 331, Ven- 
ice, California. Myra assures Dr. Winslow 
that she has a good position but does not tell 
just what it is. Her good wishes for the New 
Year are cordially reciprocated. 

The Harvard- Yale game brought Marion 
Beach '16 and Eleanor McCarthy '16 to Bos- 
ton and very properly to Lasell, only they did 
not stay long enough. 

Norma MacMillan Sisson (1914-18) 
brought with her, her fine looking husband. 
Those of us who had the pleasure of meeting 
Mr. Sisson adopted him at once into our 
Lasell family. 

Lydia Adams '18, Barbara McLellan '18, 
and Katherine Forgie Holman '20 came to 
Lasell together and kindly remained to break 
bread with us. We were delighted to receive 
these dear girls but extremely pained to learn 
of the recent passing away of Barbara's 
mother. 

t From Evergreen Park Farm, Virginia, Illi- 
nois, there came recently to our Principal an 
interesting and touching letter written by 
Nadine Robertson Campbell in which she tells 
of the death of her sister, Nelle Robertson 
(1896-98). "Nelle enlisted as a Young 
Women's Christian Association secretary, was 
in Marseilles and did wonderful work there. 
Later she was stricken with fever from which 
she did not recover and was buried in Mar- 
seilles, but her later resting-place was in one 
of our war cemeteries near Paris. We re- 
ceived such excellent letters from the war 
officers telling of her good work among the 
boys. The churches in Virginia, Illinois, 
dedicated a room in the new Wesley Memorial 
Building at Champaign, in memory of her. 
Dr. Bragdon was the head of the school when 
she was at Lasell. I am sure he will remem- 
ber her." Lasell takes the privilege, at this 
late day, of extending tender sympathy to this 
sister and to the bereaved family and will re- 
member with comfort and pride Nelle's splen- 
did record in the Great War. 

Among the Lasell girls of former times 
there has come to us, recently, word of the 
passing away of Jessie Vilas Miller '92, Sarah 



LASELL LEAVES 19 

Corse Tougas '57, and Susan Cook Ballon Nickleson '17 and Evelyn Cate Gatchell (1916- 

'64. Lasell's tender sympathy is extended to 17). 

the bereaved families of these dear "old girls." From Saginaw, Michigan, 402 S. Jefferson 

Mabel Gleason '23 recently returned for a Avenue, Eloise Carey '20 writes, "I had 

real visit and seemed to be as glad to be at thought to go back to New England before 

Lasell as Lasell was glad to have her home this, but shall not until June. I do miss you 

again. so much. Am teaching voice here and doing 

Mrs. Lucy Tappan Scott, former instructor lots of singing, so I'm very busy." Our con- 

at Lasell, is still interested in philanthropic gratulations to Eloise on her success ; and her 

and mission work. A recent copy of the desire to be with us is warmly reciprocated. 

Pasadena Daily contains an appeal from her l n Miss Edith Williams' Christmas message, 

for the benefit of the stricken Japanese. s he tells us of a most satisfactory visit she 

Bella Jacobs was made glad recently by a had recently with Frances Dolley. Of Miss 

visit from her mother, Mrs. A. S. Jacobs of Dolley she writes, "She hasn't changed one bit 

El Paso, Texas. in seven vears." This is °ood news when we 

Miss Potter received a call, a short time think of Miss Dolley's strenuous life, for she 

ago, from her former classmate and room- now has a full program as a Professor in 

mate, Mrs. Silas Pierce (Annie Kendig '80) Home Economics in the Western Reserve Uni- 

who for the present is the guest of her daugh- versity at Cleveland. Incidentally we are 

ter, Mrs. Theodore Bittenbender of Brookline. pleased to report that the friends of Miss Wil- 

We understand Mrs. Pierce is planning to liams have a good word to say of her splendid 

spend the winter months in Florida. work in her state university. 

We are indebted to Elizabeth Johnson for Among the gracious acts of our Senior 

giving us the pleasant word that Doris San- Class at Christmastide was that of sending 

born '21 is now a full fledged teacher in the to the school faculty hearty good wishes for 

Normal School at Lowell. the New Year. 

Cornelia Hemingway '22, now president of In a note from Ruth Throm Rogers '23 to 

the Connecticut Valley Lasell Club, is respon- our Principal, she has a friendly word con- 

sible for sending to our Principal the good cerning Margaret Runyeon of Reading, Penn- 

word that Caroline Bovey '22 is at present sub- sylvania, who is to be one of our new girls in 

stituting as head dietitian in the New Haven the second semester. Ruth promises to be 

Hospital. Cornelia thoughtfully sent a com- with us in June. Her good wishes for the 

plete list of her club members. New Year are appreciated. 

We are grateful to Doris Campbell Jeschke Florence Gifford '23 is still in Pasadena and 

'20 for giving us her correct name. A mis- from that delightful region she sends a long 

take was made in the Register of Graduates, "homey" letter to our Miss Wright. She and 

Classmates and friends take notice! In her her parents were three weeks on the journey 

note she tells us that Helene Westervelt from Evanston to California enjoying all the 

Thielens '20 is now on a honeymoon trip wonderful "show sights," en route, which in- 

around the world. Katherine Rice and Lillian eluded Albuquerque and the Grand Canyon. 

Doane attended the wedding, Lillian being They are keeping up their sight-seeing and 

bridesmaid. drive daily to some interesting place. Flor- 

Annie Dimond Day '18 sends us her new ence describes her home as surrounded with 

address along with her Christmas Greetings, — palm trees and beautiful roses, and from her 

77 Congress Avenue, Providence, R. I. She description it is, "Roses, roses, all the way," 

says also that Mildred Smith Leach '14 is plan- in Pasadena. Florence's letter contained a 

ning to come with her to the Lasell February bit of interesting news of "Chink" Fuller '23. 

Luncheon and that she often sees Alice Jencks She is at home helping her Mother, but is 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



rather planning to come to Boston after the 
New Year to start a business career. "Dell" 
Smith is in the University of Indiana and has 
been pledged Kappa Alpha Theta. She also 
referred to the engagement of Evelyn Shidler 
'23 but did not give the name of the fortunate 
man. 

We are indebted also to our dear Miss 
Wright for sharing with us a message from 
Catharine Howe '22 who is still in charge of 
the Athletic Department at Penn Hall, Cham- 
bersburg, Penn. She writes, "I think often 
of our year at Gardner and what fun we had 
and of how we enjoyed being your girls for 
that year." Catharine closes with, "I cannot 
wait to get the Leaves and see what is going 
on at school," and she properly follows that 
remark by enclosing her annual subscription. 
Our congratulations and best wishes are al- 
ways extended to our Catharine. 

Beulah Coward Bresee (1915-18), although 
a busy mother and home-maker, finds time 
for some worth-while church work. She 
dropped in the other day and spoke enthusias- 
tically of her splendid Bible Class of twenty- 
one young women. She is also head of the 
Cradle Roll of her Sabbath School. Beulah's 
husband, Mr. C. Douglas Bresee, is the suc- 
cessful superintendent of this Sabbath School, 
one of the largest in greater Boston. 

Certainly one of the most "homey" and 
friendly letters which we have had the priv- 
ilege of reading, was the one to Miss Wright 
from Elsie Bigwood Cooney (1917-18). She 
writes such a sunshiny letter and her especial 
cause for such scintillation is a certain dar- 
ling baby. Elsie's little Marietta is a year old 
and of course is one of the dearest babies that 
ever lived. Elsie is brimming over in her en- 
thusiasm and from her cheery letter seems to 
be surrounded with devoted friends and rela- 
tives. Elsie's letter contained a very cordial 
invitation to Miss Wright to become her guest. 
The rest of us at Lasell take this opportunity 
of urging Elsie to come home to our school 
soon, and how charmed we would be if she 
brought with her, the dear baby and Mr. 
Cooney. 



Christmas tide at Lasell this year was, as 
usual, a season of good will and cheer. On 
Christmas Day, through the generous courtesy 
of Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, some sixty little 
Lasell children of our co-workers made merry 
around a beautiful Christmas tree in front of 
the great open fire in the chapel. Mrs. Wins- 
low was master of ceremonies and as one of 
the grown-ups said, "The impromptu program 
furnished by these dear children was the most 
delightful feature of the Christmas Day." 

As the guests at Bragdon entered the dining- 
room, the sound of a trio of violins greeted 
them. The little artists were Marjorie and 
Donald Winslow and Gwendolyn McDonald. 
They were playing the hymn, "Joy to the 
World! the Lord Has Come," and later the 
entire company joined in the singing of this 
Christmas song. We learned, too, that a part 
of our family was entertained at Woodland 
where many delightful surprises were planned 
by Mrs. Towne. The good cheer was at its 
height when we all met together around the 
chapel fireside in historic Bragdon. Those of 
us who were privileged to be guests in the 
dear school home wish to express our grati- 
tude and appreciation for this very Merry 
Christmas which came largely through the 
generous thought fulness of our Principal and 
his wife. 

One of the Christmas surprises for Mr. and 
Mrs. Wagner was the coming home of their 
older son, Mr. Charles Wagner, and his fam- 
ily. 

Those of us who were favored in receiving 
Christmas cards from Ruth Ordway '21 were 
delighted to discover that they were of her 
own designing. We congratulate the artist 
and the recipients. 

Miss Clementina Butler '80 was the guest of 
the school at the Christmas Vespers. She 
brought with her a little Japanese student, who 
later charmed the people in the Methodist 
Church by her plea for the stricken Japanese. 

Mr. Ordway tells us that on Christmas Eve 
he went with a group of carol singers, his own 
little David being one of them, to sing to the 
sick at the Newton Hospital, and while there 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



met one of our Lasell girls, Esther H. Storey 
'21, who is now in training" as a nurse. 

We were grieved to learn recently of the 
passing away of Georgianna Pillsbury Dwinal 
'69. Lasell extends tender sympathy to this 
bereaved family. 

Beulah MacFarlane '20 sends greetings to 
her Lasell friends through Miss White, who 
is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ordway. Beulah is 
now teaching in the grade schools at Bur- 
lington, Vt. 

Among the most prized of the New Year 
Greetings which came to Lasell folks, was the 
card from our Principal Emeritus, Dr. and 
Mrs. Bragdon. Lasell sends back her 
heartiest good wishes for the New Year. 

Along with Helen Webster's '19 Christmas 
Card, came this personal word, "I think of 
Lasell a great deal. Am busy working in 
Northeastern College Bookstore in the Y. M. 
C. A., Boston. Am also studying voice with 
Lasell's most talented singer, Miss Gertrude 
Tingley." This recalls to our minds Miss 
Tingley's recent recital in Boston, of which 
Philip Hale, prominent musical critic, spoke 
in highest terms. Lasell's congratulations to 
Gertrude and success to her Lasell pupil. 



JOKES 

Privileges — Something all Seniors have ( ?) 
but few retain. 

Study Hall — A torture chamber on Monday 
mornings. 

Shorthand — A sign language that is one 
step lower than Chinese. 

Room-mate — Something we all have but 
seldom see. 

Brains — Something spoken of in awe. 

Telephone — An instrument situated in a 
mob scene. 

Corridor teacher — One who should know 
where you are (and usually does). 

Boston — Ambition of early Monday morn- 
ing shopper. 

Class — A place of dreams — or night-mares. 

Mail (or male) — A school girl's prayer. 

Telephone calls — Public sentiment. 



Telegrams — Miss Potter's "Cosmopolitan." 

That Red-head Gal — K. Brown. 

When You Walk Out, Someone Else Walks 
In — Dr. Winslow's office. 

Oh, Helen, Please Be Mine — F. Badger. 

All Muddled Up— Juniors. 

Runnin' Wild — Sophomore election. 

Morning Will Come — One Sunday night. 

Fuzzy Wuzzy — Glenna Bullis. 

Dusting the Keys — Pep Schroer. 

1, 2, 3, 4, Sometimes I Wish There Were 
More — Jessie Matteson. 

Little Rover — Patty Berkson. 

When Will I Know? — Classifications. 

A Perfect (???) Day — November fifth. 

Aggravatin' Papa — No Check. 



NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS! FRAGILE! DO 
NOT BREAK! 

Frances Badger — I resolve to refrain from 
breaking my watch. 

Gert Westerhoff — I resolve to wear a hair 
net. 

Pep Schroer — I resolve not to wear a hair 
net. 

J. Tong — I resolve to stop chewing gum. 

Edith Hadley — I resolve to stop whining. 

Marge Aitken — I resolve to stay off restric- 
tions. 

Mary O'Hare — I resolve to limit myself to 
one telephone call a week. 

Jumpy Norris — I resolve to pass Spanish. 

Ruth Buffington — I resolve to get acquainted 
with the Seniors. 

Patty Berkson — I resolve to be a dignified 
angel. 

Bobby Niday — I resolve not to express my- 
self forcibly. 

Louise Titus — I resolve to argue each point 
in Bible. 

Virginia Stevens — I resolve to go to Leland 
Powers. 



REVEALING RHYMES 

With her you can have loads of fun, 
Somehow all our hearts she has won. 
With a good word for all, 
Juniors come at her call. 
Why, she's our Jessie Matteson. 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



Sally Barnum, a few lines to you, 

To praise you in all that you do. 

You're the kind of a gal, 

Who, to all, is a pal. 

Right on tap — you'll always come through. 

Lib Anderson, she has a way all her own, 

And our feelings for her sure have grown ; 

Now wherever she's seen, 

She just seems to beam, 

Why, that smile is an asset alone. 

There is one in this motley throng, 
A girl whom we call Jocelyn Tong; 
Right straight through each week, 
She becomes more unique. 
For her, we've always been strong. 

There's a girl here whom we like to fuss, 

Because of her violent blush. 

Frances Bliss, it is said, 

Can surely turn red. 

So to her for bright color we'll rush. 

There's Miss Belber whose first name is Lee, 

Who's noted for being so wee ! 

But for one who's so small, 

She steps on us all. 

She's a mind of her own, as you see. 



Trolley lines to Boston sure are gorgeous, 
Steamship lines that take me home are sweet; 
But the line that gets for me a weekend, 
Is the one that makes my life complete. 



"What an awful life!" the Junior cried, 
As that moment a Senior she espied; 
"Now I'll have to wait and let her pass, 
For she's a member of the Senior class." 

"What an awful life !" the Senior wailed, 
As into view a Junior sailed ; 
"Setting an example is really absurd, 
I'd much rather be of the common herd." 



Epitaph for a London boarding-house 
keeper : 

"Peace to her h'ashes." 



"Father, did God make me?" 
"Yes, my child." 
"And did He make you, too?" 
"Yes." 

"Well, He's doing better work now, isn't 
He?" 



Flo — "Joe, what is a caterpillar?" 
Joe — "It's an upholstered worm." 



"Why do so much darning, daughter?" 
"Runs in the family." 



Conductor — "Fare, please." 
French Student (absent mindedly)- 
faisant, fis." 



'Faire, 



Man (in search of wife) — "Bridget, do you 
know anything of my wife's whereabouts?" 

Bridget — "Yes, sir, I just put them in the 
wash." 



The Judge : "This lady says you tried to 
speak to her at the station." 

Student : "It was a mistake. I was look- 
ing for my roommate's girl whom I had never 
seen before but who'd been described to me 
as a handsome blond with classic features, 
fine complexion, perfect figure, beautifully 
dressed and " 

The Witness : "I don't care to prosecute the 
gentleman. Anyone might have made the 
same mistake." 



"Isn't there some fable about the ass dis- 
guising himself with a lion's skin?" 

"Yes, but now colleges do the trick with 
a sheepskin." 



DAINTY CAKES 

Your cookies, jumbles, drop and 
layer cakes will be delicious if you 
use RUMFORD, the wholesome 
Baking Powder. It imparts to 
cake and hot breads that delicacy 
of texture and flavor sought for by 
all good cooks. Make tomorrow's 
cake with 



RUMFORD 

The Wholesome 

BAKING POWDER 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



Miss Wright (at the table) : "When I 
found I was late, I put on my dress and flew." 

"We wonder, Miss Wright, just what is a 
'flew'." 



"Life is real, life is earnest, 
We must strive to do our best, 
And departing leave behind us, 
Note books that will help the rest." 



Porter: "How would you like to sleep — 
head first or feet first?" 

Voyager: "If it's all the same to you, I 
will sleep all at the same time." 



Stude Cou : "I saw you whispering in 
Chapel this morning." 

Dumb-bell : "Ha, Ha ! That's a joke on 
you — I didn't go to Chapel." 



"Mandy, did you sweep under the carpet?" 
"Yes, Missus Jones, I sweeps everything 
under this 'ere carpet." 



Co-ed: "He will get his degree this 
spring." 

Co-edna : "Yes, and after he gets a few 
more degrees he will be nearly up to zero." 



"Won't you. come into my parlor?" 
Said the spider to the fly. 

"Parlor noth', getta flivver !" 
Was the modern fly's reply. 



JUNIOR ENGLISH 
Spot the following passage in Shakespeare: 
1. "Mary had a little lamb, its fleece was 

white as snow, and everywhere that Mary 

went, the lamb was sure to go." 



2. "Is this poetry? If so, why? Whose? 
When? Where? Explain in detail." 

3. "What sentiment is indicated? How 
would the same idea have been expressed by 
(a) Moses? (b) Caesar? (c) Woodrow Wil- 
son? (d) W. J. Bryan? (e) yourself?" 

All students who graduate from Lasell Seminary should 
patronize 

HOPKINSON & HOLDEN 

for COOKING UTENSILS 

of all kinds suitable for homes, schools and colleges. 
Their goods are reasonable and the quality excellent. 

14-15-16-17 Faneuil Hall Square 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Congress 5325 



J. W. GERRY COMPANY 

WALL PAPERS 

63 Franklin Street 

Boston, Mass- 

Elizabeth Candy Shops 

316 Moody Street 108 Main Street 

Waltham Gardner 

Massachusetts 

When in either of the above Cities 

you will find delightful refreshments 

at our Shops 

Sandwiches and Hot Drinks, 
Ice Cream, Ice Cream Sodas, 
Sundaes, Milk Drinks, etc. in 
Various Flavors. Also Salted 
Nuts, Chocolates, Caramels and 
a large assortment of Candies — 
Made in our Shops 



Novelties for the Different Holidays 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



That 

Fascinating 
Place I 



(3 



(Eompang 




Why tramp all over town looking for clever 
and unusual things when you can do the 
most of your choosing all in one place ? 

From the far places of the earth we have 
brought gifts for your approval. 

May we show them to you? 

Qift Shop — Seventh Floor — Annex 




BAKERS 

Sweet Chocolate 

Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 




■bBmb^e- ; - .::. -.■fa i\a:im 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Now Showing 

Clever Styles 

in 

Slim Line Apparel 



Fashionable Blouses 

and 

Pretty Sweaters 

Clifford S. Cobb Company 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



T. O. Metcalf Company 

PRINTERS 

Uc signers ptfO|j hngravers 

152 Purchase Street Boston 

TELEPHONE CONGRESS 3820 



WILL C. EDDY, AUBURNDALE 



SHATTUCK& JONES 



FRESH 



INCORPORATED 



FISH 



CURED 



128 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 



PHOTOGRAPHER FOR LASELL 



Ye Craftsman Studio 



561 Boylston Stieet 
Boston, Mass. 

Tel. Back Bay 7040 



599 Massachusetts Ave. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Tel. University 3642 



BURDITT & WILLIAMS CO. 
builders HARDWARE general 

Mechanics' Tools, Automobile Sundries, Electrical 
Appliances, Fine Cutlery 

160 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON 
Telephone Congress 6690 



PHONE CONGRESS 835 

RICHARD E. THIBAUT 

INCORPORATED 

PEERLESS WALL PAPERS 

Largest Wall Paper House in the World 

93 FEDERAL STREET 

Near Franklin Street 



NEW YORK 
BROOKLYN 



BOSTON 



BRONX 

NEWARK 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



SAMUEL HOLMES J. FREDERICK HOLMES 

FRANK W. HOLMES 



SAMUEL HOLMES, INC. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



POULTRY AND GAME 



Stalls 10-12-14-16 and 17-19 Faneuil Hall Market 



Basement 3 South Side 



Boston, Mass. 



Tel. Richmond 708 -709 -35 13 



CARPET CONTRACTORS 




WE FURNISH AND LAY CARPETS 



F. A. BREWER CO. 



212 Summer St. 



Tel. Main 4669 



Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

TREMONT & BOYLSTON STS., BOSTON 



Suits, Gowns, Coats, 
Blouses, Skirts, Silk 
Petticoats, Sweaters 



an 



d F 



urs 



Garments for Seminary Girls 
a Special Feature 




Imported Topcoats 

of English Tweeds and Fleeces for 
College and School Girls 

Hats 

In Distinctive and Exclusive styles 
for Dress and Sport Wear 

Furs Gloves Golf Jackets 




*• 




383 WASHINGTON ST 
BOSTON 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 



G. P. Ahner, Pres. L. H. Huot, Treas. E. J. Moneuse, Chairman 



Telephone Richmond 246 and 247 



Duparquet, Huot & 



M 



oneuse 



Co, 



Manufacturers of 



Imperial French Ranges 
High Grade Cooking Apparatus 

Also General Kitchen Outfitters 

90 North Street, Boston 

New York Chicago 



QUALITY 




SERVICE 



MORANDI-PROCTOR CO. 

"Old in Reputation — New in Ideas" 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

COOKING APPARATUS 

FOR 

Hotels, Clubs, Schools, Colleges, 
Seminaries and Restaurants 

The Equipment at the Lasell Dining Hall 
is of our Manufacture 

Also China, Glass and Silverware 
86 WASHINGTON STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




BATCHELDER 
& SNYDER CO. 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 
Wholesale Only 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, 
Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sau- 
sages, Poultry, Game, But- 
ter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, 
Oils, Fresh, Salt and 
Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH, 
NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON 

Offices and Stores 
Telephone Richmond 3000 



William M. Flanders Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 
Boston and Northampton 




cents 
thrive on 



The most delicate and delicious flavored 
chocolate to be found anywhere 



Established 1 842 Capital paid in $90,000.00 Incorporated 1910 

Sands, Furber & Co., Inc. 

COMMISSION FRUITS 

MERCHANTS VEGETABLES 

16 & 17 North Side / Faneuil Hall Market, 
e. a. reed, Pres. BOSTON, MASS. 

F.W.RlCE.Vice-Pres. 
C.H.CUMMINGS TELEPHONE 

Treas. & Gen'l Mgr. 1 552 RICHMOND 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 





John J. Sullivan, Tieas. G. Fiancis Janes, Pres. 
John J. Foley, Vice Pres. 




Doe, Sullivan & Co., Inc. 




DEALERS IN 


DORACO 

QUALITY - GOODS 

THE BEST 

Arthur E. Dorr & Co., Inc. 

Six Large Markets 
We Ship Everywhere 


BUTTER, CHEESE, EGGS, ETC. 

61 & 63 Faneuil Hall Market 
Basement 1 1 % South Side Faneuil Hall Market 

BOSTON 

Telephone Richmond 40 


telephone Richmond} ^78 
NATHAN ROBBINS CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 




POULTRY AND GAME 
BEEF, PORK AND LAMB 




33 and 35 Faneuil Hall Market 

33 North Market Street 

BOSTON, MASS. 






Telephone Richmond 1463 










Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 










Fruit and Produce 










69, 71 and 73 Clinton Street 










OSMON C. BAILEY. President BOSTON, MASS. 














X 





MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 




THEODORE HAVILAND CHINA 

rHE illustration features one of our newest importations from this famous French pottery. 
The border is a soft golden yellow with richly colored flowers and center design of 
hrilliant-plumaged birds of Paradise 



530 
Atlantic Avenue 



Mitchell Woodbury Co. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



One Block from 
South Station 



V. A. PLUTA & CO. 

Meats and Provisions 

Fresh Vegetables in Season 



AUBURNDALE 
SQUARE 



Phone : 
West Newton 0229 



F. Capodanno & Sons 

AUBURNDALE FRUIT MARKET 

Wholesale and Retail 

Fine Assorted Confectionery 
Cigars, Tobacco 

325-327 Auburn St., Taylor Block 
AUBURNDALE 

Telephone, Newton West 1275 



Childs, Sleeper & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BEEF, POULTRY, MUTTON, 
LAMB AND VEAL 

HOTEL SUPPLIES 



57 and 58 N. Market St. 



Boston 



Geo. D. Emerson Co. 

WHOLESALE 
GROCERS 

Largest Distributors in New 
England of High Grade Fruits 
and Vegetables in number 
ten tins 



BOSTON, 



MASS. 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



Ejjjp 




; ( 1923 j 



$10.00 



An unusually Clever Design of the Sandal Type 

for street wear; in Gray, Log Cabin or 

Brown Nubuck or Black Russia Calf. 



Appropriate Hosiery 



T. E. MOSELEY CO. 



1 60 Tremont Street 



GIRLS 



Whenyou are think- 
ing of buying dress 
shoes, walking 
shoes, sneakers, 
ballet or gymnasium 
shoes think of 



CONNELL & CAREY 

(Formerly with Thayer McNeil Co.) 

Shop 4, Second Floor, Little Building 

80 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 

Telephone Beach 1167 



Edw. F. Kakas & Sons, Inc. 

Caracul Jacquettes 

$115 and Upwards 

FOX SCARFS 

NATURAL WHITE, SILVER, 

BLUE AND RED, ALSO 

DYED IN ALL THE 

PREVAILING 

SHADES 



E. A. DAVIS & CO. 

Women's Wear 
Students' Supplies 

Lasell Banners, Pennants and Pillows 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 



364 Boylston Street 

Established 1858 



Near 
Arlington Street 



vjowriie 

FABRIC DYES 

One dye for all fabrics. They give equally 
perfect results when dyeing Cotton, Wool, 

Silk or Mixed Goods 
Simple to Use — Wonderful in Results 

Put up in Tablets in 1 5 and 25 cent packages 
1 8 Fashionable Colors 

Manufactured by 

CARPENTER-MORTON COMPANY 

BOSTON. MASS. 

Who also make Colorite for Straw Hats-Sold at Drug and Dept. stores 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



ANDREWS CORNER 

TEMPLE PLACE and WASHINGTON STREET 

NOW IN STOCK 

Alligator Trimmed Brown and 
Grey Sport Oxfords 

SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


WALTHAM, MASS., 233 MOODY ST., Tel. 047 l-W. 
MALDEN, MASS.. 147 PLEASANT ST.. Tel. 0631-W. 
QU1NCY. MASS.. 3 GRANITE ST.. Tel. 0555-M. 
PAWTUCKET, R. I.. 316 MAIN ST., Tel. 363-R. 

The 

Dorothy Benham 

Hat. 


Fine Hosiery, Beautiful Lingerie, 

Brassieres, Ties, Girdles, Gifts, Novelties, 

Pennants and Pillows 


WINTER is COMING 

Be Prepared. Get Your 

LOMBARD 
MACKINAW 

Warm, Soft, Thick Coatings, Rich Plaids 

Send for Illustrated Booklet of 

Lombard Middies, Skirts, Breeches 
Sweaters, Knickers, Etc. 

LOMBARD MIDDY BLOUSE CO. 

ROOMS 304-309 
665 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

Two Doors from Boylston St. 


Madame Whitney 

557 WASHINGTON ST., WELLESLEY 


THE NOVELTY SHOP 

549 Washington Street 

Opp. Wellesley P. O. 

A Full Line of NO YES BROS., 

Gowns, Hosiery, Neckwear, 
Embroideries and Notions 

Novelties and Gifts of all Kinds 


Guaranteed Rubbers 
Fall and Winter Footwear 

EXPERT SHOE REPAIRING 

The Auburndale Shoe Store 

PHILIP BERMAN, Proprietor 

295 Auburn Street, Auburndale, Mass. 


Cotrell & Leonard 

Albany, N. Y. 

Caps 

Gowns 
Hoods 

for all degrees 


CURTIS & WELD 

Theatrical Costumers 

34 HAYWARD PLACE 
BOSTON 

Telephone Beach 4048 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



32 



LAS ELL LEAVES 



Mandolins, 
Guitars, Banjos 

And Kindred Instruments 

For those who play and who appreciate refined 
tone quality and scientific adjustment. 

Banjos - - $15.00 to $65.00 
Guitars - - 10.00 to 75.00 

Mandolins - 10.00 to 50.00 

Ditson Empire Mandolins 
Ditson Empire Guitars 
Ditson Special Cole Banjos 
Bacon Banjos and Banjo Mandolins 

Martin Guitars and Mandolins 
Tenor Banjos, Banjo-Mandolins 

Ukuleles - - $2.50 to $15.00 
Hawaiian Steel Guitars 

Repairing a Specialty 

Descriptive Catalogue mailed free upon request 

OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

178-179 TREMONT STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



The Green Bough 
Tea Room 

597 Washington Street, Wellesley, Mass. 

DAILY SERVICE FROM 12 TO 7.15 
SUNDAY SUPPER 5.30 TO 7.30 



Our 

Only Travelling Salesman 

"Mr. Postage Stamp" 



Nonantum Pad & Paper Co. 

NEWTONVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 




1 60 Tremont Street 



Between West and Boyleton 
Streets 




C. W. THOMPSON & CO. 

2B Park St., Boston Tel. Haymarket 1150 

Send for our recent Catalogues. Mail 

orders filled the same day as received. 

Music sent on selection if desired. 



MILLINERY 
DRESSES 
BLOUSES 

NOVELTIES 



SWEATERS 
CORSETS 

UNDERWEAR 
HOSIERY 



THE GRAY SHOP 

BEAUTY PARLOR 
2086 Commonwealth Ave. - - Auburndale 

Telephone W. N. 0980-R 



The 

Blue Dragon Tea House 

60 CENTRAL ST., WELLESLEY 

Week Days, 1 1 A. M. until 7.30 P. M. 
Sundays, 5.30 P. M. until 7.30 P. M. 

OVER-NIGHT GUESTS ENTERTAINED 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



OUR TABLE BRAND 
COFFEE is quality coffee. 

It has been roasted and 
blended to produce a de- 
licious, appetizing flavor. 

WEBSTER-THOMAS 

Tea & Coffee Co., 

219 State Street, 

Boston, Mass. 


The National Memory and Fellowship Book 

Used at Lasell Seminary and at the Principal 
Colleges and Schools throughout the Country 

Published Exclusively by 

COLLEGE MEMORY BOOK CO. 

Chicago, 111. 


The Corner Tea Room 

Where you can get the famous 

Fudge Cake, Candies, 

Sandwiches, Ice Cream, etc. 

1 704 WASHINGTON STREET 


A FRIEND 


Johnson & Keyes Express Co. 

EDWARD F. SPENCER, Prop. 

FURNITURE AND PIANO 
MOVING 

436 Lexington Street 
Auburndale 


LASELL GIRLS 

IN THE 

White Mountains 

FOR 

winter sports 

February 15-18, 1924 
FOURTEENTH ANNUAL 

SETH C. BASSETT, Conductor 


Dwyer Pearce & Fogg 
Silk Store — 

Always showing complete stocks of Silks for 
Street, Afternoon, Evening and Sport Wear 

Samples upon request 

25 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 

(OVER WETHERN'S) 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



34 



LASELL LEAVES 



Visit Our New Remodelled Store 

STUDENT'S SUPPLIES 

Fountain Pens, Ever-sharp Pencils, Loose-Leaf Devices 
High Grade Stationery 




57 Franklin Street, Boston, Mass. 
ENGRAVERS STATIONERS PRINTERS 



ATLANTIC PIPE AND SUPPLY 
COMPANY 

WROUGHT IRON AND STEEL PIPE 
Valves and Fittings for Steam, Gas and Water 

1 00 FRIEND STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



Printed Personal Stationery 



200 Single Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 
100 Double Sheets, 100 Envelopes .... 
Printed with name and address 
Hammermill Bond, White, Blue or Gray 

Lasell Seminary Bookstore 

AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



$1.00 
1.00 



Try the Wonderful 

Day Dream Toilet Line 



at 



The Elliot W. Keyes Pharmacy 
Taylor Block, Auburndale 



Compliments 

OLDS' FOOD SHOP 

2094 Commonwealth Avenue 
A uburndale, Mass. 




Art Supplies and Gifts 

DRAWING Supplies and 
Artists' Materials. Gifts 
and Greeting Cards in season. 
Parchment Lamp Shades and 
other decorations dear to the 
heart of the student miss. 

Spaulding-Moss Co. 

42 Franklin Street Just off Washington 

BOSTON 



The Green Gate Tea Shop 

LUNCHEON TEA DINNER 

SPECIAL PARTIES 

Birthday Cakes a Specialty 

Also Cinnamon Buns, Doughnuts, Etc. 
Tel. West Newton 0396 



Store Tel. West Newton 1271 



Greenhouses W. N. 0922 



Riggs The Florist 

Flowers for All Occasions 

2098 Commonwealth Avenue 

Auburndale, Mass. 



LARRY ROSS 
Fine Shoe Repairing 

RUBBERS 

2088 Commonwealth Ave., Auburndale 






MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



35 



W. E. TOMLINSON 

Bicycles and Repairing 

FLASH LIGHTS 
Motor Cycles, Auto Supplies 

1421-3 Washington St., West Newton, Mass. 

TELEPHONE 0169 


All ^raannabb 3Unwn*0 

may iw i}uh at mtr 
JrUouin* *i>rtop 

(Shtr Artiata arr aluiaya at your arrutre 
GDur prirea are alutaya reaaonablr- 

Iflm Spltmmj to ICaadl 

©rbr-ra by mail or telppljottr itllro truth, 
apr-rial rare 

i^nugljtnn diorney 

iFlrjtitpr §>tjop 
Itttor Park £t. OltwrTtt 

SflBtOtt 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

C. F. EDDY CO. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 


E. B. DEACKS & CO. 

Electrical Contractors 

All kinds of Electric Wiring and Electric 
Utensils 


JOHN J. FORAN 

Builder, Contractor, Brick Mason 
and Plasterer 

Granolithic, Chimney, Fireplace and Tile 

RESIDENCE, 25 SHIRLEY STREET 
WEST NEWTON 65, MASS. 


Established 1 882 Incorporated 1 904 

GEORGE P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costumers 

6 BOYLSTON PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 
College Dramatic Work a Specialty 

Telephone Beach 1 45 


Genuine Leather Writing Cases 

Black, Purple, Blue, Old Rose and Brown 
Moire Silk Linine 




$3.95 

Initials Engraved on Buckle Free 




Woodland Park Garage 

TRUMAN C. CROWNER, Prop. 

DORT - service - KISSELL 

1761 Washington Street, 
Auburndale, Mass. 

Telephone, West Newton 1 788 




THORpa Martin 

COMPANY 




66 


FRANKLIN STREET, BOST 


ON 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



36 



LASELL LEAVES 



BANKING SERVICE 

The Newton Trust Company 
solicits checking and savings 
accounts from the faculty and 
students of Lasell Seminary. 

Our Auburndale Office is 
located conveniently near the 
school and station, corner of 
Auburn and Lexington Streets. 

Newton Trust Company 


WE WANT TO BE 
OF SERVICE 

to you and to all of our customers. 
Do not hesitate to come to us if we 
can be of help to you. 

The 

Wellesley National Bank 

ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 


LEWANDOS 

Cleansing 
or Dyeing 

often saves 

Buying 

Cleaners Dyers Launderers 

BOSTON SHOPS 

17 Temple Place 284 Boylston Street 

248 Huntington Avenue 

79 Summer Street 

29 State Street 

Brookline — 1310 Beacon Street 

Cambridge — 1274 Massachusetts Avenue 

Watertown — 1 Galen Street (at works) 

Shops and deliveries in suburbs 

Telephone Service Back Bay 3900 

"YOU CAN RELY ON LEWANDOS" 


Dr. Briggs S. Palmer 

OPTOMETRIST 
1 49 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



New York Boston Philadelphia 

394 Fifth At.. 161 Tremont St 1311 Walnut St. 

164 Tremont St. 




YOUR portrait by recognized artists — your 
simple message of friendship — your gift alone, 
unfading and priceless — your consummate ex- 
pression of regard — the reproduction of yourself. 

What could be nicer or more appreciated by 
your family and friends than a good photo- 
graph ? 

SPECIAL RATES EXTENDED TO LASELL STUDENTS 



WINSHIP, BOIT & CO. 

Harvard Knitting Mills 
Wakefield, Mass. 



"HARVARD MILLS" 

(Hand Finished) 
UNDERWEAR 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



NEW WRIST WATCHES 

Beautiful in Design, Dependable as 
Time Pieces 




$60.00 

15 Jewels— 18k White Gold 
Case. Extra heavy gold, narrow 
in shape, very refined. 




$30.00 

15 Jewels— 14k White Gold 
Case. We guarantee this watch 
to be an excellent time keeper. 




$60.00 

17 Jewels— 18k White Gold 
Case. Very finely engraved 
border in the very fashionable 
rectangular shape. 




$18.00 

1 5 Jewels — Green Gold Filled 
Case. The best value for the 
price we have ever sold. 



GOLD JEWELRY 



SCARF PINS . -, 
LINK BUTTONS . 
POCKET KNIVES 
PENCILS . . . 
SIGNET RINGS . 
CIGAR CUTTERS 



$3 to $50 
$3 to $50 
$5 to $25 
$7.50 to $25 
$5 to $35 
$10 to $20 



WALDEMAR CHAINS $7.50 to $35 



STERLING SILVER 

BELT BUCKLES . . $2 to $10 
EVERSHARP PENCILS $2.50 to $4 
CIGARETTE CASES . $10 to $30 
MATCH BOXES . . $3.75 to $10 
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES $1to$15 
MILITARY BRUSHES $4 to $30 
AUTO LIC. CASES $3.50 to $7.50 




SUMMER St, 



aEWE£Efc>Js$£ 



F. F. DAVIDSON 



F. F. DAVIDSON, Ji. 



MENTION THE LEAVES 





Vol. XXXXIX 



No. 4 



MARCH, 1924 



I 



LASELL LEAVES 



C&.UbVe* Co. 

Estahlished 1&41 *r 



EVENING SLIPPERS 

Superb brocades of Gold and Silver, 
rare tinsels and satins of lustrous sheen, 
decorations of sparkling and original 
beauty, make the present showing of 
I. Miller Evening Slippers one of 
fascinating attraction. 

Cuban, Baby Louis or Full Spanish Heels 

PRICED $12.50 

/. Miller Creations Exclusively at C. F. Hovey's, Boston, Mass. 




Jane Tooher Sports Clothes 

7 1 1 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 



GYMNASIUM GARMENTS 
MADE TO MEASURE 



OFFICIAL OUTFITTER FOR 

LASELL SEMINARY 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



The Silhouette Shop 

IS ON AUBURN STREET 

Opposite the Station 

Lunches Dinners 

Afternoon Tea 



ICE CREAM CANDY SODA HOT CHOCOLATE 



CHAS. BAXTER, Prop. Aubumdale Tel.W. Newton 1202-R 



TVWCffESTM 



TRADE MARK 



"Sportswomen's Headquarters" 

Tremont at Washington at 

West St. Bromfield St. 

BOSTON 

Distinctive and Attractive Women's Apparel 

for Street and Sports Wear 

Topcoats, Overcoats, Raincoats, Suits, Riding Habits, 

Dresses, Knickers, Breeches, Sweaters, Waists, 

Scarfs, Hose, Hats, Shoes 

Costumes for Skating, Snowshoeing, etc., Snowshoes, Skis, Toboggans, Skates 

Sportswomen's Headquarters is all that its name 
implies— Outfitter to Sportswomen in every field 
of sport, both the equipment and the clothing 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




Those dainty underthings 
you prize 

Silk or fine batiste — just like new 

LUX keeps the texture of all your underthings 
soft and lustrous as the day you took them from 
their box. 

There is no harmful ingredient in it to coarsen 
and stiffen silk, to fuzz up cottons and linens, 
nothing to take the color out of delicately hued 
garments. 

"The mild LUX lather cleanses so quickly and 
with such gentleness," says a great manufacturer 
of fine underwear, "that it is impossible for it to 
injure the garment." 



LUX 



Beattie & McGuire 



Famous for 



SILKS, DRESS GOODS, COATINGS, 



LINENS, LADIES' HOSIERY 



HANDKERCHIEFS 



Noted for Lower Prices and Better Values 



29 Temple Place, Boston, Mass. 



"PURITY ICE" 

IS ONLY 

NEWTON DRINKING 
WATER FROZEN 

Clean, Pure and Economical 
Use it in your New Home 



Purity Ice Co., Inc. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 
Telephone, Centre Newton 0069 

All that it's cracked up to he 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



LASELL LEAVES 



FLORISTS FOR LASELL FOR 27 YEARS 

a x Utters 

TlOR/STS 

Cljmr? Uoaes, Italrta m* (irrlji&a 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled 

44 TEMPLE PLACE BOSTON 




CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 



Telephones Beach 6431, 6432 



Home of the Better Made Boston Joker, Dribble 
Glass, Novelty Favor Hats, Unique Rose and 
Shaker Horn, Rose Cricket, and Doily Blow Outs. 
Masks, Puzzles, Place Cards, Noise Makers, Joke 
Books, Parlor Game Books, Trick and Fortune 
Telling Cards, Bridal and Birthday Cake Fortune 
Telling Sets. 

Serpentine. Confetti, Inflated & Deflated Balloons 
Mah Jong Prizes and Favors. Also other Clever 
Joker Novelties. Dance, Dinner & Party Favors. 



fi 

22 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 



SHOES FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

Evening Slippers Orthopedic Shoes 

Ballet Slippers Walking Shoes 

Gymnasium Shoes Sports Shoes 

Suitable Hosiery 

A. H. HOWE & SONS 
WALK -OVER SHOPS 



170 Tremont St.— 378 Washington St. 
BOSTON 



2359 Washington St. 
ROXBURY 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



LASELL LEAVES 




More than 100 years in business 



Rooms as fresh as a new frock— 

Let linoleum strike the note in the less formal rooms of your home. 
It comes in such a variety of patterns ; it is so durable, so sanitary, so 
cheerful that it has become almost the standard floor for bedroom, 
bath, kitchen and sun-parlor. 

STAINES ENGLISH INLAID LINOLEUM 

unquestionably surpasses all others in beauty and wear. At PRAY'S, 
the oldest Rug House in America, Staines stocks are most complete 
and surpass in economy, as may be easily proved by comparison. 

$1.65 to $2.65 the yard 

John H. Pray & Sons Co. 

646 Washington Street, Opp. Boylston Street, Boston 



GIFTS THAT LAST 

EVERY LADY ADMIRES A LOVELY NECKLACE OF LA TAUSCA PEARLS 



You will also find a Large 
Assortment of 

Diamond Rings 

Stone Rings of all kinds 

Wrist Watches 

Gold and Silver Bracelets 




Bar Pins 

Lingerie Clasps 

Eversharp Pencils 

Fountain Pens 

Umbrellas, and many 
other useful articles to 
select from 



WALTHAM'S UP-TO-DATE JEWELRY STORE 
Waltham Jewelry Co. 427 Moody Street 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING 



MENTION THE LEAVES 



Basell Reaves 

Vol. XXXXIX LASELL SEMINARY, AUBURNDALE 66, BOSTON, MASS., MARCH, 1924 No. 4 

Published Bi-Monthly from October to June by the Lasell Seminary Students. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Boston, Mass., Post Office. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized on October 28, 1918. 





LASELL 


LEAVES STAFF '23 AND *24 




Editor-in-Chief 






Business Manager 


JOCELYN TONG 




Assistant Literary Editor 
ESTHER PALMER 


ELIZABETH FRICK 


Assistant Editor 
RUTH BUFFINGTON 




Joke Editors 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 

MARIA PARRY 


Local Editors 

ANNA HENDEE 

ELIZABETH NO»"tU 


Literary Editor 






Athletic Editor 


DORIS WOODRUFF 






EDITH HAD 1 — 



TERMS, in Advance: One Copy, one year, (including postage), $2.00. Single Copies, 35 cent* 

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CONTENTS 

LITERARY 

The House on the Hill 

Just Girl 

On Reading "The Island Pharisees" ■ • ■ 

EDITORIAL 

LOCALS 

THE PROGRESSIVE DINNER 



Dorothy Sch^maker 7 
Muriel Tompkins 9 

■ • Mary M&rhart 10 

■ - • -11 

13 

... • • 16 



ATHLETICS 17 

THE WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 18 

WOODLAND PARK NOTES 19 

THE ENDOWMENT FUND 20 

LASELL CLUB NOTES • • ■ ■ 23 

PERSONALS 27 

JOKES 45 



LASELL LEAVES 




MENTION THE LEAVES 



V><- A 




THE HOUSE ON THE HILL 

Betty Jeanne stared unhappily out of the 
window, across the intervening houses and 
trees, to the House on the Hill. Its gray walls 
loomed proudly into the late afternoon sky, its 
turrets gleamed in the sun-light. But Betty 
Jeanne, for once, saw it not. In her heart was 
bitterness, and on her face, a scowl. Betty 
Jeanne had a most distressing problem to settle. 
The problem was her room-mate. 

Betty Jeanne had come away to school, three 
months ago, with the fullest intention of enjoy- 
ing herself. Illusions were her specialty, and 
she had had plenty about boarding-school life. 
But dreams, like bubbles, have a habit of shat- 
tering with heart-breaking suddenness. Not 
that she didn't like school ; she did ; she loved 
it ; but somehow, it was so different. Betty 
Jeanne herself did not know exactly why she 
felt so discouraged and disappointed, but the 
feeling was there. Mostly, perhaps, because 
of Margaret. Margaret was her room-mate. 

When Betty Jeanne first saw her, she was 
delighted, but soon she found that life with 
Margaret was not all roses. Margaret was a 
born pessimist. Most of her days were spent 
in sulking and grumbling ; and her matter-of- 
fact cheating made Betty Jeanne, who despised 
anything underhanded, positively wince. 

Margaret, however, had her virtues. She 
was generous, to a fault ; and there were times 
when she would, show flashes of true affection 
and gratitude. But to Betty Jeanne, living 
with her was becoming, daily, more of a bur- 
den. To-day, an open break had come. 

Betty Jeanne, exasperated by Margaret's 



ceaseless grumbling, had retorted, disgustedly. 
It did not take long for them to start quarrel- 
ing; and Margaret, finally, had gone out, slam- 
ming the door angrily behind her. And now, 
Betty Jeanne felt like crying from sheer dis- 
couragement. 

The door opened softly, and Bobby Win- 
throp came in. Bobby was the popular darling 
of the corridor ; moreover, she was an old girl. 
The new girls considered these two assets, irre- 
sistible. Betty Jeanne thought that Bobby her- 
self was irresistible. She jumped to her feet 
with a quick smile. 

"Come and sit in the window, Bobby," she 
begged. "The sunset is going to be glorious." 

Curled up on the window-seat, the two sat 
in silence, watching the sky. Finally Betty 
Jeanne burst forth. 

"Complaining is Margaret's favorite indoor 
sport !" she exclaimed bitterly, and instantly 
was sorry she had spoken, it seemed so unfair 
to the absent girl. Bobby only smiled sympa- 
thetically, but soon she spoke. Her gaze was 
resting on the House on the Hill. 

"I wonder if vou have ever heard the old 
story about the House on the Hill," she said, 
and at Betty's eager, "No, what is it?" she 
went on, "I'll tell you about it, then." 

Betty Jeanne lifted her eyes to the slim tur- 
rets of the House on the Hill, while Bobby's 
voice seemed to come from far away. 

"Long, long ago, over in old England, there 
stood a castle on a hill. Its high walls were 
gray ; from every corner, towers and turrets 
shot into the sky. The lord of the castle was 
a good man and brave, and his people were 
happy. 



8 



LASELL LEAVES 



"But the world, at that time, was war-rid- 
den; and year after year, when the spring 
came, a long line of knights rode down the 
highway, youthful knights in silver armor, 
their slender lances gleaming in the sun. And 
always their grave young eyes gazed ahead, 
in ardent search for truth. But as they 
searched, they cheered and helped the country- 
side by little, thoughtful deeds of kindness. 

"Year after year, there was always a new, 
silver-gleaming line ; always new young knights 
rode forth, in their never-ending search. And 
when the dreary winters came, before glowing 
fires in the dim old halls, the wanderers, home 
again, told tales of adventure and wonder that 
held their listeners spellbound. It was a life 
of romance, in those days. 

"Many, many years after this, a little son of 
the castle was born. The proud blood of the 
young knights was his heritage; but he never 
ran on the wide highway, or played beneath its 
shadowing oaks. From childhood he had been 
crippled. He used to lie by the side of the 
high, narrow window and gaze at the road, 
while his old nurse told him stories that her 
grandmother had told her ; stories of the 
strange quests of the knights, of long winter 
evenings by the fireside, when the old knights 
told of their youth. And as he listened, the 
little cripple saw the winding lane of shimmer- 
ing spears, the youthful knights, and the boy- 
ish faces beneath the stern helmets. 

"As the little boy grew older, he longed, 
more and more, to be able to do deeds such as 
these. But being a cripple, he must be con- 
tent to lie helpless, and to dream his adven- 
tures. 

"When he grew older, he crossed the ocean 
and came here to live. But he loved the old 
castle with its tales of glory so well that he 
built this House on the Hill like it. And when 
his two sons were small, he told them the old, 
old stories. 

"The cripple died when he was an old man, 
and the House on the Hill and its stories be- 
longed to his eldest son. 

"But in those times, too, there was strife ; 
and a feud arose between the two sons, who 



loved each other dearly, and one of their 
neighbors. 

"One day, the younger son was brought 
home — dead. Their enemy-neighbor had shot 
him in a quarrel. All night long, the living son 
sat by the side of his younger brother and 
fought a great fight, because it was in his 
heart to kill his neighbor. At dawn he rose, 
white with rage and suffering, and took his 
gun. But as he stepped outside the door, down 
the wide driveway, rode a shadowy file of 
knights. The whole world was utterly silent, 
but the wind blew back the long, fair hair of 
the riders, and the first rays of the sun glanced 
on their spears. 

"As the brother watched, he remembered the 
tales his father had told him ; and with bowed 
head he laid down his gun. Thus did the 
feud, end between the two families, and peace 
came. They say, that when a son of the House 
on the Hill thinks to do a great wrong, the 
ghost-file of young knights marches out of the 
dawn and prevents him." 

Bobby's voice trailed away into silence. The 
western sky was a sea of red-gold ; against it, 
the House on the Hill was sharply silhouetted. 
Through the trees came a gleam, as if from a 
shining lance. 

Betty Jeanne threw her arms impulsively 
around Bobby. 

"Thank you, dear, so much," she whispered, 
and Bobby knew what she meant. 

After dinner, Margaret came in again. She 
did not speak to Betty Jeanne; but when she 
had banged around in the closet for some time, 
Betty Jeanne was forced to speak. 

"Is there anything I can help you with, Mar- 
garet ?" 

"No," Margaret replied, coldly, "Only I'm 
going in town to-night, and I haven't a thing to 
wear." 

Before Betty Jeanne's eyes rushed visions- 
silvered knights — gleaming spears — "but as 
they searched ... by little, thoughtful deeds 
of kindness." 

"Would you like to wear my orange crepe ?" 
she offered meekly. "It would look lovely with 
your dark hair." 



LASELL LEAVES 



"Betty Jeanne ! You darling !" Margaret 
was upon her like a whirlwind. "Could I ? 
And after the way I acted !" 

In Betty Jeanne's eyes was a vision of her- 
self, clad in silver armor, sitting as straight on 
her horse as the long lance she carried. And 
Betty Jeanne rather liked, that vision. 

Dorothy Schumaker. 



JUST GIRL 

Betty believed in dates, careers, jazz, and 
clothes. She had a good voice and belonged 
tc the Glee Club. She liked music, dreamed 
about studying abroad, and after that — . 

She was rather vague as to what would hap- 
pen after her years of study abroad. She saw 
herself in a Parisian gown, singing in a 
crowded concert hall. The audience applauded 
wildly, pelting her with flowers. Dates were 
eagerly sought by royalty and brother artists. 
She imagined herself, a vivid part of the night 
life of gay Paris, being seen on the beach at 
Deauville and other places — and so on indefi- 
nitely. At present her ideas of just what a 
celebrated singer "did abroad," were extremely 
limited. 

It was usually at this point in her plans that 
she had to stop and dress as Jim was coming 
at eight. Jim was it, you see. She and. Jim 
might even be engaged, if it were not for the 
fact that he was emphatically opposed to 
Parisian gowns and crowds, greatly preferring 
a bungalow apron and nobody at all besides 
themselves. 

Usually they skated, danced, or went to the 
movies, without broaching this dangerous sub- 
ject. But, if on the screen or stage, they saw 
a girl of the clinging vine type, Jim always 
expressed his admiration, seeming unable to 
keep it to himself. Sometimes Betty only 
laughed ; sometimes she informed him, rather 
pityingly, that, "Men always fell for that baby 
doll type." 

"She hasn't even sawdust inside her head, as 
most dolls have," she remarked scathingly on 
one occasion. 

"She hasn't?" grunted her escort bitterly. 



"Maybe not, but she knows enough to be a girl 
and not a hybrid animal that's neither a girl 
nor a boy." 

"Many thanks for the kind words," retorted 
Betty. "But you know this is the twentieth 
century and women can take care of them- 
selves if they are 'hybrid animals'." 

"Yeah. Girls make themselves cheap, 'The 
Kind of a Girl a Man Forgets'." Jim was 
lazily cynical. 

"All ypu men want is a 'yes' man. You 
read of them in the movie magazines. Their 
job is to keep the director calmed down, to 
agree with everything he says. That's what 
you want for a wife." Betty finished reck- 
lessly. 

Jim answered quickly, "No, that's not the 
kind of a wife I want; but I could tell you 
what kind I do want. I want — " 

"All right. Tell me some other time," has- 
tily interposed Betty. 

Though, arguing, they often became peeved 
at each other, they continued to go- around to- 
gether. Betty sometimes thought, "I could be 
awfully mad at him — only — somehow — well, 
we've always known each other" — she would 
trail off indistinctly. 

Then they both went away to college. They 
did not see each other for a long time ; and 
Betty, sometimes, complained of being home- 
sick. 

Jim called at the college ; and after going 
through the proverbial red tape, they finally 
came face to face again. Jim was different, 
somehow. 

After a desperate silence, he said, "I-er-sup- 
pose you-er-you belong to the Glee Club ? You 
still sing, don't you?" 

Betty plunged, in. "Why-er-no, I haven't 
been able to make the Glee Club here. They 
have so much better voices in this club than in 
the one at High School. My, how you have 
changed, Jim! I'd hardly know you." 

"You've changed yourself. Glad to hear 
you're not so frantic about music." Jim began 
to warm up. 

"Are you? One always gets discouraged, 
you know. I'm studying music here. But this 



10 



LASELL LEAVES 



teacher does not give me much encourage- 
ment." Betty was feeling much more at home 
now. 

"Oh!" An impressive silence, then, "Got a 
date on this Saturday?" Jim was elaborately 
casual. 

"N-no. Nothing serious. Were you think- 



mg- 



.?" 



"I was not. Rarely do, in fact. Let's go in 
to dinner and dance. Think you can get out?" 

"Oh, yes, I guess so. Mother's letter, you 
know, said I could go with you." Betty was 
duly indifferent. 

It was some time later that she wrote to a 
girl friend, at home : 

Dear Jeanne: — I've such a lot to tell you, I 
don't know where to begin. I think I'll give 
you the bitter first, and then the sweet "to 
take the taste out". 

The voice teacher here had the nerve to tell 
me that she would advise me not to take up 
music professionally. She says I'm not wrap- 
ped up in it enough ! I like that ! She says I 
have a nice voice to amuse myself with or to 
entertain my friends, but not a professional 
voice. 

I think it's likely you can guess what the 
sweet news is. Jim and I went in town one 
Saturday. I wore a bouffant skirt and acces- 
sories. Jim was delighted. He sent out for 
flowers, a beautiful corsage. But there was 
nothing to keep them on with, so Jim gave me 
his "frat" pin. That seemed to hold them 
very well. Break it to Mother gently. She 
didn't want me to become engaged until I was 
through college. 

Your "fluttery" friend, 

Betty. 
Muriel Tompkins. 



ON READING "THE ISLAND 
PHARISEES" 

By John Galsworthy 

John Galsworthy does not fear to stand 

alone with the courage of his convictions, and 

do his mightiest to tear down the old social 

standards of living in England. He caricatures 



and ridicules class distinction, but he does not 
do this altogether unpleasantly ; he rather casts 
a light on some subject which nine out of ten 
of us overlook or accept as inevitable. He up- 
holds individuality, even to the extreme, and 
his sentiments are obviously with the radical 
whom he seems to use as a model. 

Galsworthy thoroughly dislikes the character 
who nonchalantly treads in the footsteps of his 
predecessor, and accepts unquestioningly the 
old laws and traditions, as, "Whatever is, is 
right". He admires the one who strays away 
and finds new life and new ideas, ignoring the 
wisdom which has been built up by experience 
for thousands of years. 

In "The Island Pharisees," we find the 
life of Shelton, the hero, completely changed by 
his acquaintance with the radical, Louis Fer- 
rand ; he becomes disillusioned, in every phase 
of life; he sees everything through new eyes, 
and finds the world a most unpleasant place in 
which to live. He is not understood but sadly 
misinterpreted, and his life becomes most un- 
happy. We cannot think of this character as 
human, as one that we would be likely to meet ; 
we feel that Shelton is simply created by Gals- 
worthy to illustrate the point that he is trying 
to make clear. In fact, all the characters are 
unreal ; but each is well and artistically defined 
as a type, — the wanderer, the radical, the slave 
to convention. 

Galsworthy is a great thinker : he weighs a 
subject carefully, regards it from all points of 
view, but his opinion, once decided, we feel is 
unflinching. His plays, as his books, deal 
largely with one subject, the hypocrisy of the 
different classes of society. In his contempt 
for the "content with sameness", we find his 
philosophy a bit dangerous, for he does not 
fear nor hesitate to destroy the balance and 
control which have been acquired by genera- 
tions of experience. 

Nevertheless, I believe Galsworthy is one of 
our greatest writers, for he forces us to reflect 
on the problems he presents. 

Mary Ehrhart. 








itottii 



ARE YOU A GOOD SPORT? 

Do you play the game, the game of life, for 
personal glory or for the game itself ? The 
code of a good sport has nine points : 

1. Thou shalt not quit ! 

Your lessons may be hard, may seem almost 
impossible. Keep on, plug away till you get 
them. No one likes a quitter. You may not 
have as brilliant recitations as your next door 
neighbor, but you did your best. You were 
no quitter. 

2. Thou shalt not alibi ! 

Excuses, excuses ! Who cares why ? You 
hire a cook for the purpose of preparing your 
meals. Do you care why the meat came late, 
because the stove was broken, the salt spilled? 
You want your food. You can't eat excuses. 

3. Thou shalt not ask odds thou art unwill- 
ing to give ! 

Will you take the up-hill side, part of the 
time? Will you let the sun beat in your face, 
half the game ; or do you ask to play in the 
shade all the time ? 

4. Thou shalt not take unfair advantage ! 
If you know your opponent's weakness, 

don't take an unfair advantage of him. Treat 
him as you'd want him to treat you, were the 
circumstances reversed. 

5. Thou shalt be ready to give thy opponent 
the shade ! 

Offer him the best side, anyway. He's fair 
and will not keep it all the time. Show you 
think of him some of the time and not eternally 
of yourself. You are willing to play fair. 

6. Thou shalt not gloat over winnings ! 
You've beaten in your game today. Can't 



you afford to be charitable to the other fellow ? 
Didn't he play his hardest, didn't he want to 
win ? Help him to forget his discouragements, 
to work harder, and perhaps he, too, may be a 
winner tomorrow. 

7. Thou shalt not be a poor loser ! 
Don't whine if you've lost. It was a fair 

game and the best man won. You can't always 
be a winner. There are ups and downs to all 
games. Take your knocks with your head up. 

8. Remember — the game is the thing and he 
who thinks otherwise is no true sportsman. 

9. Honor the game thou playest, for he 
who plays hard and straight, wins, even when 
he loses ! 

Get into the game ; and play with the Golden 
Rule your motto. You'll get the best out of it 
and be a winner at the end of the race. Show 
your sportsmanship in your work and play. 
Come on ! Be a good sport, the world needs 
such. 



HEARTS TRUMPS 



A familiar song runs, "In the spring a young 
man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love." 
February 14 is considered by most, of us as the 
first day of spring, regardless of its seasonable 
suitability. We become burdened with our 
hearts and long to lay them at the feet of our 
idols. The mail boxes are flooded with anony- 
mous declarations of lost hearts, ranging all the 
way from violent red sentiments to pale, but 
still passionate, pink. We are not all sincere 
in this matter, for it is a case of "let not thy 
right hand know what thy left hand doeth." 
While we present our hearts with impassioned 



12 



LASELL LEAVES 



verses in one hand, we are also handing out a 
papier-mache imitation in the other. The great 
difficulty often, even for the donor, is to deter- 
mine which is the real and which merely the 
well-intentioned dummy. Lasell is the one 
Valentine to whom we all tender our hearts 
and affections ; but each of us has at least one 
other, perhaps more. Though Valentine's Day 
may be nothing more than a jolly day of con- 
ventional fun, it can be an excellent time to 
consider seriously another side of the heart. 
I allude to the threadbare, but still vital, topic 
of friends. Take stock of your friends, appre- 
ciate them, give them a warm corner of your 
heart, resolve to be a friend to them, the kind 
of friend you would like to have when you are 
in a tight place. Reams and reams of poetry 
have been written on friendship and doubtless 
quite as much prose. We all have a pretty 
definite idea of what the word implies. So 
here's to Saint Valentine of bleeding hearts, 
but spare a few heart-beats for true friendship. 



THE FALL 
Is like a lovely dying thing, 

That, with a smile 
Of vivid lips, does fling 

A challenge 
Flashing to the old gray world. 

Wild with defiance, 
To the tragic last, 

She sings 
And dances in a giddy whirl, 

And dies 
In glory, 'neath the Northern Blast. 

Sylvia Starr. 

MY VALENTINE 
To-day an old sweetheart of mine 
Is my most precious Valentine : 
My best and oldest sweetheart, you 
Are, Mother dear. So loyal and true, 
And tender always ; and your love, 
I cherish over and above 

Earth's fairest gifts. You've made of me, 
All that I am, and hope to be, 

Mother o' mine, 

My Valentine. 

Buff. 





The two stories published in this issue of the 
Leaves were among those submitted in the 
Leaves Short Story Contest. 

After months of waiting, final classifications 
made their appearance. A few of us were 
lifted to glory. 

Helen Hanson, the former Vice-President 

of the Sophomore class, Marion Simonds, 

Barbara dishing, Helen Landon, and Muriel 

Tompkins made Junior. At a recent election 

of the Sophomore class, Helen Maclntyre was 

elected Vice-President. Betty Saxton was 

made a Sophomore, and she is taking Barbara 

Cushing's place as Sophomore Song-leader. 

We congratulate them all. 

Dec. 17, 1923. One of the most interesting 

events, at the close of the old year, was the 

presentation of three one-act plays by the 

Lasell Dramatic Club. The exceptionally 

fine work of this first performance does 

great credit both to Miss Francois and to 

her pupils. The program was as follows : 

ACT II. OF "THE BIRD'S CHRISTMAS 

CAROL" Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Time: Christmas Morning 
Cast: 
Mrs. Ruggles Helen Black 

Sarah Maud Julia Larrabee 

Clement Marjorie Hitchins 

Cornelius Pauline Gagne 

Peter Gertrude Wragg 

Kitty Helen Strifert 

Peoria Sylvia Parker 

Larry Leonore Belber 



Pierrot 
Pierrette 



Phyllis Hessin 



Katherine Kelley 

Virginia Brunner 

Marion Miles 



Uncle Jack Marguerite Virkler 

Elfrida Ruth Martin 

"HEARTS TO MEND" Harry A. Overstreet 

Time: Supper Time 

Cast: 

Margaret Bunnell 
Sarah Barnum 
Tins-to-Mend Man 

"MANSIONS" 
Time: Yesterday 
Cast: 
Harriet Wilde 
Lydia Wilde (her niece) 
Joe Wilde (her nephew) 

Shortly after our return from the Christmas 
vacation, the following permanent officers for 
the Student Council were elected to serve with 
Edith Clendenin, the President: 

Gardner — Helen Perry! 

Carpenter— Elizabeth Frick, Dorothy Bar- 
nard. 

Hawthorne — Katherine Knox. 
Clark — Ruth Stoneman. 
Bragdon — Katherine Beecher, Helen Black. 
Woodland — Virginia Brunner, Lucille Hop- 
kins, Sarah Barnum. 

Bancroft — Katherine Kelley. 



Our Friday afternoon lecture, January 11, 
by Mrs. Elsie Powers was an extremely inter- 
esting one on the "Mission Plays of Califor- 
nia". Her talk was accompanied by beautiful 
colored slides of various sections of California. 
The lovely old missions which have stood for 
years and are peculiar to California were her 



14 



LASELL LEAVES 



main theme. The time went all too quickly 
before she had the opportunity of portraying 
the characteristics of the actors in the Mission 
Plays. 

January 18 — One of the most interesting- 
lectures of the year was given by Miss 
Elizabeth Hasanovitz. Her appeal to us was 
closer because of our friendship with her sis- 
ter, Sonia. 

Miss Hasanovitz told us, in detail, the cir- 
cumstances of her own life; of her trip to 
America and her return to Russia ; of her 
rescue of her family under difficulties that 
would have daunted the bravest man ; and of 
how her courage was finallv rewarded when 
her whole family arrived, safe and free, in the 
United States. 

We learned a little history of Russia, — that 
the first inhabitants of southern Russia were 
tribes who subsisted mainly on prey. From 
these crude people, civilization sprang up, and 
with that came Christianity. The ruler decreed 
that every person not believing in the Christian 
faith should be driven into the water ; in that 
way he was assured of the spread of the 
religion ; and with this new faith, came culture. 
Petrograd, the town of Peter, has been, from 
then until the present time, called the Gate to 
Civilization. 

When we hear how difficult and almost im- 
possible it is for the average Russian to get 
an education, it surely makes us appreciate 
the educational advantages of our country. 
Miss Hasanovitz said that after the revolution 
and war in 1919 schools sprang up, which peo- 
ple of sixty-five eagerly attended. The great 
famine of 1920 and 1921 closed many of these 
schools ; but, as soon as possible, an agreement 
was made by which 30 percent of the taxes 
paid by the peasants should go toward keeping 
the schools open. In other respects, however, 
the peasant still clings to his old customs. Out 
of the three hundred and sixty-five days in the 
year, they have fifty-two holidays and one hun- 
dred and eight Saint days. They are content, 
however, just to be left alone, to be allowed to 
relax, and to look at the stars by night, which 
still remain to them a romance and mystery. 



A very clever comparison was made between 
the Russian peasant and a big bear, just com- 
ing out from the dark, not understanding the 
world, but wanting to be worthy and equal. 
They are anxious for peace and desire to fol- 
low the simple teaching of Christ. Although 
there is still strife in Russia, and governments 
come and go, yet the peasant still survives and 
his one aim is to establish universal love and 
brotherhood. 

Some mud. plates made in 1868, candle 
sticks, rugs, shawls, and other beautiful pieces 
of hand work from Russia were displayed and 
explained to us by Miss Hasanovitz. 

January 18, Woodland Park opened its doors 
for the Christian Endeavor meeting, which 
was lead by Helen Hanson. Her message to 
us was, not only to have friends, but to be 
a friend to others. To be kind-hearted, trust- 
worthy, true and faithful ; to overlook one's 
faults and let his good, points offset his bad 
ones, are a few of the splendid, characteristics 
for good friendship. 

January 20, our Vesper service was lead by 
the Reverend Dr. Ashley D. Leavitt, whose 
subject was "The Builders." 

He compared man to the builder, and 
showed how the foundation must be made of 
character, love, ambition, and honesty, on the 
sites of truth, decency, courtesy, and Chris- 
tian ideals. Any one that is a citizen of a 
country and a member of a community can be 
a builder. When sorrows come to us and our 
life is not as smooth as we would like to have 
it. we must not think that we are being pun- 
ished for some misdoing and that our house is 
shaken on its foundations ; often the storms 
are only tests of character, and we must be 
as rocks and not let our trust be shaken or be 
cast down. 

January 22, 1924, the Cercle Frangais enter- 
tained the third year French class at dinner, in 
the parlors of the Main Building. Eva May 
Mortimer was elected as vice-president to suc- 
ceed Marie Boucher. 

January 25, through the courtesy of Le Cer- 
cle Frangais, we had Mr. Harold Vinal at Lec- 
ture. From his own collection of poems, he 



LASELL LEAVES 



15 



read, among others, "She Sews", "Manor 
House", "Chestnut Street, Boston", "The 
Ghost Walk", and "Exiled". Especially im- 
pressive were his poems of the sea. 

January 25, the President of the junior 
class, Jessie Matteson, spoke to us at Christian 
Endeavor on the subject of friendship, enu- 
merating three kinds of friends.; those whom 
we can help, those who can help us, and those 
who reciprocate. To have friends one must 
have sterling qualities and a good, honest char- 
acter. The meeting was closed by the reading 
of one of Edgar Guest's poems and a song by 
Miriam Smith. 

January 27, Mr. Harold Schwab, one of Mr. 
Dunham's pupils, was with us at Vespers, Sun- 
day afternoon. Mr. Schwab was graduated 
from the Boston Conservatory, two years ago, 
and is an especially brilliant organist. His in- 
terpretations were most interesting. His last 
selection was the first movement of a Sonata 
composed by Mr. Dunham. 

February 1, we were most fortunate in hav- 
ing for our Friday Lecture, Mrs. Lucia Ames 
Mead. Her message to us was of world af- 
fairs. In regard to Ex-President Wilson, she 
brought out, that although he failed in what 
he attempted, and although he was not a real 
politician, he was a great statesman, with a 
single purpose and a noble one. Through his 
efforts, the world is bound together to-day as 
never before. Mrs. Mead spoke briefly re- 
garding the League of Nations. A comparison 
was made regarding the trouble and confusion 
that was a result of the League of Nations get- 
ting started and of our States adopting the Con- 
stitution. The Court of the League has accom- 
plished wonders in helping nations to keep 
their word in international affairs ; and as once 
in every nine years each nation sends a repre- 
sentative and the judges are elected, it is a 
most democratic proceeding. Mrs. Mead pre- 
dicted that another war will soon be upon us, 
as everywhere people are getting ready for one. 
Although every one becomes nobler through 
struggle, yet this does not justify war. 

February 1, "Loyalty" was the subject of 
Catherine Lallev's address at Christian En- 



deavor. She defined loyalty as a power within 
us, that every one feels. Devotion, faithful- 
ness, sincerity, fidelity and homage, all go to 
make up this one word, loyalty. We must be 
loyal to our parents, our friends, our school 
and ourselves. The service was closed by sing- 
ing the Alma Mater of Lasell. 

February 3, Dr. E. P. Drew, one of our own 
local pastors, lead us in our Vesper service. 
His subject was "Time", a most valuable asset 
in our lives. His talk was splendidly inspiring. 

February 8, Martha Fish conducted Chris- 
tian Endeavor, and chose as the topic of dis- 
cussion, the difference between being genuine 
and superficial. She compared life to a crown 
of precious jewels ; the best and choicest stones 
are in the front of the crown, and the smaller 
and less valuable ones in the background ; in 
life the genuine should stand out, and the 
superficial should take a part in the obscure 
background. Her closing verse was from 
Shakespeare : 

"To thine own self be true, 

And it must follow, as the night the day, 
Thou canst not then be false to any man." 

A closing selection was beautifully sung by 
Beth Nowell. 

February 8, Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead com- 
pleted her series of lectures to us. She told us 
that the winner of the Bok prize, Dr. Charles 
Lenamore, an M. I. T. student of some years 
ago, was an earnest student of the League and 
most desirous that the United States join the 
League. 

She answered several questions that the girls 
had written out and passed to her, regarding 
disarmament, suffrage, Mussolini's work in 
Italy, and other topics. 

Then she told us a little about the situation 
in Europe, how the Labor party is coming into 
power in England, and is composed of practical 
idealists, with theories of peace obtained by 
peaceful means. This new Labor party aims 
to aid those out of work and to bring France 
and Great Britain together again. 

Although Germany surrendered to President 
Wilson's fourteen points and agreed to pay 
reparation, she did not know exactly what she 



16 



LASELL LEAVES 



was signing until May, 1921. Meanwhile a 
reparation committee had been busy and de- 
cided that she should pay seventy-three billion 
gold dollars. When the United States went 
into the World War, her Civil War debts 
were unpaid ; and when Great Britain went 
into the World. War, her Napoleonic war debts 
were unpaid. Is not Germany also entitled to 
a reasonable extension of time for payment? 



The Carnival ! One long evening of enjoy- 
ment by the Seniors, Saturday, February 9th. 
The sleds and toboggans were in constant de- 
mand, for the coasting was perfect. The 
warm gym was an inviting refuge for those 
who had had enough of the cold and were 
ready to eat and to dance. Hot dogs, rolls, 
pickles, doughnuts and coffee surely tasted 
good. The 1924 Carnival was a huge success ! 

On Friday evening, the eighth of February, 
the Studio Club had an enjoyable sleigh ride 
to Wellesley. We left after lecture, stopped 
at the Blue Dragon Tea Room for a delicious 
supper and returned at ten o'clock. 

The Studio Club celebrated St. Valentine's 
Day by having their dinner sent up to the 
studio. Hearts, Cupids and arrows abounded, 
and the interchanging of valentines made the 
evening a success. 



Plans for Lasell's annual Easter Tour to 
Washington are "on". Miss Potter and the 
girls expect to leave Lasell, March 28, return- 
ing April 4. Old girls and their friends are 
cordially invited to join the party anywhere 
along the journey. 

Lasell is also planning a fascinating Euro- 
pean Trip for this summer. Particulars will 
be given in a later issue of the Leaves. 



THE PROGRESSIVE DINNER 

"A cold wind, snow flurries, and no change 
in temperature," was the weather-man's decree 
for the evening of Saturday, January 26th, 
1924. But weather matters not to Lasell girls, 
when food is in view ; so five o'clock found the 
four Senior houses opening their doors (not 
literally) to the school. Clark began the pro- 



cession with its soup and littley whistles 
marked with the well-known '24. From there 
we went to Gardner, where we had divine 
chicken salad and potato chips, both dear to 
our hearts. At Carpenter we found ice-cream 
and cookies ; and Hawthorne, with its steam- 
ing coffee, was a welcome place after the cold. 
So with our tickets, marked with the check of 
each house (try and get away with anything) 
we went to Main. Here our energetic Seniors 
were selling fudge. We knew we were going 
to have fudge. We had smelled it deliciously 
all Friday, and we were ready to eat it. No 
one can say that the Seniors don't do things 
right; we had a gorgeous "show" besides our 
dinner. 

Carpenter was first and with Miss Dudley as 
interpreter, the act began. Ruth Johnson, as 
the dreaming old gentleman in his library, had 
a book review : Huckleberry Finn, the Little 
Minister, Vanity Fair, Lord Fauntleroy, Bab 
the Sub-deb, and many others trooped in. We 
liked it all, and we liked it the more because 
they themselves had a good time doing it. 

Hawthorne came next and who of us can 
say that we have never been to a movie where 
some harassed mamma with two squirming 
youngsters has not been noticeably present. 
K. Knox looked as annoyed and as patiently 
resigned, as we have seen many other mammas 
look ; Doris Woodruff and Helen Terry had no 
trouble in showing us what nuisances children 
can be. Billie Chase was the old man, who is 
invariably there, reading aloud the sub-titles. 
And Miriam Ellsworth was the cold, proud 
lady, who refuses to lend a sympathetic ear to 
the old man's enthusiasm. This was followed 
by a "Romantic Tragedy". The cast all died 
and with such beautiful groans that we felt 
proud to know such actors. 

Clark furnished the theatrical part of the 
evening. Matilda Daugherty, a good-looking 
gentleman in bath-robe and with the proverbial 
pipe, fell asleep in an armchair, after he had 
been entertaining himself with love letters be- 
ginning in the year one of his life. Ruth Stone- 
man, his winsome grammar school playmate, 
with long curls, school books and apple ; Betty 



LASELL LEAVES 



17 



Barden, a typical goloshed flapper ; Alice Wry, 
sweet, simple and girlish; Bobby Niday, an in- 
tellectual, begoggled young woman; and the 
gorgeous vampire, Toots Ehrhart, came back 
to haunt his dreams. But to the grand chorus 
and dance of "Good-bye Girls", he dismissed 
them all ; the only one remaining was the 
sweet, white-robed bride, who, in everyday life, 
is Elsie Terhune. 

And then we danced, and danced, and 
danced some more. But all good things must 
end, and we had to go home, to bed, even 
though we had been out to dinner and to the 
theater. 



ATHLETIC NOTES 

Our team went to Boston, January 16, to 
play the Posse girls at basket-ball. Our girls 
made a very good showing for the first game. 
It ended with a score of 66-6 in favor of Posse. 

The first of a series of three games between 
Juniors and Seniors was played Tuesday, Jan- 



uary 24, in our gym. The class spirit shown 
was very noticeable and. we hope that it will 
continue in the other games. The Seniors won 
by a score of 23-9. 

January 31 the faculty challenged the Lasell 
Varsity. The game was enjoyed by many spec- 
tators. The Varsity won, although the faculty 
put up a good battle. 

The line-up was as follows : 

Faculty Varsity 

L. F. — Miss Lane M. Greenough — L. F. 

R. F.— Miss Fenno L. McGee— R. F. 

C. Chamberlain 

L. G. — Miss Shapleigh D. Redman — L. G. 

R. G. — Miss Harrison S. Barnum — R. G. 

S. C. — Miss Farrar E. Robbins — S. C. 

B. Cushing 
C. — L. Robson E. Clendenin — C. 

Referee — Fran Badger. 

Edith Clendenin has recently been elected 
Captain of our Varsity team, and Lydia Parry, 
Manager. 




A BASKET BALL CAME 



18 



LASELL LEAVES 



WHITE MOUNTAIN TRIP 

Friday morning, February 15, found a 
group of sixty-five under the chaperonage of 
Mrs. Saunders and Senora Orozco, starting 
off for the White Mountains. 

At the North Station several girls from the 
Chamberlayne School joined the party, in- 
creasing our number to seventy-five. Daddy 
and Mrs. Bassett boarded the train at Haver- 
hill and after our welcoming song, he renewed 
acquaintance with the old girls ; and it did not 
take long for the new girls to become ac- 
quainted with him. 

Upon reaching Intervale we found a large 
sleigh waiting to take us to the .hotel. Then 
there was a mad rush for the rooms where 
knickers and the rest of the outfit were donned. 
Skiing and tobogganing followed and though 
many a bump was received no one seemed to 
care. We were very sorry that soon after our 
arrival, Irene Higgins was injured skiing, but 
we must compliment her on her wonderful 
pluck and good sportsmanship. 

The sound of sleigh-bells was heard coming 
from the direction of the barn, and every one 
rushed out, ready to go trailing. This was the 
most fun of all, even though we did get thrown 
off the toboggans and ducked in the snow sev- 
eral times. 

We certainly cannot forget our sleigh ride 
to Jackson in the clear, frosty air, with appe- 
tites unusually keen when we returned. 

Saturday night the large sleighs were taken 
out again; and we all enjoyed a lovely moon- 
light ride to North Conway, where we attended 
the movies. "Pep" was right at home at the 
piano. There was much applause when we 
recognized the first picture on the screen as 
that of Dr. Winslow. 

Sunday we went on a trip to Mt. Surprise 
on snowshoes. Never have we seen such a 
beautiful sight as the wonderful view of the 
Presidential Range from the top of this moun- 
tain. That afternoon we all had. a group pic- 
ture taken, and all the small cameras were 
brought out for snapshots. In the evening we 
stopped in the midst of our gaiety and gath- 



ered in the parlor for a short Vesper service. 

It was certainly a sleepy looking crowd that 
crawled out at five-thirty Monday morning, 
to start back to Auburndale ; but every one 
voted it a wonderful week-end and all are 
ready to go again next year. 



THE SOPHOMORE-SENIOR PARTY 

Who doesn't like parties ? And this one, on 
February 9th, was a particularly nice one. In 
the first place, the Woodland dining-room 
looked gorgeous, with its two banners hung at 
the end of the room — the glorious black and 
white and a gorgeous green and white. Long 
streamers of crepe paper formed a canopy, 
and around the door and over the banners, 
were clusters of green and black and white 
balloons. And the music ! A really orchestra 
of three gentlemen! We had littley dance 
orders, green and white candies, and fluffy 
little paper crackers to tie to our wrists, with 
a surprise in each one. Some one said that 
serpentine is the climax to every successful 
party. We had lots of it ! It gives such an 
air of joyous revelry. Later in the evening 
the Sophomores served sandwiches and ice 
cream. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Mr. and Mrs. 
Towne and Miss Potter chaperoned us. We 
danced till the dizzy hour of half past ten, 
and when lights were dimmed and the fare- 
well songs were sung, we all decided that it 
had been an extra divine party and. that we 
loved our Sophomores a lot. 



HONOR CREDITS 

Congratulations i Well deserved for those 
among us who have distinguished themselves 
by receiving honor credits and honorable men- 
tion at the end of this first term. 

The following names appear upon the Honor 
Roll: 

Jocelyn Tong, Three Honor Credits 

Leonore Belber, Three Honor Credits 

Isabel Varney, Two Honor Credits 

Pauline Gagne, Two Honor Credits 

Juliet Warren, Two Honor Credits 



LASELL LEAVES 



19 



HONORABLE MENTION 
Recommended in Nine Points 
Barbara Gushing 
Hazel Small 
Gertrude Kendall 
Eight Points 
Sarah Barnum 
Seven Points 
Victoria Jackson 
Elizabeth Frick 
Sylvia Starr 
Blanche Avery 
Eighty-three names handed in as recom- 
mended in some subjects. 



WOODLAND PARK NOTES 

The Christmas Holidays were rather jolly 
at Woodland Park. Fine Christmas trees were 
loaded with gifts for good and happy children 
on Christmas morning. Lucy Benejam and 
Gwendolyn McDonald were here during the 
holidays and welcomed the girls back on Janu- 
ary 7th. 

We welcome four new girls to our day- 
school department : 

Edith and Helena Follett, of Auburndale. 

Nancy Glaser, of Chestnut Hill. 

Sue Mauldin, of Chestnut Hill. 

January 11. Many of our girls attended the 
afternoon lecture at Lasell and enjoyed hear- 
ing about the beautiful old California Mis- 
sions. 

January 16. Accompanied by Miss Strang, 
the Junior High girls "hiked" to Newton- 
Lower Falls. Weren't those "hot dogs" good ! 

January 19. Mrs. Johnson of New Britain, 
Conn., spent the day with her niece, Marion 
Walter. Mrs. Johnson is an old Lasell girl, 
Aleda Walter, (1900-1901) and was glad to 
see her old school again. She called on Dr. 
and Mrs. Winslow and visited Bragdon Hall 
and Carpenter Hall. Mrs. Johnson was de- 
lighted to find her former English teacher, 
Miss Witherbee, at Bragdon. Mrs. Johnson 
has promised all her nieces to Woodland Park 
and Lasell. 

January 26. Mr. and Mrs. Perley Law- 
rence visited their daughters, Hazel andMaxine. 



January 23 and 24 were gala days, safe 
and good skating. Our teachers left all other 
engagements to take the girls to Ware's Cove, 
down the river. On the second, day, Mrs. 
Towle, visiting her daughter Mona, went to 
the Cove, and gave the girls an exhibition of 
very fine skating. 

January 23. Victoria Jackson (W. P. '23), 
Marjorie Winslow, Gwendolyn McDonald, 
and Katherine Braithwaite were on the Musi- 
cal Program at a "Tea" at Mrs. Braithwaite's. 

January 24. We do not like to have Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow go away; but we do like one of 
the results of their going, a visit from Priscilla 
Winslow. Priscilla spent January 24-26 at 
Woodland Park. Mrs. Rowbotham of New 
Orleans was the guest at dinner of her daugh- 
ter, Ruth. 

Mrs. McDonald entertained the resident 
Lasell and Woodland, teachers at "Junior 
House". 

January 25. The Woodland Park girls 
were delighted to hear Mr. Harold Vinol read 
some of his poems at Bragdon Hall. 

January 26. Mrs. McDonald, Miss Elder- 
kin, and Miss Strang attended the Private 
Schools Association at the Brimmer School in 
Boston. The speaker was Miss Helen Park- 
hurst, who spoke at length on her Dalton 
Laboratory Plans. 

January 28. Our pianoforte students at- 
tended The Young People's Symphony Concert 
in Symphony Hall, Boston. Mrs. Goodrich had 
explained the Symphony and other numbers of 
the program to our girls on the previous day, 
playing the themes and familiarizing them with 
the whole program. 

February 2. The Geography classes of the 
6th, 7th, and 8th Grades heard Mr. Burton 
Holmes give his lecture on "Switzerland" at 
Symphony Hall in Boston. The younger girls 
are very grateful to Mrs. Driscoll, who offers 
her car and chauffeur for so many of our 
concert trips. 

One of our small girls listened to the read- 
ing of some "free verse." "What is it?" she 
inquired. "It cannot be poetry, for it does 
not rhyme ; and it stops in the middle." 



20 



LASELL LEAVES 



THE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Below is the list of those who have already 
contributed, to the Endowment Fund of the 
Seminary either by special gifts or through 
pledges. Each year we hope to add to our 
list, believing that in this way we shall event- 
ually have a large number of contributors — ■ 
some of whom may later be glad to make 
special gifts either by will or otherwise. A 
pledge card is enclosed for your convenience 
if you have not yet subscribed and desire to 
do so at this time. 

We appreciate very greatly the help of those 
who have started our Lasell Endowment 
Fund, and we know that there are many more 
who will gladly join in this work of service 
to future Lasell students, when it comes to 
their attention at a favorable time. 

The amount asked, of each is only five dol- 
lars yearly because we hope for a large num- 
ber of contributors, and it is understood, of 
course, that any one who pledges and later 
finds it necessary to withdraw is quite at lib- 
erty to do so. Aiding worthy students is a 
splendid investment and we have many more 
calls than we can meet. For the most part our 
fund is used to help students who are willing 
to serve as waitresses or office helpers in order 
to earn a part of their own way, and who 
without this aid could, not have the advantage 
of training at Lasell. 



ENDOWMENT AND SCHOLARSHIP 
FUNDS 

Jeremiah Clark $1,000.00 

Class of 1857 5,010.00 

1861 100.00 

1863 200.00 

1867 8,800.00 

1880 10.00 

1883 60.00 

1893 5.00 

1894 119.00 

1897 85.00 

1898 15.00 

1899 20.00 

1902 10.00 

1903 10.00 
1905 5.00 



Class of 1906 


$5.00 


1907 


5.00 


1908 


205.00 


1909 


10 00 


1910 


50.00 


1911 


45.00 


1912 


65.00 


1914 


93.00 


1915 


5.00 


1916 


15.00 


1917 


5.00 


1918 


55.00 


1919 


15.00 


1920 


5.00 


1921 


343.00 


1922 


2,270.00 


1923 


2,070.00 


Student's Aid General 


160.09 


Student's Aid Lasell 


50.00 


B. C. Martin 


25.00 


G. M. Winslow 


5,240.00 


Chicago Club 


5.00 


N. Y. Lasell Club 


7.00 


Omaha and Council Bluffs Club 


125.00 




$26,322.09 


PLEDGES AND CONTRIBUTIONS FOR 


LASELL ENDOWMENT 


Class of '57 Fund 




Fannie Sykes Davis 




Charlotte A. K. Bancroft 




Class of '61 Fund , 




Caroline Hills Leeds 




Class of '63 Fund 




In Memory of Ida Capron 


Cook 


Class of '67 Fund 




Angeline C. Blaisdell 




Class of '80 Fund 




Lillie R. Potter 




Class of '83 Fund 





Cora Cogswell 
Lillian M. Packard 
Lydia Wadhams 
Stella Wadhams 
Annie Wallace 
Lina Maynard Bramhall 
Class of '93 Fund 

Jessie Gaskill Wheelock 



LASELL LEAVES 



21 



Class of '94 Fund 

Jennie M. Rich 

Harriet G. Scott 
Class of '96 Fund 

Josephine Chandler Pierce 
Class of '97 Fund 

Nora Burroughs Dillingham 

Edith Howe Kip 

Gertrude Taggart 

And others 
Class of '98 Fund 

Emma Aull Duncan 

Jane Myrick Gibbs 

Clara Davis Lounsbury 

Caroline Kendall Putnam 
Class of '99 Fund 

Evelyn Ebert Allen 

Ethelyn Prentice Knight 

Elise Scott Mackintosh 

Alice Jenckes Wilson 
Class of '02 Fund 

Annie Mae Pinkham Allyn 

Cornelia Douglass Houser 

Edith McClure Patterson 

Clara McLean Rowley 
Class of '03 Fund 

Bertha Hayden King 

Mary Goodwin Olmstead 
Class of '05 Fund 

Ida R. Jones 
Class of '06 Fund 

Maude Simes Harding 

Helen Carter Marcy 
Class of '07 Fund 

Clara Nims 
Class Of '08 Fund 

Lela H. Goodall 

Louise W. Morrell 

In Memory of Madeline Lovitt 
Class of '09 Fund 

Louise Funkhouser Colegrove 

Florence Swartwout Thomassen 
Class of '10 Fund 

Mildred Goodall Campbell 
Class of '11 Fund 

Margaret Jones Clemen 

Gladys Lawton 

Mary A. Ordway 



Louise Mayer Scheim 
Class of '12 Fund 

Annie Merrill David 

Esther Morey Hain 

Florence Jones 

Marion Joslin Oppenheimer 
Class of '14 Fund 

Mildred Hotchkiss Girvin 

Dora E. Goodwillie 
Class of '15 Fund 

Susan E. Tiffany 
Class of '16 Fund 

Maude Hayden 

Helen Merrill Strohecker 
Class of '17 Fund 

Jessie Shepherd 
Class of '18 Fund 

Lydia Adams 

Dorothy C. Barnes 

Helene Davenport Bowman 

Cornelia Gaty 

Barbara McLellan 

Ruth Newcomb 

Anita Hotchkiss Scott 
Class of '19 Fund 

Carolyn Kuhn Feffer 

Ethel Ramage Fisk 

Deborah Ingraham 

Mercie Nichols 
Class of '20 Fund 

Muriel James Morrison 
Class of '21 Fund 

Helen L. Beede 

Leonora Conklin 

Marion Bodwell Lesher 
Class of '22 Fund 

Leilya K. Barkman 

Iverna Birdsall 

Cornelia Hemingway 

Lucile Pfeifer 

Mabel E. Rawlings 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hemingway 
Class of '23 Fund 

Elizabeth Buettner 

Helen Buettner 

Dorothy Chase 

Carolyn S. Colton 

Josephine Curry 



22 



LASELL LEAVES 



Lucy Fuller 

Florence Gifford 

Ruth Hills 

Helen Hinshaw 

Ruth Hopkins 

Ida Markert 

Jeannette Merrick 

Elizabeth Mitchell 

Claire Parker 

Helen Phillips 

Louise Puckett 

Mercedes Rendell 

Ruth Throm Rogers 

Evelyn Shidler 

Florence Boehmcke Simes 

Adrienne Smith 

Winnifrede Stackpole 

Mary Eugenia Swift 

Jessie Watters 

Doris Wilde 

Benjamin F. Mitchell 



General Endowment Fund 

Mabel Hamlin Barby 

Ruth Talcott Britton 

Bessie L. Comstock 

Laura R. Comstock 

Susan Hallock Couch 

Ethel Hook 

Julia Funkhouser Mellin 

Gertrude Gleason Shepard 

Ellery C. Wright 
Chicago Club Fund 

Bertha Hax Auld 
Guy M. Winslow Fund 

Mrs. G. M. Winslow 

Dr. G. M. Winslow 
There are some Class and Memorial Funds 
of which we do not know the names of all 
the donors. Some student aid is also given by 
the income from the Caroline Carpenter Me- 
morial Fund and from the treasury of the 
Alumnae Association. 




GARDNER GROUP OF SENIORS 



LASELL LEAVES 



23 



LASELL CLUB NOTES 



THE MIDWINTER REUNION 

It was a perfect clay for our midwinter re- 
union held February 11, at the old school. One 
hundred and ten guests enjoyed Lasell's gener- 
ous hospitality. Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Miss 
Potter, and our alumnae president, Evelyn 
Schmidt, were in the receiving line. The com- 
mittee made the dining-room and reception- 
rooms bright with spring flowers. 

At luncheon the Lasell Glee Club sang a 
delightful welcome to the "old girls" and sev- 
eral snappy, up-to-date school songs. Follow- 
ing the cordial word of greeting from our 
President, Miriam Nelson Flanders, '05, pre- 
sented to the Seminary in the name of her class 
and in memory of her class mate, Martha Has- 
kell Clark, a beautiful oil painting, a charming 
bit of the White Mountains, the inscription 
bearing this message : "To Lasell in loving 
memory of our friend and president, Martha 
Haskell Clark, 1885-1922, from the Class of 
1905. 'Who has not loved a mountain, — he has 
not known a friend.' " M. H. C. 

Mrs. Statira P. McDonald, Preceptress of 
the Woodland Park School, in a few words 
gave a happy hint as to the unique educational 
methods introduced by Mr. Towne, the Prin- 
cipal, and also referred, to the rapid and grati- 
fying growth of our junior school. 

Dr. Winslow's word was just what the old 
girls liked most to hear, very personal messages 
from former students to their Principal. He 
also spoke of his encouragement over the 
steady growth of the Endowment Fund. At 
the urgent request of the committee the Presi- 
dent gave a sketch of her personal experiences 
on the Labrador where she spent last summer 
as one of Dr. Grenfell's aides. 

Dr. Winslow reminded the old girls that this 
is Dr. Bragdon's and Professor Hills' fiftieth 
anniversary and urged us all to return to the 
Seminary in June and join in some fine celebra- 
tion befitting this year of jubilee. The Secre- 
tary was requested to send a word of loving 
greeting to Dr. and Mrs. Bragdon. Unfortu- 



nately a delay in the mails brought Dr. Brag- 
don's message to the alumnae too late for the 
meeting, but we are delighted to send it to our 
old girls through the school paper. 

Mary Quick Dean, 
Secretary Pro Tern. 
February 6, 1924. 

Those present were: Lillian M. Packard 
'83, Delia Hancock Clegg 1866-7, Genevra 
Strong Harlow 1905-6, Winifred Smith Cham- 
bers 1905-6, Elizabeth Robinson Breed 1917- 
18, Jessie J. MacMillan '82, Carrie Warren 
Smith 1888-9, Clara Parker Colby '12, Hattie 
Greenleaf Smith 1887, Annie Judson Hanni- 
gan 1882-4, Georgia Duncan Seavey '02, Bes- 
sie Fuller Perry '02, Blanche C. Martin, Kath- 
erine Dearborn Wingate '16, Nell Woodward 
Collins '15, Gertrude Watson Linscott '99, 
Sophie Hall Wheeler 1896-8, Elisabeth White- 
head Batson 1896-7, Harriett G. Scott '94, 
Margaret Fuller Manchester '06, Helen Darl- 
ing Tillinghast '05, Miriam Nelson Flanders 
'05, Evelyn C. Schmidt '14, Margaret Haskell, 
Mary Quick Dean '14, Emma J. Totten, Elsie 
Lloyd Doleman '14, Marietta Rose Green '86, 
Mary Merrill Savage 1881-3, Mildred Smith 
Leach '14, Barbara Vail Bosworth '05, Con- 
stance E. Blackstock '09, Gladness Blethen 
Daniels 1906-8, Barbara McLellan '18, Annie 
Dimond Day '18, Louise Woolley '23, Ruth 
Hopkins '23, Helen Hinshaw '23, Adrienne 
Smith '23, Elizabeth Neal '23, Louise Puckett 
'23, Frances Buchanan '22, Barbara Smith '22, 
Mabel Rutledge 1917-18, Adelyn Pearce 1917- 
18, Elizabeth Peirce Bittenbend.er 1904-6, Jane 
Ford Amesbury 1901-3, Mabelle H. Whitney 
'03, Dorothy I. Burnham '20, Mildred Free- 
man 1917-20, Alice Phillips Weeks '19, Muriel 
James Morrison '20, Harriette Case '22, Julia 
Rankin '20, Marguerite Hardy Chandler '20, 
Ruth Hay den '20, Elizabeth Linn Manness '13, 
Frances Harris Spear '16, Mabel Straker Kim- 
ball '16, Eleanor L. Knight '22, Ruth H. Ord- 
way '21, Ethel B. Hook 1901-3, Sarah Hughes 
Forbes '03, Anna Andrews Barris 1901-2, 



24 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mildred Strain Nutter '17, Marjorie Morrison 
Coburn '17, E. Gertrude Allen '17, Marian A. 
Brown '22, Ruth G. Spoffard 1919-20. 



DR. BRAGDON'S LETTER 

I don't quite see why you care to have a 
word from your old Principal when you have 
Dr. Winslow and Miss Potter to sing the 
glories of the present Lasell and its brilliant 
achievements of to-day! But I am glad to be 
remembered and given the opportunity to send 
my loving greetings to the faithful ones who 
are present at the Midwinter Reunion. I wish 
I could take you each by the hand and look into 
your eyes and bid you Godspeed ! 

Don't fail to find us if you ever come to this 
"Crown of the Valley" ! A warm welcome 
awaits you ! 

Mame Seaman and Louise Whitney Weaver 
have just been here to consult about the South- 
ern California Lasell Club Luncheon which 
occurs on March 11th, the second Tuesday in 
March, as decreed some years ago. Mame Sea- 
man is President for 1924, and Louise is her 
crony. Two fine women they are, busy, capa- 
ble, and useful. A pity they didn't graduate, 
for it would be to the credit of Lasell to num- 
ber such women among its graduates. But 
they are the same as graduates to me, dear 
and sweet girls, as well as stunning women. 

Another such is May Church Cottle, who 
called lately, bringing her daughter, Mrs. Wm. 
R. Gibbons, who is a credit to her mother, and 
the dear little daughter of Mrs. Gibbons whom 
one ached to cuddle and kiss. So May Church 
is a grandma already. How time goes ! ! An- 
other day came Mrs. Leon E. Sandos, who was 
Nellie Briggs, and Mrs. A. V. D. Rousseau, 
who was Ellen Campbell, both faithful and 
worthy Lasellians. 

It is a matter of pride to me that we have 
so many fine women among our former pupils ! 

Then another is Eula Lee, Mrs. R. D. Mer- 
rill, of Seattle, who was here for a little while 
(with her husband and two daughters) and 
was kind enough to call. Seattle is safe as 
long as Eula is there ! 

Ina Scott Bryant and Mr. Bryant, formerly 
of Amarillo, Texas, are now settled in their 



house at 1801 Vista Street, Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia. 

I hear that Gladys Lawton is in Pasadena, 
but she has not called, yet. 

C. C. Bragdon. 



THE PHILADELPHIA LASELL CLUB 
LUNCHEON 

At half-past twelve on January twenty-fifth, 
Lasell girls began gathering at the Bellevue- 
Stratford in Philadelphia for the Luncheon of 
the Philadelphia Lasell Club. This club was 
formed a year ago with Jennie Hamilton Elia- 
son '04 President, Lois Brader Buchner '14 
Vice-President, and Annie Merrill David '12 
Secretary and Treasurer. Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low were guests of the club at this, their second 
meeting. After an opportunity for greetings 
and reunions, a company of twenty-five sat 
down to a long table attractively decorated with 
greens, pink and white lilies, and freesia. A 
delicious luncheon was served amid lively con- 
versation of old times and new. At the busi- 
ness meeting, the present officers were con- 
tinued for another year. A constitution, pre- 
sented by Dorothy Payne Whiteway '14, 
chairman of the committee on constitution, 
was adopted. Helen Leavitt Aiken was 
appointed chairman of a nominating 
committee. Mrs. Winslow was called 
upon to speak. She brought greetings 
from the school and told of some of the present 
day events. Dr. Winslow followed with an 
account of changes in the faculty and the pres- 
ent prosperous condition of the Seminary. 
Greetings were sent to Dr. Bragdon, and ac- 
companied by Lois Brader Buchner at the 
piano, all rose and sang Alma Mater. 

The following were present: 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Jennie Hamilton 
Eliason '04, Rebecca Eliason Vickers (1902- 
3), Grace Rowe Vail '05, Ruth Throm Rogers 
'23, Rosamond K. Kent (1918-20), Madeline 
Sheldon Herfurth '16, Eleanor L. McCarty 
'16, Dorothy Crane Crowe '16, Jessie C. Shep- 
herd '17, Carleen Home Brooke (1917-18), 
Edith Hobson Fricke '17, Elizabeth K. Carlile 
'17, Dorothy Payne Whiteway '14, Lois 
Brader Buchner '14, Una Wise Haas (1911- 



LASELL LEAVES 



25 



13), Nina Dietz Hanvood '11, Annie Merrill 
David '12, Rachel E. Chambers (1910-11), 
Teanette Ritter Heller (1909-10), Elsie Leon- 
ard (1908-9), Ruth Balch Ott (1907-9), Helen 
Leavitt Aiken (1905-6), Anna G. Wood 
(1914-15), Marion Mann Miles '02, Katherine 
Mason Fernald '99. 



THE NEW YORK LASELL CLUB 
LUNCHEON 

The New York Lasell Club met at Hotel 
Pennsylvania on January 26th, the day follow- 
ing the Philadelphia Club Luncheon, and as 
usual, had a large and enthusiastic company 
present. There were Lasell graduates and 
students from thirty or more years ago to the 
youngest alumnae of the class of 1923, about 
seventy-five in all. 

At the luncheon following the very social in- 
formal reception, the girls were seated at tables 
according to their years at school. At the 
table with the President, Mildred Hall Leber 
'12, were Dr. and Mrs. Winslow and sixteen 
of the students of the years from '88 to '99. At 
a table in the center of the room were fifteen 
of the girls of the last three years. They added 
much to the enjoyment and Lasell spirit of the 
occasion by singing Lasell songs between the 
courses. The girls of the years between were 
seated at round tables about the center table. 
The new officers elected were Carol Case Den- 
nison '99 President, Mary Fenno Stirn '13 
Vice-President, and Hannah Bingaman '14 
Secretary and Treasurer. Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low were each invited to speak, and the very 
successful 1924 reunion of the New York La- 
sell Club adjourned with the singing of Alma 
Mater. 

The following were present : 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Violet Comley '22, 
Helen Moss '19, Virginia Walter '22, Arline 
xAilsopp '23, Jeanette Merrick '23, Josephine 
Curry '23, Florence Boehmcke Simes '23, Mer- 
cedes Rendell '23, Thirza J. Abrams '21, Nell 
West '21, Dorothea L. Droege (1919-22), 
Grace Warner Strickland '21, Leonore F. 
Conklin '21, Marjorie Gifford Grimm '22, 
Cornelia M. Hemingway '22, Anna G. Wood 



(1914-15), M. Hannah Bingaman '14, Susan 
Griggs Wilson (1881-4), Katharine Bingaman 
Heron '15, Dorothy E. Shank (Teacher), 
Charlotte Swartwout '14, Mildred Hotchkiss 
Girvin '14, Edith Allen Thayer '99, Grace C. 
Huntington '89, Maudie L. Stone '88, Susan 
Hallock Couch (1886-8), Annie M. Gwinnell 
'88, M. Alice Fuller (1895-6), Eva 
Ferris Foote (1895-8), Margaret Bailey 
Krause (1896-8), Maude Mayo Bentz '98, 
Ethel Lasell Decker (1895-7), Ada Cadmus 
McCoy '98, Mollie Taylor Rathbun (1890-4), 
Mabel Case Viot '94, Nellie Feagles Kattelle 
'97, Evelyn Ebert Allen '99, Carol Case Denni- 
son '99, Gladys Patterson Hill '04, Julia De 
Witt Read TO, Edna Rogers Carlisle '05, 
Laura Simonds (1902-4), Ella Hazelton Rus- 
sell '04, Virginia Tabler Boomhower (1900-2), 
Eleanor Thompson '20, Gladys Lucas '21, 
Edna Lucas Bernhard (1914-15), Florence 
Swartwout Thomassen '09, Lucy Russell 
Webb (1908-10), Anita Hotchkiss Scott '18, 
Huldah Halley '18, Ruth Balch Ott (1907-9), 
Elsie Leonard (1908-9), Ada Wood Peterson 
(1905-6), Jennie Hamilton Eliason '04, Jessie 
Shepherd '17, Virginia Lee '11, Edith Harris 
Seward (1899-01), Cornelia Gaty '18, Gladys 
Stults (1909-10), Mabel C. Gleason '23, Mil- 
dred Hall Leber '12, Helene Wiedenmayer 
Kleinhaus (1899-00), Helen Moss (1919-20), 
Jennie Leventhal Brooks (1915-16), Kather- 
ine Forgie Holman '20, Anna L. Conant '09, 
Ruth Watson Garvin (1918-19), Louise Lucas 
Grant (1912-14), Margaret Reid Perry '22, 
Sophie Barrett '14, Grace G. Garland Ether- 
ington (1878-80), Dorothy Payne Whiteway 
'14, Louise Morrell '09, Kathryn Patterson 
(1916-18). 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ITEMS 

Dr. Bragdon's always welcome and as usual 
newsy letter reads as follows : 

"Mae Chisholm Brown (1903-4) made us a 
very welcome call the other day. She looked 
and acted well. She and. Mr. Brown and the 
two children are living at Costa Mesa, Cali- 
fornia, now, Mr. Brown having a dairy farm 
near with seventy-five cows. Some dairy that. 



26 



LASELL LEAVES 



Mae is doing fine work in connection with the 
Spanish-American Boys' School at Gardena of 
whose splendid service with Mexican boys I 
have formerly written you. 

"Sarah Homes Ford (1876-7) called but I 
was away. Sorry. She came to Lasell from 
Wisconsin, has a bright looking son in busi- 
ness in Los Angeles. 

"Met Elsie Crowell (1919-20) on the street. 
She and Elizabeth Russell (1919-20) 'did' 
Europe last summer. 'Had a splendid trip.' 

"Nellie Briggs Sandos (1895) and Helen 
Campbell Rousseau (1898-9) called. The good 
girls call on their old Principal ! ! Nellie has 
two boys, one twenty years old, the other 
seventeen, and Helen three children. Think of 
it! 

"Katherine Jenckes Knox '04 called. Her 
husband is in the Navy — Commander or Admi- 
ral, I doubt not. So as to be near him she is 
to live at Long Beach until June. Funny how 
they like to be near their 'men' ! 

"Lela Goodall '08 telephoned. The family is 
at 7600 Hollywood Boulevard, in the house Mr. 
Goodall built for them last winter. Quite a 
stretch from Sanford, Maine, to Hollywood ! I 
wish they had built in Pasadena. Perhaps Lela 
is planning to go into the movies? If so, Hol- 
lywood is the place. 

"I have received the November number of 
that deservedly popular magazine, 'The Lasell 
Leaves' and have refreshed my three-folded- 
ness by means of it. 

"First Fold. Its mechanical execution is 
good. Your printer is to be thanked — or your 
business manager, who, by the way, is one of 
my Girls' girl. I congratulate you, Elizabeth, 
first on choosing so fine a mother; second, on 
writing your name with a z and not an s. How 
well I remember your splendid grandfather in 
the old Boston days ! 

"Second Fold. The fine 'Personals' — who- 
ever wrote them knows how to say similar 
things in various ways so they do not tire the 
reader by sameness. This is quite a knack let 
me tell you. When — years ago — I used to write 
them, I made one heading for each class, 'En- 
gaged', 'Married', 'Births', 'Deaths', then 



put the names and dates. You see that was a 
lazy way, but it saved many words. This is 
better. 

"Third Fold. The goodly list of advertise- 
ments. That is an essential if one wants the 
paper to pay its way. Maude Oliver '89 — bless 
her — now, or the last I knew, Mrs. Harding 
of East Saugus, was the first publisher to get 
enough advertising to pay expenses. Send her 
a copy of the paper in which you print this, if 
you do print it, of which I am uncertain, for 
it has become so long ! 

"Shall I offend some nice girl if I say I like 
the old plain, title page? I am not 'much on 
splashes.' 

"Is Newton now a part of Boston?" 



This is certainly delightful news for Lasell 
from Caroline Lindsay Haney, '20. She 
writes to our Principal of a recent meeting of 
the Portland Lasell girls at which a Portland 
Club was formed and the officers are as fol- 
lows : Caroline Lindsay Haney, '20, President ; 
Flora Harrison Clifford, Vice-President ; 
Marion Stevens, '21, Treasurer; and Eliza- 
beth Stephens, '20, Secretary. To those at 
Lasell who know these girls, this seems to be 
a strong company. It is easy to predict a 
successful future for the new club. Caroline 
also writes Betty Stephens has been spending 
the week with her. Some other member of 
our faculty also heard of Betty's week with 
Caroline during which the little dietitian pre- 
pared all the desserts for the family, and "they 
were delicious." At that first meeting, we 
will all be interested to learn that the fol- 
lowing girls were present : Marion and Louise 
Stevens, Lois Perry, Frances Coombs, Flora 
Harrison Clifford, Betty Stephens, and Cassie 
Lindsay. 

She speaks of seeing her former nurse, Miss 
Cox, now Mrs. Swasey, and tells us that she 
has a darling child, is happily married, and 
living in Berlin, New Hampshire. She also 
keeps in touch with Katharine Tufts and Amy 
Tuthill Smith and other Lasell girls, and 
closes with an urgent invitation for Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow to visit her. 



LASELL LEAVES 



27 




In the spirit of rejoicing with those who 
rejoice, we herewith record, the names of La- 
sell's very latest happy brides and grooms, not 
omitting from the glad list, recent engagement 
announcements. 

On Thursday, the twelfth of July, Florence 
Boehmcke, '23, became the bride of Mr. Regi- 
nald J. Simes at Plainfield, New Jersey. 

Sylvia Bregman, '20, and Mr. Ernest A. 
Klein were united in marriage, in Chicago, the 
sixteenth of January. 

Lucille Eichengreen, '22, chose the nine- 
teenth day of January for her marriage to Mr. 
Joseph Leopold Block. 

Tuesday, January twenty-second, was the 
wedding day of Elsie CrowelL (1919-20) 
when she became the bride of Mr. Benjamin 
J. Bennett, Jr. 

Margaret Jones, '11, and Mr. Rudolph A. 
Clemen were married, in Evanston, Illinois, on 
Saturday, December twenty-ninth. Mr. and 
Mrs. Clemen will be at home at 86 Kenney 
Street, Evanston, after the first of March. 

On Thursday, the twentieth of December, 
Katharine Bingaman, '15, and Mr. John Heron 
were united in marriage in Plainfield, New 
Jersey. 

Word has been received of the engagement 
of Antoinette Merritt, '23, to Mr. Everett 
Bromley. 

Phyllis Maple, '22, has announced her en- 
gagement to Mr. Donald Dean McCormick. 

The announcement of the engagement of 
Elizabeth Neal, '23, to Mr. Parks Odenweller 
has been received. 

Marjorie David (1910-11) has announced 
her engagement to Mr. Harold Locke Lothrop. 



The engagement of Grace Gates, '22, to Mr. 
Wendell V. Brown has been announced. 

Old girls of Dr. Bragdon's time will rejoice 
to know that Mrs. Bragdon is convalescing 
from her long arid serious illness. 

Dr. and Mrs. Winslow are back from their 
delightful meeting with the Lasell girls of 
Philadelphia and New York. They have no 
end of pleasant "personals" concerning the old 
girls whom they met. 

Katherine Rice, '20, took dinner with us 
recently. She looked not one day older 
than when she was graduated. She told us 
of the world-wide journey which she re- 
cently made and of her sister Carol's start- 
ing on a similar round-the-world trip. How 
just like Carol it was, to teach up to the 
day of her leaving and to declare as she em- 
barked, that she would be back and at her 
work at the journey's end. This is decided- 
ly personal, but it belongs right here, to say 
of Katherine, what a delight it is to meet 
a girl whose natural personal attractions 
have not been spoiled or altered one whit 
by the changing dictates of fashion. A recent 
copy of a Detroit paper contained a snapshot 
of Katherine, taken on the deck of the 
Steamship "Samaria," as the liner was pass- 
ing through Suez Canal. The friends of these 
sisters will be interested to learn that their 
father, Mr. H. H. Rice, has been made Presi- 
dent of the Cadillac Motor Car Company of 
Detroit. 

Gertrude Linke Bennett (1914-15) and her 
five year old daughter made us a call re- 
cently. Those who saw Gertrude's dainty 
little miss declared her to be an unusually 
beautiful child. 

We were delighted to learn that Mildred 
Goodall Campbell, '10, and her family have 
moved into our neighborhood. 

Marian Owen Pollard, '19, in acknowledg- 
ing the Lasell Baby Book, speaks deservedly, 
in glowing terms, of her two lovely babies. 
Edna, two years old, and wee Harriet. She 
also adds that they are planning for these 
little daughters to attend Lasell a few years 
hence. 



28 



LASELL LEAVES 



How loyal and fine that was in Ruby 
Ryder Lyon (1900-01) to send back this 
message to our Principal : "My daughter will 
finish her high school work this spring; and 
as I am an old Lasell girl and my memories 
of Lasell are such happy and pleasant ones, 
I naturally turn to Lasell as a possible school 
for my daughter. — You may not remember 
me, Dr. Winslow, among so many ; but I 
remember you very well and hope to be 
able to place my daughter with you in your 
school, which has always stood for high 
ideals and noble womanhood." 

Cora Danforth, '07, writes from her win- 
ter home in Augusta, Georgia, asking for 
a copy of the Register of Graduates. We 
are glad to get in touch again with this dear 
graduate. 

In a very tender note from Vera I. Bush 
to our Principal, she refers to the death of 
her mother, Harriet Benedict Settle Bush 
(1881-3) which occurred nine years ago; 
but the sad news had not reached us. She 
writes, "Mother often told me of the happy 
times she had at Lasell, and the Seminary 
has my interest because she loved the place." 

Mildred C. Warren, '94, sent an unusually 
gracious message of appreciation to our 
Principal, and we wish we had permission 
and space to repeat it. She congratulates 
Dr. Winslow on the wonderfully flourishing 
condition of the Seminary and the fact that 
its scope is ever enlarging, and encloses a 
subscription for the full number of Leaves 
for the New Year. She rejoices over the 
signal success of our school under the leader- 
ship of its efficient Principal. 
' Ruth Rawlings, '21, was graduated from 
the Boston School of Physical Education last 
June and spent the summer at a girl's camp 
as councilor for land sports. Concerning 
this experience, Ruth writes, "It surely is 
great fun, and I advise every girl who 
doesn't know what camp life is, to try it." 
At present Ruth is head of the Athletic De- 
partment of the Friend School of Baltimore/ 
and is enjoying her work very much. Her 
closing words are too valuable to omit. "I 



wish I could really tell you how much Lasell 
did for me and has meant to me ; so many 
times I long to go back and repeat those 
two wonderful years." 

Charlotte Lesh, '12, has "started in school" 
again, this time attending the University of 
Indiana, specializing in the Department of 
Social Service. She speaks of a proposed 
Indiana Lasell Club but feels that they need 
Dr. and Mrs. Winslow on hand for the 
launching. Charlotte refers to her little 
nephew, Perry W. Lesh, Junior, who arrived 
on Hallowe'en night, and writes, "The Hoke 
and Lesh families are seeing to it that it 
won't be their fault if he isn't well spoiled." 
But his father and mother are very sensible, 
so we feel there will be a chance for him 
under their guidance. We wish Charlotte 
the best of success in her new venture. 

We are indebted to dear Harriet D. Mor- 
ris, '18, of Toledo for a report of the recent 
meeting of this Lasell Club. She confesses 
that they had some interruptions in start- 
ing up the club ; but after their last meeting, 
which she declares was full of "pep", the 
club is firmly launched. The new officers 
are Myra Schofield Magnuson (1908-09) 
President ; Mildred Harvey, '22, Secretary. 
Harriet writes, "I have been quite interested 
in what the other Lasell Clubs have been 
doing according to the Leaves. I believe 
each and every old Lasell girl feels the same 
as I do, that my two years at the Seminary 
are years never to be forgotten." This year 
Harriet is teaching Science in the junior 
high school of Toledo and is also taking ad- 
vanced work. "I never realized I could truly 
enjoy this line of work as I do this year." 
She closes with cordial greetings to Dr. and 
Mrs. Winslow and Miss Potter. 

Marion Joslin Oppenheimer, '12, writes 
from St. Paul, Minnesota, with all good 
wishes for Lasell for the New Year. "We 
old girls love our school and I was so happy 
to receive a copy of the Register of Lasell 
Graduates." Marion is one of the loyal 
Lasell girls who joined her classmates in 



LASELL LEAVES 



29 



expressing their interest by sending a sub- 
stantial contribution to the Endowment 
Fund. She tells us that she frequently sees 
Elizabeth House McMillan (1905-6) and Al- 
leda Burnett Arneson, '14, whose little son, 
Billy, is now just two years old; and she 
speaks of dear Katherine Wheeler's, '09, 
continued sadness over the loss of her father, 
who was her constant companion. 

All the old girls of her time will remember 
distinctly and delightfully, Lucy Aldrich 
Berston, '10. She is now the mother of 
two boys and writes that she is increas- 
ingly grateful for Lasell and for the friends 
whom she made in the school days. Much 
sickness and one death have visited her 
home, but she writes with characteristic 
bravery, "We seem to have had our share 
of trials, but we have had countless bless- 
ings, too, and I think the greatest of these 
are our friends. Every girl in school should 
realize that she can never have a better op- 
portunity to make friends than during her 
school days ; and that when she leaves 
school, she can not cherish these friendships 
too carefully. No matter whether joys or 
sorrows come later on, there is nothing that 
counts like sharing them with a friend." 

Annie Merrill David, '12, in her urgent 
invitation for Dr. and Mrs. Winslow to at- 
tend the Philadelphia Lasell Club meeting, 
adds some glad, and some sad Lasell news. 
We were pleased to learn that Clara Parker 
Colby, '12, has just moved to Newtonville 
and will be near her Lasell home. The sad 
part of Annie's letter w T as the word of the 
passing away of Edith Hobson Fricke's, '17, 
oldest son, very suddenly, after an illness of 
only a few days. Another little boy arrived 
in Edith's home only a few weeks before 
the passing of the older boy. Our sincere 
sympathy goes out to this bereaved Lasell 
girl. 

Maurine Moore Allen (1919-20) writes 
from Chicago for a copy of the Register of 
Graduates, and incidentally adds, "I always 
will be a Lasell 'booster', as one of the 
happiest years of my life I spent there." We 



appreciate this unfailing interest on the part 
of Maurine. 

Luella Dadmus Brooks, 74, writes from 
Tombstone, Arizona, and words her mes- 
sage to Dr. Winslow as follows : "Thank 
you for the Register of Lasell Graduates. 
I wish to report that although I am spend- 
ing the winter with my son in this cheer- 
fully named place (but which is a direct 
contradiction to its name) my home address 
remains the same as in the Register. Will 
try to be at Lasell next June for the fiftieth 
anniversary of my graduation." Luella en- 
closes her subscription for the Leaves. 

Mildred Hall Leber, '12, wrote to our 
Principal, recently, an unusually glad mes- 
sage. The cause for her thankfulness was 
the complete recovery of her husband, Dr. 
O. H. Leber. She closes with cordial greet- 
ings to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Miss Wither- 
bee, Mile. LeRoyer and Miss Potter, and 
with best wishes for Lasell's continued 
success. 

Edith Harber Wright, '05, sends a mes- 
sage to our Principal from Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, in which she gives the new address 
of her sister, Ina M. Harber, '06, as the 
Sovereign Hotel, 6200 Kenmore Avenue, 
Chicago. She writes, "In the number of 
the Leaves which I received soon after 
school opened, I found a great deal of news 
of old girls that I know. I always do — and 
enjoy every number." This testimony from 
Edith is much appreciated by the Personal 
Editor, and we wish all our old girls would 
take the time and interest that Edith has 
in sending back to us bits of news concern- 
ing former students. We were sorry to 
learn from Edith that Marie LeBaron An- 
drews, '06, lost her aunt with whom she had 
made her home for so many years. The 
members of Edith's class still keep up, reg- 
ularly, their round-robin letter, illustrated 
with pictures of babies and almost grown- 
ups, nearly ready for Lasell girls, as for in- 
stance Hazel Carey Adam, '05, with her 
young lady daughters. Edith writes, "We 
are enjoying California very much; espe- 



30 



LASELL LEAVES 



daily do we like Oakland and the surround- 
ings. It is beautiful. I shall look forward 
to getting my Leaves and the Register", 
and closes with very best wishes for the 
New Year to Dr. and Mrs. Winslow, Mile. 
LeRoyer, and Miss Witherbee. 

In Helen Ebersole Swartzel's (1901-2) 
letter to our Principal, she asks, "I wonder, 
if after all these years, you will remember 
me? I have always hoped to revisit my be- 
loved Lasell, but as yet no opportunity has 
ever presented itself. I married a college 
professor. We were at Ohio State Univer- 
sity for eighteen years, and then last year 
came to the University of Pittsburgh, where 
my husband is Head of the Department of 
Mathematics. My daughter graduates in 
February ." She expresses the determination 
to send her to Lasell at mid-year, and this is 
exactly what she did»do. Lasell is finding it 
easy to give a most cordial welcome to this 
dear daughter of a former Lasell girl. 

Margaret Reid Perry, '22, and Barbara 
Smith, '22, dined at Lasell during Margaret's 
week-end as Barbara's guest. We have 
never seen either of the girls in better 
health or spirits, and we find it easy to be- 
lieve that Margaret is happily married and 
that Barbara is enjoying, thoroughly, her 
advanced work in her chosen profession, 
music. 

Elizabeth Stephens, '20, and Dorothy 
Burnham, '20, very naturally came back to- 
gether for a visit at Lasell and delighted us 
by declaring they were coming again soon, 
as Betty is making a protracted visit in the 
neighborhood. 

"Cherry" Buchanan, '22, slipped into her 
old place recently, and we found it hard to 
believe that she doesn't belong to us as of 
yore. We rejoice to learn that Cherry will 
be near Lasell and in and out of the old 
school home for some time yet. 

One of the special joys of the Personal 
Editor is recording the births of these little 
Lasell girls and boys who have recently 
come to gladden the homes of our former 
students. 



On December 14, Howard Fenno Stirn 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Stirn 
(Mary Fenno Stirn, '13). 

Little Henry Roberts Burns, Jr., son of 
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Burns, (Mary R. Stark 
'18) came to gladden their home on January 
17. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Colegrove (Louise 
Funkhouser '09) announce the birth of a 
daughter Marian Louise, on the twenty-first 
of December, 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Van der Wolk 
(Edith Powell, '18) have announced the 
birth of their son, Walter William, Jr., on 
the ninth of February, 1924. 

On the thirtieth of January there was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Wolfe, (Pris- 
cilla Alden, '19) a daughter, Virginia. 

The best is none too good for the Hop- 
kins sisters ! Word has been received that 
Sarah, '19, has an appointment on the faculty 
staff of Vassar College. 

Ethel Walton Abbott, '99, is now practis- 
ing law in Winett, Montana, which she 
describes as an "oil town". Ethel was 
married sometime ago ; but for business 
reasons, uses her own initials. We wish 
her all success in her profession. 

It was most thoughtful in you, Dorothy 
Stewart Allen, to send this message, "I 
just want to extend my greetings and best 
wishes to the staff of the Lasell Leaves for 
1923-24." We thank you. Lasell still re- 
members that Dorothy was a most efficient 
editor of the Leaves in 1916-17. 

Gertrude May Goss (1897-8) tells us that 
she will soon be living in Berwick, Maine, 
where Mr. Goss is a lawyer and where 
they have built a new home. 

This is good news for Lasell : Sarah 
Hughes Forbes, '03, and Ethel B. Hook 
(1901-3) are spending the winter in Boston, 
which we hope means we shall see them 
frequently. 

We are glad to hear that Natalie Albury 
(1922-23) is enjoying her new school, the 
Castle, at Tarrytown on the Hudson, and 
we are glad that she remembers us and, 



LASELL LEAVES 



31 



with appreciation, her year spent at Lasell, 
where are so many of her dear friends. 

Eleanor Beaman Kendall, '19, with her 
greetings to our Preceptress, expresses a 
hope that we may have the pleasure of wel- 
coming her at Lasell soon, also her little 
son, who arrived November 19. 

Our Principal recently sent out a ques- 
tionnaire to former Lasell girls ; and as a 
result, has learned the sad news of the pass- 
ing away of these former students : 
Helen Scott Dougan (1874-5). 
Bernice Langworthy McFadden (1875-6). 
Nellie Perkins Pattillo 77. 
Lottie Freeman Hardy James (1882-4). 
Mary Pierce Johnson Whitney, '98. 
Harriet Christine Sleicher (1901-2). 
Lillie Reincke Kley (1911-12). 
Vilzora A. Newton (1916-17). 
Lasell extends the deepest sympathy to 
the bereaved families and friends of these 
former students. 

Marian Brown's '22, watchword has evi- 
dently been "Forward." After leaving La- 
sell she entered a teachers' training school 
and is now a Senior about to receive her 
diploma. She speaks with special delight 
of the return to Lasell of her former friend, 
Helen McNab. She often sees Maude Tait, 
'20, who is attending the same school, and 
they have good times, talking over days at 
Lasell. She says, "About a week ago I 
was in a store in Northampton and heard 
some one say my name. Of course I looked 
up and it was Laurie Foster (1921-22). 
Laurie was just as dear and sweet as al- 
ways." 

We regret to record the passing away of 
Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell Piatt (1886-8) on 
January the sixth, in one of the Philadelphia 
hospitals. The word came to us through 
Grace C. Huntington, '89. 

We have recently learned that Thirza 
Abrams, '21, has just returned from a visit 
with her sister in South America. 

A Keokuk daily paper gave a most fasci- 
nating account of the wedding of Lydia Rich 
(1915-17) and Mr. Thomas Francis Gray. 



"There could have been no lovelier bride 
than Miss Rich. Many people consider her 
the most beautiful girl in Keokuk. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gray will make their home in San 
Diego, California, where Mr. Gray is an 
official in the First National Bank of that 
city." 

Dear little Mae Chan Lam (1915-17) does 
not forget her Lasell school home. One of 
the unique cards which have recently been 
received came to us from Mr. and Mrs. Von 
fong Lam of Shanghai. Mae is the happy 
mother of two little boys. 

Another bit of Dr. Bragdon's thoughtful- 
ness was forwarding the cordial letter writ- 
ten to him by Annie Merrill David, '12, as 
a greeting from the Philadelphia Lasell 
Club. To be sure the most interesting 
part of the letter was the most personal. 
Annie sent a charming picture of a wheel- 
barrow full of little folk. The photograph 
was taken on Grandfather Merrill's grounds 
during Annie's annual visit to Enosburg 
Falls, Vermont. She confesses, "I think 
there can't be three much livelier children 
in the whole United States. But they are 
dears and I like them lively." Bless their 
little hearts ! we are sorry that only one of 




MARTHA, MERRILL AND TEDDY, 
CHILDREN OF ANNIE MERRILL DAVJD, '12 



32 



LASELL LEAVES 



the group, a little daughter, Martha, can be 
claimed later on by Lasell. 

A very artistic invitation came to our 
Principal lately from xA.lice Bevin Leewitz, 
'14, to visit her exhibition of paintings at 
the Hotel Bond, Hartford, Connecticut. 
We are all proud of Alice's success and 
wish we could enjoy the attractive glimpse 
of her work 

Mary Goodwdlie Townsend, '12, hoped that 
she would be with us at the midwinter re- 
union ; and we at Lasell hoped the same 
thing, but sickness in her family kept her 
at home. We value her appreciative words 
concerning the Leaves and quote them : "I 
do enjoy having the Leaves and' think the 
girls do so very, very well with its publica- 
tion. There are still so many items of in- 
terest to me that it is a real treat to get a 
copy." 

Elizabeth McEchron Chahoon (1892-4) 
writes directly of herself to the Leaves. The 
letter is dated Miami, Florida, where she 
and her husband have their winter home. 
She reminds us that her home address for 
the last twenty years has been, and still is, 
Grande Mere, Quebec. "My two girls are 
graduates of Westover, Middlebury, Con- 
necticut; and the older one is married. I 
am glad to receive news of old friends 
through the Leaves and am enclosing my 
check for three dollars." This message from 
Elizabeth will be a pleasant surprise to 
many of her old schoolmates and former 
Lasell teachers. 

Jeanette Ritter Heller (1909-10) was one 
of the girls who met Dr. and Mrs. Winslow 
at the Lasell luncheon of the Philadelphia 
Club and followed up that meeting with a 
very interesting letter. With other news 
she tells us of the fine work being accom- 
plished by her ministerial husband, and we 
have no doubt she has a very large and im- 
portant share in his work. One of the best 
bits of personal news she gives, is the re- 
port of the three little children who have 
come into her home, two daughters and a 
son. She writes, "Lasell is the same old 



spot, dear to my heart ; and I am anticipat- 
ing the days when my two little girls will 
be students at Lasell." She writes a gra- 
cious word concerning Dr. and Mrs. Wins- 
low, Miss Dolley and our Preceptress. "I 
don't know whether Miss Potter remembers 
that smallest girl at Lasell back in 1910 
who faithfully went to the Methodist Church 
with her every Sunday." Miss Potter does 
well remember her and is proud of the for- 
ward movement which she has made. With 
the letter Jeanette sent a copy of two dramas 
which she has written for the Woman's Mis- 
sionary Society of the Reformed Church 
of the United States. We wish we had 
time and space to share them with the 
readers of the Leaves ; but her old friends 
can have that pleasure, we are sure, if they 
send to the author whose address is now 
Box 21, Fairfield, Pennsylvania. 

One of the charming invitations which 
came to our Preceptress recently was to the 
graduating exercises of the training school 
for nurses of the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, the special object of interest being 
Helen E. Conger, '21, who was a member 
of the graduating class. All honor to her 
perseverance and best wishes for her con- 
tinued success. 

In her regret at not being able to attend 
the midwinter reunion, Vilette Peck, '15, 
writes, "How often I think of those two 
happy years which I spent at Lasell, so 
crowded with wonderful experiences which 
have meant so much to me." Helen's pres- 
ent address is 33 Sachem Street, Norwich, 
Connecticut ; and she is a busy and we know, 
successful, secretary to her father. 

The latest word from Gladys Davis (1907- 
9) is that she is studying Piano in Boston 
and also teaching. Gladys, if you are as 
near Lasell as Boston, please come out and 
see us. 

Lois Nichols Arnold, '18, in acknowledg- 
ing to our Principal, the Alumnae Number 
of the Leaves, expresses her appreciation of 
getting in touch with many of the Lasell 
girls in this way. Lois was at Lasell last 



LASELL LEAVES 



33 



summer with her dear little baby, but un- 
fortunately many of her resident Lasell 
friends happened that day to be away. 
Please come again, Lois, and bring- the 
baby with you. 

Among' the many happy thoughts carried 
into effect by our Principal, is the sending 
of the Register of Graduates to the old girls. 
In acknowledging this courtesy, Katherine 
L. Clarke (1914-15) of Albion, New York, 
writes, "I often hear of the splendid progress 
of Lasell through Miss Frances Dolley, 
whose home is in Albion. I hope to come 
back sometime again for Commencement 
and become acquainted with Woodland 
Park which must be very attractive." Kath- 
erine intends to keep in touch with the 
school ; for, with her pleasant note, came 
her subscription for the Leaves. 
v Constance E. Blackstock, '09, of Hardoi, 
India, is again in the States and best of all, 
a near neighbor. Let her explain her where- 
abouts and whatabout. To Dr. Winslow 
she writes, "I am studying in the Graduate 
School of Boston University, vainly aspiring 
for a Master's degree. I'm enjoying being 
at school again and renewing and regaining 
my youth as I come in contact with the won- 
derfully exuberant young life at the Un